Filter
Reset all

Subjects

Content Types

Countries

AID systems

API

Certificates

Data access

Data access restrictions

Database access

Database licenses

Data licenses

Data upload

Data upload restrictions

Enhanced publication

Institution responsibility type

Institution type

Keywords

Metadata standards

PID systems

Provider types

Quality management

Repository languages

Software

Syndications

Repository types

Versioning

  • * at the end of a keyword allows wildcard searches
  • " quotes can be used for searching phrases
  • + represents an AND search (default)
  • | represents an OR search
  • - represents a NOT operation
  • ( and ) implies priority
  • ~N after a word specifies the desired edit distance (fuzziness)
  • ~N after a phrase specifies the desired slop amount
Found 27 result(s)
NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) are responsible for hosting and providing public access to one of the most significant archives for environmental data on Earth with over 20 petabytes of comprehensive atmospheric, coastal, oceanic, and geophysical data. NCEI headquarters are located in Asheville, North Carolina. Most employees work in the four main locations, but apart from those locations, NCEI has employees strategically located throughout the United States. The main locations are Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites–North Carolina (CICS-NC) at Asheville, North Carolina, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) at Boulder Colorado, Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites–Maryland (CICS-MD) at Silver Spring Maryland and Stennis Space Center, Mississippi.
The National Deep Submergence Facility (NDSF) operates the Human Occupied Vehicle (HOV) Alvin, the Remote Operated Vehicle (ROV) Jason 2, and the Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) Sentry. Data acquired with these platforms is provided both to the science party on each expedition, and to the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) Data Library.
The Marine-Geo Digital Library is a digital data repository and metadata catalog funded by the U.S. NSF for marine geoscience data from the seafloor and subseafloor environment acquired with ships, towed platforms and submersibles. We accept submissions of derived data products and supporting field data and provide repository services including data publication, open public access and long term archiving. Primary data types are geophysical field data including active source seismic data, potential field, bathymetry, sidescan sonar, near-bottom imagery, other seafloor senor data as well as a diverse array of processed data and interpreted data products (e.g. seismic interpretations, microseismicity catalogs, geologic maps and interpretations, photomosaics and visualizations). Our data resources support scientists working broadly on solid earth science problems ranging from mid-ocean ridge, subduction zone and hotspot processes, to geohazards, continental margin evolution, sediment transport at glaciated and unglaciated margins.
Copernicus is a European system for monitoring the Earth. Copernicus consists of a complex set of systems which collect data from multiple sources: earth observation satellites and in situ sensors such as ground stations, airborne and sea-borne sensors. It processes these data and provides users with reliable and up-to-date information through a set of services related to environmental and security issues. The services address six thematic areas: land monitoring, marine monitoring, atmosphere monitoring, climate change, emergency management and security. The main users of Copernicus services are policymakers and public authorities who need the information to develop environmental legislation and policies or to take critical decisions in the event of an emergency, such as a natural disaster or a humanitarian crisis. Based on the Copernicus services and on the data collected through the Sentinels and the contributing missions , many value-added services can be tailored to specific public or commercial needs, resulting in new business opportunities. In fact, several economic studies have already demonstrated a huge potential for job creation, innovation and growth.
The International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) is an international marine research collaboration that explores Earth's history and dynamics using ocean-going research platforms to recover data recorded in seafloor sediments and rocks and to monitor subseafloor environments. IODP depends on facilities funded by three platform providers with financial contributions from five additional partner agencies. Together, these entities represent 26 nations whose scientists are selected to staff IODP research expeditions conducted throughout the world's oceans. IODP expeditions are developed from hypothesis-driven science proposals aligned with the program's science plan Illuminating Earth's Past, Present, and Future. The science plan identifies 14 challenge questions in the four areas of climate change, deep life, planetary dynamics, and geohazards. Until 2013 under the name: International Ocean Drilling Program.
The MGDS MediaBank contains high quality images, illustrations, animations and video clips that are organized into galleries. Media can be sorted by category, and keyword and map-based search options are provided. Each item in the MediaBank is accompanied by metadata that provides access into our cruise catalog and data repository.
Open Core Data is a data infrastructure focused on making data from scientific continental and ocean drilling projects semantically discoverable, persistent, citable, and approachable to maximize their utility to present and future geoscience researchers.
The Antarctic and Southern Ocean Data Portal, part of the US Antarctic Data Consortium, provides access to geoscience data, primarily marine, from the Antarctic region. The synthesis began in 2003 as the Antarctic Multibeam Bathymetry and Geophysical Data Synthesis (AMBS) with a focus on multibeam bathymetry field data and other geophysical data from the Southern Ocean collected with the R/V N. B. Palmer. In 2005, the effort was expanded to include all routine underway geophysical and oceanographic data collected with both the R/V N. B. Palmer and R/V L. Gould, the two primary research vessels serving the US Antarctic Program.
The R2R Portal is a central shore-side gateway through which underway data from oceanographic expeditions will be routinely cataloged and securely transmitted to the national long-term archives including the National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) and National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC).
Scripps Institute of Oceanography (SIO) Explorer includes five federated collections: SIO Cruises, SIO Historic Photographs, the Seamounts, Marine Geological Samples, and the Educator’s Collection, all part of the US National Science Digital Library (NSDL). Each collection represents a unique resource of irreplaceable scientific research. The effort is collaboration among researchers at Scripps, computer scientists from the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC), and archivists and librarians from the UCSD Libraries. In 2005 SIOExplorer was extended to the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution with the Multi-Institution Scalable Digital Archiving project, funded through the joint NSF/Library of Congress digital archiving and preservation program, creating a harvesting methodology and a prototype collection of cruises, Alvin submersible dives and Jason ROV lowerings.
The Environmental Data Explorer is the authoritative source for data sets used by UNEP and its partners in the Global Environment Outlook (GEO) report and other integrated environment assessments. Its online database holds more than 500 different variables, as national, subregional, regional and global statistics or as geospatial data sets (maps), covering themes like Freshwater, Population, Forests, Emissions, Climate, Disasters, Health and GDP. Display them on-the-fly as maps, graphs, data tables or download the data in different formats
The Research Data Archive (RDA) at NCAR contains a large and diverse collection of meteorological and oceanographic observations, operational and reanalysis model outputs, and remote sensing datasets to support atmospheric and geosciences research, along with ancillary datasets, such as topography/bathymetry, vegetation, and land use.
ERDDAP is a data server that gives you a simple, consistent way to download subsets of gridded and tabular scientific datasets in common file formats and make graphs and maps. This particular ERDDAP installation has oceanographic data (for example, data from satellites and buoys).
The datacommons@psu was developed in 2005 to provide a resource for data sharing, discovery, and archiving for the Penn State research and teaching community. Access to information is vital to the research, teaching, and outreach conducted at Penn State. The datacommons@psu serves as a data discovery tool, a data archive for research data created by PSU for projects funded by agencies like the National Science Foundation, as well as a portal to data, applications, and resources throughout the university. The datacommons@psu facilitates interdisciplinary cooperation and collaboration by connecting people and resources and by: Acquiring, storing, documenting, and providing discovery tools for Penn State based research data, final reports, instruments, models and applications. Highlighting existing resources developed or housed by Penn State. Supporting access to project/program partners via collaborative map or web services. Providing metadata development citation information, Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) and links to related publications and project websites. Members of the Penn State research community and their affiliates can easily share and house their data through the datacommons@psu. The datacommons@psu will also develop metadata for your data and provide information to support your NSF, NIH, or other agency data management plan.
The World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS) integrates approximately 100 marine datbases to provide an authoritative and comprehensive list of marine organisms. WoRMS has an editorial system where taxonomic groups are managed by experts responsible for the quality of the information. WorMS register of marine species emerged from the European Register of Marine Species (ERMS) and the Flanders Marine Institute (VLIZ). WoRMS is a contribution to Lifewatch, Catalogue of Life, Encyclopedia of Life, Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Census of Marine Life.
WHOI is the world's leading non-profit oceanographic research organization. WHOI maintains unparalleled depth and breadth of expertise across a range of oceanographic research areas. Institution scientists and engineers work collaboratively within and across six research departments to advance knowledge of the global ocean and its fundamental importance to other planetary systems. At the same time, they also train future generations of ocean scientists and address problems that have a direct impact in efforts to understand and manage critical marine resources.
IEDA is a community-based facility that serves to support, sustain, and advance the geosciences by providing data services for observational Geoscience data from the Ocean, Earth, and Polar Sciences. IEDA welcomes and encourages investigators to contribute their data to the IEDA collections so that the data can be discovered and reused by a diverse community now and in the future. The IEDA collections are: EarthChem, Geochron, System for Earth Sample Registration (SESAR), Marine Geoscience Data System (MGDS), and USAP Data Center. Meta-Search provided on the portal through IEDA Data Browser http://www.iedadata.org/databrowser .
The National Coastal Data Development Center, a division of the National Oceanographic Data Center, is dedicated to building the long-term coastal data record to support environmental prediction, scientific analysis, and formulation of public policy. >>>!!!<<< For informations about the migration of data from NODC to NCEI see: https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/about >>>!!!<<</index.html
The Arctic Data Center is the primary data and software repository for the Arctic section of NSF Polar Programs. The Center helps the research community to reproducibly preserve and discover all products of NSF-funded research in the Arctic, including data, metadata, software, documents, and provenance that links these together. The repository is open to contributions from NSF Arctic investigators, and data are released under an open license (CC-BY, CC0, depending on the choice of the contributor). All science, engineering, and education research supported by the NSF Arctic research program are included, such as Natural Sciences (Geoscience, Earth Science, Oceanography, Ecology, Atmospheric Science, Biology, etc.) and Social Sciences (Archeology, Anthropology, Social Science, etc.). Key to the initiative is the partnership between NCEAS at UC Santa Barbara, DataONE, and NOAA’s NCEI, each of which bring critical capabilities to the Center. Infrastructure from the successful NSF-sponsored DataONE federation of data repositories enables data replication to NCEI, providing both offsite and institutional diversity that are critical to long term preservation.
DLESE is the Digital Library for Earth System Education, a geoscience community resource that supports teaching and learning about the Earth system. It is funded by the National Science Foundation and is being built by a community of educators, students, and scientists to support Earth system education at all levels and in both formal and informal settings. Resources in DLESE include lesson plans, scientific data, visualizations, interactive computer models, and virtual field trips - in short, any web-accessible teaching or learning material. Many of these resources are organized in collections, or groups of related resources that reflect a coherent, focused theme. In many ways, digital collections are analogous to collections in traditional bricks-and-mortar libraries.
The MARGINS Data Portal was established in fall 2003 in response to a program call for a dedicated data system to facilitate open and timely exchange of data in support of the interdisciplinary science goals of the program. The Data Portal has been built with the primary goal of providing full cataloging, open access, and long-term preservation of data collected during MARGINS/GeoPRISMS programs. The backbone of the system is an expedition metadata catalog, which provides information on field programs (who, what, when and where), inventories of sensor data and samples, relevant metadata and the links to associated data files which reside either within the Data Portal or at distributed repositories. The system is designed to leverage all relevant existing data resources and provides a framework for a broader distributed data system.
The mission of World Data Center for Climate (WDCC) is to provide central support for the German and European climate research community. The WDCC is member of the ICSU's World Data System. Emphasis is on development and implementation of best practice methods for Earth System data management. Data for and from climate research are collected, stored and disseminated. The WDCC is restricted to data products. Cooperations exist with thematically corresponding data centres of, e.g., earth observation, meteorology, oceanography, paleo climate and environmental sciences. The services of WDCC are also available to external users at cost price. A special service for the direct integration of research data in scientific publications has been developed. The editorial process at WDCC ensures the quality of metadata and research data in collaboration with the data producers. A citation code and a digital identifier (DOI) are provided and registered together with citation information at the DOI registration agency DataCite.