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Found 44 result(s)
Country
As the national oceanographic data centre for Canada, MEDS maintains centralized repositories of some oceanographic data types collected in Canada, and coordinates data exchanges between DFO and recognized intergovernmental organizations, as well as acts as a central point for oceanographic data requests. Real-time, near real-time (for operational oceanography) or historical data are made available as appropriate.
Climate Data Record (CDR) is a time series of measurements of sufficient length, consistency and continuity to determine climate variability and change. The fundamental CDRs include sensor data, such as calibrated radiances and brightness temperatures, that scientists have improved and quality-controlled along with the data used to calibrate them. The thematic CDRs include geophysical variables derived from the fundamental CDRs, such as sea surface temperature and sea ice concentration, and they are specific to various disciplines.
The World Ocean Database (WOD) is a collection of scientifically quality-controlled ocean profile and plankton data that includes measurements of temperature, salinity, oxygen, phosphate, nitrate, silicate, chlorophyll, alkalinity, pH, pCO2, TCO2, Tritium, Δ13Carbon, Δ14Carbon, Δ18Oxygen, Freon, Helium, Δ3Helium, Neon, and plankton. WOD contains all data of "World Data Service Oceanography" (WDS-Oceanography).
The Objectively Analyzed air-sea Fluxes (OAFlux) project is a research and development project focusing on global air-sea heat, moisture, and momentum fluxes. The project is committed to produce high-quality, long-term, global ocean surface forcing datasets from the late 1950s to the present to serve the needs of the ocean and climate communities on the characterization, attribution, modeling, and understanding of variability and long-term change in the atmosphere and the oceans. - Links überprüft 14.6.2017 Re
BSRN is a project of the Radiation Panel (now the Data and Assessment Panel) from the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) under the umbrella of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP). It is the global baseline network for surface radiation for the Global limate Observing System (GCOS), contributing to the Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW), and forming a ooperative network with the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change NDACC).
Country
The IOWDB was designed for the particular requirements of the Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research. It is aimed at the management of historical and recent measurement of the IOW (to some extend of other data, too) and to provide them in a user-friendly way via the research tool ODIN (Oceanographic Database research with Interactive Navigation).
The CCHDO's primary mission is to deliver the highest possible quality global CTD and hydrographic data to users. These data are a product of decades of observations related to the physical characteristics of ocean waters carried out during GO-SHIP, WOCE, CLIVAR and numerous other oceanographic research programs. Whenever possible we provide these data in three easy-to-use formats: WHP-Exchange (which we recommend for data submissions to the CCHDO), WOCE, and netCDF. The CCHDO also manages public and non-public CTD data to be used for the global Argo and OceanSITES programs.
The Woods Hole Open Access Server, WHOAS, is an institutional repository that captures, stores, preserves, and redistributes the intellectual output of the Woods Hole scientific community in digital form. WHOAS is managed by the MBLWHOI Library as a service to the Woods Hole scientific community
Country
The Norwegian Marine Data Centre (NMD) at the Institute of Marine Research was established as a national data centre dedicated to the professional processing and long-term storage of marine environmental and fisheries data and production of data products. The Institute of Marine Research continuously collects large amounts of data from all Norwegian seas. Data are collected using vessels, observation buoys, manual measurements, gliders – amongst others. NMD maintains the largest collection of marine environmental and fisheries data in Norway.
Country
The main objective of the Bolin Centre Database is to ensure the preservation, interoperability and open access of climate research data for members of the Bolin Centre for Climate Research. The Bolin Centre Database also provides expert advice and guidance on data management. The Bolin Centre itself is a multi-disciplinary consortium in Sweden that conducts research and graduate education related to the Earth´s climate, in collaboration between Stockholm University, The Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI) and the KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
The Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) is a publicly accessible earth science data repository created to curate, publicly serve (publish), and archive digital data and information from biological, chemical and biogeochemical research conducted in coastal, marine, great lakes and laboratory environments. The BCO-DMO repository works closely with investigators funded through the NSF OCE Division’s Biological and Chemical Sections and the Division of Polar Programs Antarctic Organisms & Ecosystems. The office provides services that span the full data life cycle, from data management planning support and DOI creation, to archive with appropriate national facilities.
The NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information (formerly the National Geophysical Data Center) provide scientific stewardship, products and services for sea floor and lakebed data, including geophysics (gravity, magnetics, seismic reflection, bathymetry, water column sonar), and data derived from sediment and rock samples. NCEI compiles coastal and global digital elevation models, high-resolution models for tsunami inundation studies, provides stewardship for NOS data supporting charts and navigation, and is the US national long-term archive for MGG data
The primary focus of the Upper Ocean Processes Group is the study of physical processes in the upper ocean and at the air-sea interface using moored surface buoys equipped with meteorological and oceanographic sensors. UOP Project Map The Upper Ocean Processes Group provides technical support to upper ocean and air-sea interface science programs. Deep-ocean and shallow-water moored surface buoy arrays are designed, fabricated, instrumented, tested, and deployed at sea for periods of up to one year
The R2R Portal is a central shore-side gateway through which underway data from oceanographic expeditions will be routinely cataloged and securely transmitted to the national long-term archives including the National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) and National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC).
The CBIF provides primary data on biological species of interest to Canadians. CBIF supports a wide range of social and economic decisions including efforts to conserve our biodiversity in healthy ecosystems, use our biological resources in sustainable ways, and monitor and control pests and diseases. Tools provided by the CBIF include the Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS), Species Access Network, Online Mapping, and the SpeciesBank, including Butterflies of Canada. The CBIF is a member of the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF).
The Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) is an element of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS). The EOSDIS provides science data to a wide community of users for NASA's Science Mission Directorate. Since the launch of NASA's first ocean-observing satellite, Seasat, in 1978, PO.DAAC has become the premier data center for measurements focused on ocean surface topography (OST), sea surface temperature (SST), ocean winds, sea surface salinity (SSS), gravity, ocean circulation and sea ice.In addition to providing access to its data holdings, PO.DAAC acts as a gateway to data stored at other ocean and climate archives. This and other tools and services enable PO.DAAC to support a wide user community working in areas such as ocean and climate research, applied science and industry, natural resource management, policy making, and general public consumption.
The USGODAE Project consists of United States academic, government and military researchers working to improve assimilative ocean modeling as part of the International GODAE Project. GODAE hopes to develop a global system of observations, communications, modeling and assimilation, that will deliver regular, comprehensive information on the state of the oceans, in a way that will promote and engender wide utility and availability of this resource for maximum benefit to the community. The USGODAE Argo GDAC is currently operational, serving daily data from the following national DACs: Australia (CSIRO), Canada (MEDS), China (2: CSIO and NMDIS), France (Coriolis), India (INCOIS), Japan (JMA), Korea (2: KMA and Kordi), UK (BODC), and US (AOML).
The DBCP is an international program coordinating the use of autonomous data buoys to observe atmospheric and oceanographic conditions, over ocean areas where few other measurements are taken.
SeaDataNet is a standardized system for managing the large and diverse data sets collected by the oceanographic fleets and the automatic observation systems. The SeaDataNet infrastructure network and enhance the currently existing infrastructures, which are the national oceanographic data centres of 35 countries, active in data collection. The networking of these professional data centres, in a unique virtual data management system provide integrated data sets of standardized quality on-line. As a research infrastructure, SeaDataNet contributes to build research excellence in Europe.
The NCMA maintains the largest and most diverse collection of publically available marine algal strains in the world. The algal strains in the collection have been obtained from all over the world, from polar to tropical waters, marine, freshwater, brackish, and hyper-saline environments. New strains (50 - 100 per year) are added largely through the accession of strains deposited by scientists in the community. A stringent accession policy is required to help populate the collection with a diverse range of strains.
Paleoclimatology data are derived from natural sources such as tree rings, ice cores, corals, and ocean and lake sediments. These proxy climate data extend the archive of weather and climate information hundreds to millions of years. The data include geophysical or biological measurement time series and some reconstructed climate variables such as temperature and precipitation. NCEI provides the paleoclimatology data and information scientists need to understand natural climate variability and future climate change. We also operate the World Data Center for Paleoclimatology, which archives and distributes data contributed by scientists around the world.
The Ocean Biology Processing Group (OBPG) serves as the Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) for all Ocean Biology (OB) data produced or collected under NASA’s Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS). This website thus serves as the primary data access portal to the NASA OB.DAAC. The links below provide a variety of methods to access the holdings of the OB.DAAC, including visual browsers that enable point-and-click access by data levels and direct access for bulk download. In agreement with partner organizations, some data access requires user registration to enable better tracking of usage metrics.
The U.S. launched the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS) in the late 1980s to study the ocean carbon cycle. An ambitious goal was set to understand the controls on the concentrations and fluxes of carbon and associated nutrients in the ocean. A new field of ocean biogeochemistry emerged with an emphasis on quality measurements of carbon system parameters and interdisciplinary field studies of the biological, chemical and physical process which control the ocean carbon cycle. As we studied ocean biogeochemistry, we learned that our simple views of carbon uptake and transport were severely limited, and a new "wave" of ocean science was born. U.S. JGOFS has been supported primarily by the U.S. National Science Foundation in collaboration with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the Department of Energy and the Office of Naval Research. U.S. JGOFS, ended in 2005 with the conclusion of the Synthesis and Modeling Project (SMP).