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Found 34 result(s)
The Chesapeake Bay Environmental Observatory (CBEO) is a prototype to demonstrate the utility of newly developed Cyberinfrastructure (CI) components for transforming environmental research, education, and management. The CBEO project uses a specific problem of water quality (hypoxia) as means of directly involving users and demonstrating the prototype’s utility. Data from the Test Bed are being brought into a CBEO Portal on a National Geoinformatics Grid developed by the NSF funded GEON. This is a cyberinfrastructure netwrok that allows users access to datasets as well as the tools with which to analyze the data. Currently, Test Bed data avaialble on the CBEO Portal includes Water Quality Model output and water quality monitorig data from the Chesapeake Bay Program's CIMS database. This data is also available as aggregated "data cubes". Avaialble tools include the Data Access System for Hydrology (DASH), Hydroseek and an online R-based interpolator.
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Thousands of Temperature and salinity profiles obtained by means of Nansen hydrographic casts and available earlier only as station sheets have been digitized at the German Maritime and Hydrographic Agency (BSH). In a cooperative effort between the KlimaCampus of the University of Hamburg and the German Oceanographic Data Centre (DOD, Hamburg) about 7500 hydrographic profiles were checked and identified as missing in the international oceanographic databases. Since most of the profiles were obtained in the decades before the second World War they represent an important extension of the international historical database and a respective contribution to the IOC Global Oceanographic Data Archeology and Rescue Project (GODAR). Since 2009 our efforts resulted in locating about 7500 hydrographic profiles that are not yet available for the oceanographic community.
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METEOR and Maria S. Merian reports appear in irregular intervals. They serve as working documents for the concerned circle of the expedition group and as reports for funding agencies.
The programme "International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange" (IODE) of the "Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission" (IOC) of UNESCO was established in 1961. Its purpose is to enhance marine research, exploitation and development, by facilitating the exchange of oceanographic data and information between participating Member States, and by meeting the needs of users for data and information products.
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As the national oceanographic data centre for Canada, MEDS maintains centralized repositories of some oceanographic data types collected in Canada, and coordinates data exchanges between DFO and recognized intergovernmental organizations, as well as acts as a central point for oceanographic data requests. Real-time, near real-time (for operational oceanography) or historical data are made available as appropriate.
The World Ocean Database (WOD) is a collection of scientifically quality-controlled ocean profile and plankton data that includes measurements of temperature, salinity, oxygen, phosphate, nitrate, silicate, chlorophyll, alkalinity, pH, pCO2, TCO2, Tritium, Δ13Carbon, Δ14Carbon, Δ18Oxygen, Freon, Helium, Δ3Helium, Neon, and plankton. WOD contains all data of "World Data Service Oceanography" (WDS-Oceanography).
The World Ocean Atlas (WOA) contains objectively analyzed climatological fields of in situ temperature, salinity, oxygen, and other measured variables at standard depth levels for various compositing periods for the world ocean. Regional climatologies were created from the Atlas, providing a set of high resolution mean fields for temperature and salinity. The World Ocean Atlas 2018 (WOA18) release September 30, 2018 updates previous versions of the World Ocean Atlas to include approximately 3 million new oceanographic casts added to the World Ocean Database (WOD) and renewed and updated quality control. The WOA18 temperature and salinity fields are being released as preliminary in order to take advantage of community-wide quality assurance. WOA follows the World Ocean Database - WOD periodic major releases and quarterly updates to those releases.
The Marine-Geo Digital Library is a digital data repository and metadata catalog funded by the U.S. NSF for marine geoscience data from the seafloor and subseafloor environment acquired with ships, towed platforms and submersibles. We accept submissions of derived data products and supporting field data and provide repository services including data publication, open public access and long term archiving. Primary data types are geophysical field data including active source seismic data, potential field, bathymetry, sidescan sonar, near-bottom imagery, other seafloor senor data as well as a diverse array of processed data and interpreted data products (e.g. seismic interpretations, microseismicity catalogs, geologic maps and interpretations, photomosaics and visualizations). Our data resources support scientists working broadly on solid earth science problems ranging from mid-ocean ridge, subduction zone and hotspot processes, to geohazards, continental margin evolution, sediment transport at glaciated and unglaciated margins.
The Index to Marine and Lacustrine Geological Samples is a tool to help scientists locate and obtain geologic material from sea floor and lakebed cores, grabs, and dredges archived by participating institutions around the world. Data and images related to the samples are prepared and contributed by the institutions for access via the IMLGS and long-term archive at NGDC. Before proposing research on any sample, please contact the curator for sample condition and availability. A consortium of Curators guides the IMLGS, maintained on behalf of the group by NGDC, since 1977.
Copernicus is a European system for monitoring the Earth. Copernicus consists of a complex set of systems which collect data from multiple sources: earth observation satellites and in situ sensors such as ground stations, airborne and sea-borne sensors. It processes these data and provides users with reliable and up-to-date information through a set of services related to environmental and security issues. The services address six thematic areas: land monitoring, marine monitoring, atmosphere monitoring, climate change, emergency management and security. The main users of Copernicus services are policymakers and public authorities who need the information to develop environmental legislation and policies or to take critical decisions in the event of an emergency, such as a natural disaster or a humanitarian crisis. Based on the Copernicus services and on the data collected through the Sentinels and the contributing missions , many value-added services can be tailored to specific public or commercial needs, resulting in new business opportunities. In fact, several economic studies have already demonstrated a huge potential for job creation, innovation and growth.
The Woods Hole Open Access Server, WHOAS, is an institutional repository that captures, stores, preserves, and redistributes the intellectual output of the Woods Hole scientific community in digital form. WHOAS is managed by the MBLWHOI Library as a service to the Woods Hole scientific community
OBIS strives to document the ocean's diversity, distribution and abundance of life. Created by the Census of Marine Life, OBIS is now part of the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) of UNESCO, under its International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange (IODE) programme
This interface provides access to several types of data related to the Chesapeake Bay. Bay Program databases can be queried based upon user-defined inputs such as geographic region and date range. Each query results in a downloadable, tab- or comma-delimited text file that can be imported to any program (e.g., SAS, Excel, Access) for further analysis. Comments regarding the interface are encouraged. Questions in reference to the data should be addressed to the contact provided on subsequent pages.
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Australian Ocean Data Network (AODN) provides data collected by the Australian marine community. AODN's data is searchable via map interface and metadata catalogue. AODN is Australia's exhaustive repository for marine and climate data. AODN has merged with IMOS eMarine Information Infrastructure (eMII) Facility in May 2016. IMOS is a multi-institutional collaboration with a focus on open data access. It is ideally placed to manage the AODN on behalf of the Australian marine and climate community.
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Data are the key to successful scientific work. A sophisticated data management will guarantee the long-term availability of observational data and metadata, and will allow for an easy data search and retrieval, to supplement the international data exchange and to provide data products for scientific, political, industrial and public stakeholders.
The TropFlux provides surface heat and momentum flux data of tropical oceans (30°N-30°S) between January 1979 and September 2011. The TropFlux data is produced under a collaboration between Laboratoire d’Océanographie: Expérimentation et Approches Numériques (LOCEAN) from Institut Pierre Simon Laplace (IPSL, Paris, France) and National Institute of Oceanography/CSIR (NIO, Goa, India), and supported by Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD, France). TropFlux relies on data provided by the ECMWF Re-Analysis interim (ERA-I) and ISCCP projects. Since 2014 located at Indian National Centre for Ocean Information Services.
The mission of the GDC is to curate and provide access to oceanographic data, especially from Scripps expeditions, making them accessible for scientific and educational use worldwide. Originally launched by Bill Menard, the GDC has been in operation for more than 40 years. While many historic physical artifacts are carefully preserved, the current emphasis is on digital archiving, in coordination with other national and international programs.
The Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) is an element of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS). The EOSDIS provides science data to a wide community of users for NASA's Science Mission Directorate. Since the launch of NASA's first ocean-observing satellite, Seasat, in 1978, PO.DAAC has become the premier data center for measurements focused on ocean surface topography (OST), sea surface temperature (SST), ocean winds, sea surface salinity (SSS), gravity, ocean circulation and sea ice.In addition to providing access to its data holdings, PO.DAAC acts as a gateway to data stored at other ocean and climate archives. This and other tools and services enable PO.DAAC to support a wide user community working in areas such as ocean and climate research, applied science and industry, natural resource management, policy making, and general public consumption.
GRID-Geneva is a unique platform providing analyses and solutions for a wide range of environmental issues. GRID-Geneva serves primarily the needs of its three institutional partners - UNEP, the Swiss Federal Office for the Environment (FOEN) and the University of Geneva (UniGe) - which are linked by an ongoing, multi-year “Partnership Agreement”, along with other local-to-global stakeholders. GRID-Geneva is also a bilingual English and French centre and the key francophone link within the global GRID network of centres. GRID-Geneva is a key centre of geo-spatial know-how, with strengths in GIS, IP/remote sensing and statistical analyses, integrated through modern spatial data infrastructures and web applications. Working at the interface between scientific information and policy/decision-making, GRID-Geneva also helps to develop capacities in these fields of expertise among target audiences, countries and other groups.
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The CliSAP-Integrated Climate Data Center (ICDC) allows easy access to climate relevant data from in-situ measurements and satellite remote sensing. These data are important to determine the status and the changes in the climate system. Additionally some relevant re-analysis data are included, which are modeled on the basis of observational data.
The datacommons@psu was developed in 2005 to provide a resource for data sharing, discovery, and archiving for the Penn State research and teaching community. Access to information is vital to the research, teaching, and outreach conducted at Penn State. The datacommons@psu serves as a data discovery tool, a data archive for research data created by PSU for projects funded by agencies like the National Science Foundation, as well as a portal to data, applications, and resources throughout the university. The datacommons@psu facilitates interdisciplinary cooperation and collaboration by connecting people and resources and by: Acquiring, storing, documenting, and providing discovery tools for Penn State based research data, final reports, instruments, models and applications. Highlighting existing resources developed or housed by Penn State. Supporting access to project/program partners via collaborative map or web services. Providing metadata development citation information, Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) and links to related publications and project websites. Members of the Penn State research community and their affiliates can easily share and house their data through the datacommons@psu. The datacommons@psu will also develop metadata for your data and provide information to support your NSF, NIH, or other agency data management plan.
The World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS) integrates approximately 100 marine datbases to provide an authoritative and comprehensive list of marine organisms. WoRMS has an editorial system where taxonomic groups are managed by experts responsible for the quality of the information. WorMS register of marine species emerged from the European Register of Marine Species (ERMS) and the Flanders Marine Institute (VLIZ). WoRMS is a contribution to Lifewatch, Catalogue of Life, Encyclopedia of Life, Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Census of Marine Life.
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The Flanders Marine Institute (VLIZ) is a centre for marine and coastal research. As a partner in various projects and networks it promotes and supports the international image of Flemish marine scientific research and international marine education. In its capacity as a coordination and information platform, the Flanders Marine Institute (VLIZ) supports some thousand marine scientists in Flanders by disseminating their knowledge to policymakers, educators, the general public and scientists.
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Our system consists of a portal (portal.geomar.de), providing access to several projects with personal password. The portal offers document exchange, common or individual blogs and fora and implementation of external webpages and -services. Moreover, you can access the expedition database, that organizes data description and exchange of cruises and expeditions for each project. Expeditions are linked to KML-files (Google-Earth compatible), allowing a visualization of all stations of a cruise/expedition. We established the linkage to the publications database /repository OceanRep (EPrints), as well as the description of model-output and linkage to paper publications.
WHOI is the world's leading non-profit oceanographic research organization. WHOI maintains unparalleled depth and breadth of expertise across a range of oceanographic research areas. Institution scientists and engineers work collaboratively within and across six research departments to advance knowledge of the global ocean and its fundamental importance to other planetary systems. At the same time, they also train future generations of ocean scientists and address problems that have a direct impact in efforts to understand and manage critical marine resources.