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Found 17 result(s)
Galaxies, made up of billions of stars like our Sun, are the beacons that light up the structure of even the most distant regions in space. Not all galaxies are alike, however. They come in very different shapes and have very different properties; they may be large or small, old or young, red or blue, regular or confused, luminous or faint, dusty or gas-poor, rotating or static, round or disky, and they live either in splendid isolation or in clusters. In other words, the universe contains a very colourful and diverse zoo of galaxies. For almost a century, astronomers have been discussing how galaxies should be classified and how they relate to each other in an attempt to attack the big question of how galaxies form. Galaxy Zoo (Lintott et al. 2008, 2011) pioneered a novel method for performing large-scale visual classifications of survey datasets. This webpage allows anyone to download the resulting GZ classifications of galaxies in the project.
The International Service of Geomagnetic Indices (ISGI) is in charge of the elaboration and dissemination of geomagnetic indices, and of tables of remarkable magnetic events, based on the report of magnetic observatories distributed all over the planet, with the help of ISGI Collaborating Institutes. The interaction between the solar wind, including plasma and interplanetary magnetic field, and the Earth's magnetosphere results in a transfer of energy and particles inside the magnetosphere. Solar wind characteristics are highly variable, and they have actually a direct influence on the shape and size of the magnetosphere, on the amount of transferred energy, and on the way this energy is dissipated. It is clear that the great diversity of sources of magnetic variations give rise to a great complexity in ground magnetic signatures. Geomagnetic indices aim at describing the geomagnetic activity or some of its components. Each geomagnetic index is related to different phenomena occurring in the magnetosphere, ionosphere and deep in the Earth in its own unique way. The location of a measurement, the timing of the measurement and the way the index is calculated all affect the type of phenomenon the index relates to. The IAGA endorsed geomagnetic indices and lists of remarkable geomagnetic events constitute unique temporal and spatial coverage data series homogeneous since middle of 19th century.
The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is one of the most ambitious and influential surveys in the history of astronomy. Over eight years of operations (SDSS-I, 2000-2005; SDSS-II, 2005-2008; SDSS-III 2008-2014; SDSS-IV 2013 ongoing), it obtained deep, multi-color images covering more than a quarter of the sky and created 3-dimensional maps containing more than 930,000 galaxies and more than 120,000 quasars. DSS-IV is managed by the Astrophysical Research Consortium for the Participating Institutions of the SDSS Collaboration including the Carnegie Institution for Science, Carnegie Mellon University, the Chilean Participation Group, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, The Johns Hopkins University, Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU) / University of Tokyo, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Leibniz Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik (MPA Garching), Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik (MPE), Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie (MPIA Heidelberg), National Astronomical Observatory of China, New Mexico State University, New York University, The Ohio State University, Pennsylvania State University, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, United Kingdom Participation Group, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, University of Arizona, University of Colorado Boulder, University of Portsmouth, University of Utah, University of Washington, University of Wisconsin, Vanderbilt University, and Yale University.
The University of Cape Town (UCT) uses Figshare for institutions for their data repository, which was launched in 2017 and is called ZivaHub: Open Data UCT. ZivaHub serves principal investigators at the University of Cape Town who are in need of a repository to store and openly disseminate the data that support their published research findings. The repository service is provided in terms of the UCT Research Data Management Policy. It provides open access to supplementary research data files and links to their respective scholarly publications (e.g. theses, dissertations, papers et al) hosted on other platforms, such as OpenUCT.
The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is a radio telescope with around one million square metres of collecting area, designed to study the Universe with unprecedented speed and sensitivity. The SKA is not a single telescope, but a collection of various types of antennas, called an array, to be spread over long distances. The SKA will be used to answer fundamental questions of science and about the laws of nature, such as: how did the Universe, and the stars and galaxies contained in it, form and evolve? Was Einstein’s theory of relativity correct? What is the nature of ‘dark matter’ and ‘dark energy’? What is the origin of cosmic magnetism? Is there life somewhere else in the Universe?
The ESO/ST-ECF science archive is a joint collaboration of the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere (ESO) and the Space Telescope - European Coordinating Facility (ST-ECF). ESO observational data can be requested after the proprietary period by the astronomical community.
The Australian National University undertake work to collect and publish metadata about research data held by ANU, and in the case of four discipline areas, Earth Sciences, Astronomy, Phenomics and Digital Humanities to develop pipelines and tools to enable the publication of research data using a common and repeatable approach. Aims and outcomes: To identify and describe research data held at ANU, to develop a consistent approach to the publication of metadata on the University's data holdings: Identification and curation of significant orphan data sets that might otherwise be lost or inadvertently destroyed, to develop a culture of data data sharing and data re-use.
The datacommons@psu was developed in 2005 to provide a resource for data sharing, discovery, and archiving for the Penn State research and teaching community. Access to information is vital to the research, teaching, and outreach conducted at Penn State. The datacommons@psu serves as a data discovery tool, a data archive for research data created by PSU for projects funded by agencies like the National Science Foundation, as well as a portal to data, applications, and resources throughout the university. The datacommons@psu facilitates interdisciplinary cooperation and collaboration by connecting people and resources and by: Acquiring, storing, documenting, and providing discovery tools for Penn State based research data, final reports, instruments, models and applications. Highlighting existing resources developed or housed by Penn State. Supporting access to project/program partners via collaborative map or web services. Providing metadata development citation information, Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) and links to related publications and project websites. Members of the Penn State research community and their affiliates can easily share and house their data through the datacommons@psu. The datacommons@psu will also develop metadata for your data and provide information to support your NSF, NIH, or other agency data management plan.
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Edmond is the institutional repository of the Max Planck Society for public research data. It enables Max Planck scientists to create citable scientific assets by describing, enriching, sharing, exposing, linking, publishing and archiving research data of all kinds. A unique feature of Edmond is the dedicated metadata management, which supports a non-restrictive metadata schema definition, as simple as you like or as complex as your parameters require. Further on, all objects within Edmond have a unique identifier and therefore can be clearly referenced in publications or reused in other contexts.
The UCL Research Data Repository is the institutional data repository of University College London. Based on Figshare, it accepts data deposits from UCL staff and doctoral students from all disciplines. Depositors are encouraged to use CC0 licences to make their data available to the widest possible range of users and the widest range of uses.
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Publication of scans of photographic plates from the so-called "Potsdam zone" of the Carte du Ciel project (32 deg to 39 deg). A total of 977 plates of 2 square degree sky regions was observed and recorded between 1913 to 1924. Since Potsdam Observatory ended participation in the Carte du Ciel project, these observations were so far not analysed or published. Plates were scanned in by a flat bed scanner in 2007-2008. Limitations in astrometric precision as well are to be expected, and specific observational restrains apply, such as multiple exposures on certain plates (see literature)