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The CCHDO's primary mission is to deliver the highest possible quality global CTD and hydrographic data to users. These data are a product of decades of observations related to the physical characteristics of ocean waters carried out during GO-SHIP, WOCE, CLIVAR and numerous other oceanographic research programs. Whenever possible we provide these data in three easy-to-use formats: WHP-Exchange (which we recommend for data submissions to the CCHDO), WOCE, and netCDF. The CCHDO also manages public and non-public CTD data to be used for the global Argo and OceanSITES programs.
The Argo observational network consists of a fleet of 3000+ profiling autonomous floats deployed by about a dozen teams worldwide. WHOI has built about 10% of the global fleet. The mission lifetime of each float is about 4 years. During a typical mission, each float reports a profile of the upper ocean every 10 days. The sensors onboard record fundamental physical properties of the ocean: temperature and conductivity (a measure of salinity) as a function of pressure. The depth range of the observed profile depends on the local stratification and the float's mechanical ability to adjust it's buoyancy. The majority of Argo floats report profiles between 1-2 km depth. At each surfacing, measurements of temperature and salinity are relayed back to shore via satellite. Telemetry is usually received every 10 days, but floats at high-latitudes which are iced-over accumulate their data and transmit the entire record the next time satellite contact is established. With current battery technology, the best performing floats last 6+ years and record over 200 profiles.
The World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS) integrates approximately 100 marine datbases to provide an authoritative and comprehensive list of marine organisms. WoRMS has an editorial system where taxonomic groups are managed by experts responsible for the quality of the information. WorMS register of marine species emerged from the European Register of Marine Species (ERMS) and the Flanders Marine Institute (VLIZ). WoRMS is a contribution to Lifewatch, Catalogue of Life, Encyclopedia of Life, Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Census of Marine Life.
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SISMER (Scientific Information Systems for the Sea) is Ifremer's service in charge of managing numerous marine databases and information systems which Ifremer is responsible for implementing. The information systems managed by SISMER range from CATDS (SMOS satellite data) to geoscience data (bathymetry, seismics, geological samples), not forgetting water column data (physics and chemistry, data for operational oceanography – Coriolis - Copernicus CMEMS), fisheries data (Harmonie), coastal environment data (Quadrige 2) and deep-sea environment data (Archimède). SISMER therefore plays a pivotal role in marine database management both for Ifremer and for many national, European and international projects.