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Found 14 result(s)
UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot is the manually annotated and reviewed section of the UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB). It is a high quality annotated and non-redundant protein sequence database, which brings together experimental results, computed features and scientific conclusions. Since 2002, it is maintained by the UniProt consortium and is accessible via the UniProt website.
Our knowledge of the many life-forms on Earth - of animals, plants, fungi, protists and bacteria - is scattered around the world in books, journals, databases, websites, specimen collections, and in the minds of people everywhere. Imagine what it would mean if this information could be gathered together and made available to everyone – anywhere – at a moment’s notice. This dream is becoming a reality through the Encyclopedia of Life.
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GBIF is an international organisation that is working to make the world's biodiversity data accessible everywhere in the world. GBIF and its many partners work to mobilize the data, and to improve search mechanisms, data and metadata standards, web services, and the other components of an Internet-based information infrastructure for biodiversity. GBIF makes available data that are shared by hundreds of data publishers from around the world. These data are shared according to the GBIF Data Use Agreement, which includes the provision that users of any data accessed through or retrieved via the GBIF Portal will always give credit to the original data publishers.
The Biodiversity Research Program (PPBio) was created in 2004 with the aims of furthering biodiversity studies in Brazil, decentralizing scientific production from already-developed academic centers, integrating research activities and disseminating results across a variety of purposes, including environmental management and education. PPBio contributes its data to the DataONE network as a member node: https://search.dataone.org/#profile/PPBIO
OBIS strives to document the ocean's diversity, distribution and abundance of life. Created by the Census of Marine Life, OBIS is now part of the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) of UNESCO, under its International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange (IODE) programme
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Morph·D·Base has been developed to serve scientific research and education. It provides a platform for storing the detailed documentation of all material, methods, procedures, and concepts applied, together with the specific parameters, values, techniques, and instruments used during morphological data production. In other words, it's purpose is to provide a publicly available resource for recording and documenting morphological metadata. Moreover, it is also a repository for different types of media files that can be uploaded in order to serve as support and empirical substantiation of the results of morphological investigations. Our long-term perspective with Morph·D·Base is to provide an instrument that will enable a highly formalized and standardized way of generating morphological descriptions using a morphological ontology that will be based on the web ontology language (OWL - http://www.w3.org/TR/owl-features/). This, however, represents a project that is still in development.
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"IndExs" is a database comprising information on exsiccatae (=exsiccatal series) with titles, abbreviations, bibliography and provides a unique and persistent Exsiccata ID for each series. Exsiccatae are defined as "published, uniform, numbered sets of preserved specimens distributed with printed labels" (Pfister 1985). Please note that there are two similar latin terms: "exsiccata, ae" is feminine and used for a set of dried specimens as defined above, whereas the term "exsiccatum, i" is neutral and used for dried specimens in general. If available, images of one or more examplary labels are added to give layout information.
This site offers an enormous collection of photographs of wild species and natural history objects. It covers most groups of organisms with the exception of birds and other vertebrates. The photographs are presented to illustrate biodiversity and as an aid to identification. The criterion for inclusion of a species is that it must have been, or might be expected to be, found in Britain or Ireland. BioImages follows the biological classification. Biota is a hierarchical system with species grouped in genera, genera in families, families in orders and so on up to kingdoms and superkingdoms. The datasets are linked to bioinfo: food webs and species interactions in the Biodiversity of UK and Ireland.
VertNet is a NSF-funded collaborative project that makes biodiversity data free and available on the web. VertNet is a tool designed to help people discover, capture, and publish biodiversity data. It is also the core of a collaboration between hundreds of biocollections that contribute biodiversity data and work together to improve it. VertNet is an engine for training current and future professionals to use and build upon best practices in data quality, curation, research, and data publishing. Yet, VertNet is still the aggregate of all of the information that it mobilizes. To us, VertNet is all of these things and more.
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LIAS is a global information system for Lichenized and Non-Lichenized Ascomycetes. It includes several interoperable data repositories. In recent years, the two core components ‘LIAS names’ and ‘LIAS light’ have been much enlarged. LIAS light is storing phenotypic trait data. They includes > 10,700 descriptions (about 2/3 of all known lichen species), each with up to 75 descriptors comprising 2,000 traits (descriptor states and values), including 800 secondary metabolites. 500 traits may have biological functions and more than 1,000 may have phylogenetic relevance. LIAS is thus one of the most comprehensive trait databases in organismal biology. The online interactive identification key for more than 10,700 lichens is powered by the Java applet NaviKey and has been translated into 19 languages (besides English) in cooperation with lichenologists worldwide. The component ‘LIAS names’ is a platform for managing taxonomic names and classifications with currently >50,000 names, including the c. 12,000 accepted species and recognized synonyms. The LIAS portal contents, interfaces, and databases run on servers of the IT Center of the Bavarian Natural History Collections and are maintained there. 'LIAS names' and ‘LIAS light’ also deliver content data to the Catalogue of Life, acting as the Global Species Database (GSD) for lichens. LIAS gtm is a database for visualising the geographic distribution of lichen traits. LIAS is powered by the Diversity Workbench database framework with several interfaces for data management and publication. The LIAS long-term project was initiated in the early 1990s and has since been continued with funding from the DFG, the BMBF, and the EU.
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GnpIS is a multispecies integrative information system dedicated to plant and fungi pests. It bridges genetic and genomic data, allowing researchers access to both genetic information (e.g. genetic maps, quantitative trait loci, association genetics, markers, polymorphisms, germplasms, phenotypes and genotypes) and genomic data (e.g. genomic sequences, physical maps, genome annotation and expression data) for species of agronomical interest. GnpIS is used by both large international projects and plant science departments at the French National Institute for Agricultural Research. It is regularly improved and released several times per year. GnpIS is accessible through a web portal and allows to browse different types of data either independently through dedicated interfaces or simultaneously using a quick search ('google like search') or advanced search (Biomart, Galaxy, Intermine) tools.
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Biodiversity Maps provides access to high quality information on Ireland's biological diversity. Use the system to find out what is known about the different species that occur in Ireland, where our protected and threatened species occur, and who is recoding biodiversity. Also find out what is known about the biodiversity of your locality. The National Biodiversity Data Centre endeavours to provide high quality information through this data portal.
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DEEMY is collecting descriptive data on ectomycorrhizae, including extant character descriptions and definitions. Ectomycorrhizae are mutualistic structures formed by fungi and the roots of forest trees. They are predominantly found in the temperate and boreal climate zones but occur also in humid tropic regions, as well as in soils of poor nutrition. Without mycorrhizae, trees would not be able to take up water and minerals. Ectomycorrhizae show a wide range of anatomical diversity which represents their possible function in tree nutrition and ecology. Their anatomical data, in general, allow a quick determination and provide at the same time ecologically important information about possible functions for tree nutrition.
The Landcare Research DataStore ('the DataStore') is the general data catalogue and repository for Environmental Research Data from Landcare Research. Much of Landcare Research’s research data is available through specific web pages, but many datasets sit outside these areas. This new data repository provides a mechanism for our staff to deposit and document this wider range of datasets so that they may be discovered and potentially re-used.