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Found 42 result(s)
!!! We will terminate ASTER Products Distribution Service in March 2016 although we have been providing ASTER Products since November 20, 2000. !!! ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection radiometer) is the high efficiency optical imager which covers a wide spectral region from the visible to the thermal infra-red by 14 spectral bands. ASTER acquires data which can be used in various fields in earth science. ASTER was launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, USA in 1999 aboard the Terra, which is the first satellite of the EOS Project. The purpose of ASTER project is to make contributions to extend the understanding of local and regional phenomena on the Earth surface and its atmosphere. The followings are ASTER related information, which includes ASTER instrument, ASTER Ground Data System, ASTER Science Activities, ASTER Data Distribution and so on. ASTER Search provides services to search and order ASTER data products on the website.
The ACTRIS DC is designed to assist scientists with discovering and accessing atmospheric data and contains an up-to-date catalogue of available datasets in a number of databases distributed throughout the world. A site like this can never be complete, but we have aimed at including datasets from the most relevant databases to the ACTRIS project, also building on the work and experiences achieved in the EU FP6 research project Global Earth Observation and Monitoring. The focus of the web portal is validated data, but it is also possible to browse the ACTRIS data server for preliminary data (rapid delivery data) through this site. The web site allows you to search in a local metadata catalogue that contains information on actual datasets that are archived in external archives. It is set up so that you can search for data by selecting the chemical/physical variable, the data location, the database that holds the data, the type of data, the data acquisition platform, and the data matrix
AIRS moves climate research and weather prediction into the 21st century. AIRS is one of six instruments on board the Aqua satellite, part of the NASA Earth Observing System. AIRS along with its partner microwave instrument the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit AMSU-A, represents the most advanced atmospheric sounding system ever deployed in space. Together these instruments observe the global water and energy cycles, climate variation and trends, and the response of the climate system to increased greenhouse gases.
EBAS is a database hosting observation data of atmospheric chemical composition and physical properties. EBAS hosts data submitted by data originators in support of a number of national and international programs ranging from monitoring activities to research projects. EBAS is developed and operated by the Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU). We hope the information found on the web-site is self explanatory, and we would particularly ask you to consider the text found in the data disclaimer and in the “info” pages associated to the filter criteria.
Climate Data Record (CDR) is a time series of measurements of sufficient length, consistency and continuity to determine climate variability and change. The fundamental CDRs include sensor data, such as calibrated radiances and brightness temperatures, that scientists have improved and quality-controlled along with the data used to calibrate them. The thematic CDRs include geophysical variables derived from the fundamental CDRs, such as sea surface temperature and sea ice concentration, and they are specific to various disciplines.
Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC) provides historical and current climate data for the western United States. WRCC is one of six regional climate centers partnering with NOAA research institutes to promote climate research and data stewardship.
SuperDARN is an international HF radar network designed to measure global-scale magnetospheric convection by observing plasma motion in the Earth’s upper atmosphere. This network consists of more than 20 radars operating on frequencies between 8 and 20 MHz that look into the polar regions of Earth. These radars can measure the position and velocity of charged particles in our ionosphere, the highest layer of the Earth's atmosphere, and provide scientists with information regarding Earth's interaction with the space environment.
To understand the global surface energy budget is to understand climate. Because it is impractical to cover the earth with monitoring stations, the answer to global coverage lies in reliable satellite-based estimates. Efforts are underway at NASA and universities to develop algorithms to do this, but such projects are in their infancy. In concert with these ambitious efforts, accurate and precise ground-based measurements in differing climatic regions are essential to refine and verify the satellite-based estimates, as well as to support specialized research. To fill this niche, the Surface Radiation Budget Network (SURFRAD) was established in 1993 through the support of NOAA's Office of Global Programs.
The AOML Environmental Data Server (ENVIDS) provides interactive, on-line access to various oceanographic and atmospheric datasets residing at AOML. The in-house datasets include Atlantic Expendable Bathythermograph (XBT), Global Lagrangian Drifting Buoy, Hurricane Flight Level, and Atlantic Hurricane Tracks (North Atlantic Best Track and Synoptic). Other available datasets include Pacific Conductivitiy/Temperature/Depth Recorder (CTD) and World Ocean Atlas 1998.
WDC for Meteorology, Asheville acquires, catalogues, and archives data and makes them available to requesters in the international scientific community. Data are exchanged with counterparts, WDC for Meteorology, Obninsk and WDC for Meteorology, Beijing as necessary to improve access. Special research data sets prepared under international programs such as the IGY, World Climate Program (WCP), Global Atmospheric Research Program (GARP), etc., are archived and made available to the research community. All data and special data sets contributed to the WDC are available to scientific investigators without restriction. Data are available from 1755 to 2015.
Country
eKlima is a web site to access the database of climate data of the Norwegian Meteorological Institute from an external computer. The database contains measurements made by the Norwegian Meteorological Institute and its collaborators as far back in time as 1957. There are also some data that are older than that, with the longest data sets going as far back in time as 150 years. However, for the period before 1957 not all measurements are completely digitised yet.
The Earth Orientation Centre is responsible for monitoring of long-term earth orientation parameters, publications for time dissemination and leap second announcements.
The World Data Center for Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere, WDC-RSAT, offers scientists and the general public free access (in the sense of a “one-stop shop”) to a continuously growing collection of atmosphere-related satellite-based data sets (ranging from raw to value added data), information products and services. Focus is on atmospheric trace gases, aerosols, dynamics, radiation, and cloud physical parameters. Complementary information and data on surface parameters (e.g. vegetation index, surface temperatures) is also provided. This is achieved either by giving access to data stored at the data center or by acting as a portal containing links to other providers.
ICOS Carbon Portal is the data portal of the Integrated Carbon Observation System. It provides observational data from the state of the carbon cycle in Europe and the world. The Carbon Portal is the data center of the ICOS infrastructure. ICOS will collect greenhouse gas concentration and fluxes observations from three separate networks, all these observations are carried out to support research to help us understand how the Earth’s greenhouse gas balance works, because there are still many and large uncertainties!
As one of the cornerstones of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Geospatial Program, The National Map is a collaborative effort among the USGS and other Federal, State, and local partners to improve and deliver topographic information for the Nation. It has many uses ranging from recreation to scientific analysis to emergency response. The National Map is easily accessible for display on the Web, as products and services, and as downloadable data. The geographic information available from The National Map includes orthoimagery (aerial photographs), elevation, geographic names, hydrography, boundaries, transportation, structures, and land cover. Other types of geographic information can be added within the viewer or brought in with The National Map data into a Geographic Information System to create specific types of maps or map views.
As part of the Copernicus Space Component programme, ESA manages the coordinated access to the data procured from the various Contributing Missions and the Sentinels, in response to the Copernicus users requirements. The Data Access Portfolio documents the data offer and the access rights per user category. The CSCDA portal is the access point to all data, including Sentinel missions, for Copernicus Core Users as defined in the EU Copernicus Programme Regulation (e.g. Copernicus Services).The Copernicus Space Component (CSC) Data Access system is the interface for accessing the Earth Observation products from the Copernicus Space Component. The system overall space capacity relies on several EO missions contributing to Copernicus, and it is continuously evolving, with new missions becoming available along time and others ending and/or being replaced.
This centre receives and archives precipitation chemistry data and complementary information from stations around the world. Data archived by this centre are accessible via connections with the WDCPC database. Freely available data from regional and national programmes with their own Web sites are accessible via links to these sites. The WDCPC is one of six World Data Centres in the World Meteorological Organization Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW). The focus on precipitation chemistry is described in the GAW Precipitation Chemistry Programme. Guidance on all aspects of collecting precipitation for chemical analysis is provided in the Manual for the GAW Precipitation Chemistry Programme (WMO-GAW Report No. 160).
LAADS DAAC is the web interface to the Level 1 and Atmosphere Archive and Distribution System (LAADS). The mission of LAADS is to provide quick and easy access to MODIS Level 1, Atmosphere and Land data products, VIIRS Level 1 and Land data products MAS and MERIS data products. MODIS (or Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) is a key instrument aboard the Terra (EOS AM) and Aqua (EOS PM) satellites.
Country
VSSO collects and provides Space science data from Chinese missions. Chinese Space Science Center is a member of ICSU World Data System
The Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES) is a key component of the Earth Observing System (EOS) program. CERES instruments provide radiometric measurements of the Earth’s atmosphere from three broadband channels. CERES products include both solar-reflected and Earth-emitted radiation from the top of the atmosphere to the Earth's surface.
Country
DataDOI is a digital service by University of Tartu that collects, preserves, and distributes scientific research data. Open data can freely and without any restrictions be downloaded, disseminated and re-used
UNAVCO promotes research by providing access to data that our community of geodetic scientists uses for quantifying the motions of rock, ice and water that are monitored by a variety of sensor types at or near the Earth's surface. After processing, these data enable millimeter-scale surface motion detection and monitoring at discrete points, and high-resolution strain imagery over areas of tens of square meters to hundreds of square kilometers. The data types include GPS/GNSS, imaging data such as from SAR and TLS, strain and seismic borehole data, and meteorological data. Most of these can be accessed via web services. In addition, GPS/GNSS datasets, TLS datasets, and InSAR products are assigned digital object identifiers.
The U.S. launched the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS) in the late 1980s to study the ocean carbon cycle. An ambitious goal was set to understand the controls on the concentrations and fluxes of carbon and associated nutrients in the ocean. A new field of ocean biogeochemistry emerged with an emphasis on quality measurements of carbon system parameters and interdisciplinary field studies of the biological, chemical and physical process which control the ocean carbon cycle. As we studied ocean biogeochemistry, we learned that our simple views of carbon uptake and transport were severely limited, and a new "wave" of ocean science was born. U.S. JGOFS has been supported primarily by the U.S. National Science Foundation in collaboration with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the Department of Energy and the Office of Naval Research. U.S. JGOFS, ended in 2005 with the conclusion of the Synthesis and Modeling Project (SMP).