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Found 61 result(s)
META-SHARE, the open language resource exchange facility, is devoted to the sustainable sharing and dissemination of language resources (LRs) and aims at increasing access to such resources in a global scale. META-SHARE is an open, integrated, secure and interoperable sharing and exchange facility for LRs (datasets and tools) for the Human Language Technologies domain and other applicative domains where language plays a critical role. META-SHARE is implemented in the framework of the META-NET Network of Excellence. It is designed as a network of distributed repositories of LRs, including language data and basic language processing tools (e.g., morphological analysers, PoS taggers, speech recognisers, etc.). Data and tools can be both open and with restricted access rights, free and for-a-fee.
The Research Collection is ETH Zurich's publication platform. It unites the functions of a university bibliography, an open access repository and a research data repository within one platform. Researchers who are affiliated with ETH Zurich, the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, may deposit research data from all domains. They can publish data as a standalone publication, publish it as supplementary material for an article, dissertation or another text, share it with colleagues or a research group, or deposit it for archiving purposes. Research-data-specific features include flexible access rights settings, DOI registration and a DOI preview workflow, content previews for zip- and tar-containers, as well as download statistics and altmetrics for published data. All data uploaded to the Research Collection are also transferred to the ETH Data Archive, ETH Zurich’s long-term archive.
The Global Hydrology Resource Center (GHRC) provides both historical and current Earth science data, information, and products from satellite, airborne, and surface-based instruments. GHRC acquires basic data streams and produces derived products from many instruments spread across a variety of instrument platforms.
BSRN is a project of the Radiation Panel (now the Data and Assessment Panel) from the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) under the umbrella of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP). It is the global baseline network for surface radiation for the Global limate Observing System (GCOS), contributing to the Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW), and forming a ooperative network with the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change NDACC).
Monash.figshare is Monash University’s institutional data repository. It allows researchers to store, manage and showcase their data while retaining control over access rights and re-use conditions. Monash.figshare offers the latest in cloud-based technology, ensures valuable research data is stored securely, and supports long-term citations with Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs).
Country
The RESIF Seismic data portal offers access to seismological and other associated geophysical data from permanent and temporary seismic networks operated all over the world by French research institutions and international partners, to support research on source processes and imaging of the Earth's interior at all scales. RESIF (French seismologic and geodetic network) is a French national equipment for the observation and understanding of the solid Earth.
ResearchWorks Archive is the University of Washington’s digital repository (also known as “institutional repository”) for disseminating and preserving scholarly work. ResearchWorks Archive can accept any digital file format or content (examples include numerical datasets, photographs and diagrams, working papers, technical reports, pre-prints and post-prints of published articles).
Country
BExIS is the online data repository and information system of the Biodiversity Exploratories Project (BE). The BE is a German network of biodiversity related working groups from areas such as vegetation and soil science, zoology and forestry. Up to three years after data acquisition, the data use is restricted to members of the BE. Thereafter, the data is usually public available (https://www.bexis.uni-jena.de/PublicData/PublicDataDefault.aspx).
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OpARA (Open Access Repository and Archive) is the repository for digital research data of the TU Dresden (TUD) and the TU Bergakademie Freiberg (TUBAF). It offers researchers the possibility of archiving their digital research data and optionally making it accessible to third parties under an Open Access license.
Brock University Dataverse, housed under the Ontario Council of University Libraries’ Scholars Portal Dataverse, is the central online repository for research data at Brock University.
The figshare service for the University of Sheffield allows researchers to store, share and publish research data. It helps the research data to be accessible by storing Metadata alongside datasets. Additionally, every uploaded item receives a Digital Object identifier (DOI), which allows the data to be citable and sustainable. If there are any ethical or copyright concerns about publishing a certain dataset, it is possible to publish the metadata associated with the dataset to help discoverability while sharing the data itself via a private channel through manual approval.
The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) improves research capacity in the Earth and Ocean sciences by maintaining an open community digital data archive for rock magnetic, geomagnetic, archeomagnetic (archaeomagnetic) and paleomagnetic (palaeomagnetic) data. Different parts of the website allow users access to archive, search, visualize, and download these data. MagIC supports the international rock magnetism, geomagnetism, archeomagnetism (archaeomagnetism), and paleomagnetism (palaeomagnetism) research and endeavors to bring data out of private archives, making them accessible to all and (re-)useable for new, creative, collaborative scientific and educational activities. The data in MagIC is used for many types of studies including tectonic plate reconstructions, geomagnetic field models, paleomagnetic field reversal studies, magnetohydrodynamical studies of the Earth's core, magnetostratigraphy, and archeology. MagIC is a domain-specific data repository and directed by PIs who are both producers and consumers of rock, geo, and paleomagnetic data. Funded by NSF since 2003, MagIC forms a major part of https://earthref.org which integrates four independent cyber-initiatives rooted in various parts of the Earth, Ocean and Life sciences and education.
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AUSSDA - The Austrian Social Science Data Archive (AUSSDA) is a core social science research infrastructure in Austria, offering research data and archiving services. It is located at the Universities of Vienna, Graz, and Linz and is funded by the Austrian Federal Ministry of Education, Science and Research (BMBWF). AUSSDA strives to become the leading research infrastructure for the social sciences in Austria, offering high quality, sustainable, and easy-to-use solutions for archiving digital data, along with world-wide access to it. The archive follows international standards in order to make deposited social science data and documentation findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable. AUSSDA is active in a growing network of national and international partners, promoting high archiving standards and contributing to archive solutions of the future. Our collection covers all social science data. We support the open data movement and work towards maximizing the potential for data use within our user group. The primary beneficiaries of our services are researchers, while our online services can also be used by students, educational institutions as well as media representatives and the public. We stand for integrity in data archiving and promote ethical research principles.
The UC San Diego Library Digital Collections website gathers two categories of content managed by the Library: library collections (including digitized versions of selected collections covering topics such as art, film, music, history and anthropology) and research data collections (including research data generated by UC San Diego researchers).
NACDA acquires and preserves data relevant to gerontological research, processing as needed to promote effective research use, disseminates them to researchers, and facilitates their use. By preserving and making available the largest library of electronic data on aging in the United States, NACDA offers opportunities for secondary analysis on major issues of scientific and policy relevance
Country
The arctic data archive system (ADS) collects observation data and modeling products obtained by various Japanese research projects and gives researchers to access the results. By centrally managing a wide variety of Arctic observation data, we promote the use of data across multiple disciplines. Researchers use these integrated databases to clarify the mechanisms of environmental change in the atmosphere, ocean, land-surface and cryosphere. That ADS will be provide an opportunity of collaboration between modelers and field scientists, can be expected.
The figshare service for The Open University was launched in 2016 and allows researchers to store, share and publish research data. It helps the research data to be accessible by storing metadata alongside datasets. Additionally, every uploaded item receives a Digital Object Identifier (DOI), which allows the data to be citable and sustainable. If there are any ethical or copyright concerns about publishing a certain dataset, it is possible to publish the metadata associated with the dataset to help discoverability while sharing the data itself via a private channel through manual approval.
EarthWorks is a discovery tool for geospatial (a.k.a. GIS) data. It allows users to search and browse the GIS collections owned by Stanford University Libraries, as well as data collections from many other institutions. Data can be searched spatially, by manipulating a map; by keyword search; by selecting search limiting facets (e.g., limit to a given format type); or by combining these options.
The Brown Digital Repository (BDR) is a place to gather, index, store, preserve, and make available digital assets produced via the scholarly, instructional, research, and administrative activities at Brown.
FORSbase is an online platform that enables you to access data and obtain information about social science studies in Switzerland. You can register your own research projects, as well as store and share your own data.
The ABCD Data Repository houses all data generated by the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study. The ABCD Study is supported by NIH partners (the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, the National Cancer Institute, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the National Institute of Mental Health, the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, the NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research, and the NIH Office of Research on Women’s Health), as well as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention – Division of Adolescent and School Health. This repository will store data generated by ABCD investigators, serve as a collaborative platform for harmonizing these data, and share those data with qualified researchers.
The Polinsky Language Sciences Lab at Harvard University is a linguistics lab that examines questions of language structure and its effect on the ways in which people use and process language in real time. We engage in linguistic and interdisciplinary research projects ourselves; offer linguistic research capabilities for undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, and visitors; and build relationships with the linguistic communities in which we do our research. We are interested in a broad range of issues pertaining to syntax, interfaces, and cross-linguistic variation. We place a particular emphasis on novel experimental evidence that facilitates the construction of linguistic theory. We have a strong cross-linguistic focus, drawing upon English, Russian, Chinese, Korean, Mayan languages, Basque, Austronesian languages, languages of the Caucasus, and others. We believe that challenging existing theories with data from as broad a range of languages as possible is a crucial component of the successful development of linguistic theory. We investigate both fluent speakers and heritage speakers—those who grew up hearing or speaking a particular language but who are now more fluent in a different, societally dominant language. Heritage languages, a novel field of linguistic inquiry, are important because they provide new insights into processes of linguistic development and attrition in general, thus increasing our understanding of the human capacity to maintain and acquire language. Understanding language use and processing in real time and how children acquire language helps us improve language study and pedagogy, which in turn improves communication across the globe. Although our lab does not specialize in language acquisition, we have conducted some studies of acquisition of lesser-studied languages and heritage languages, with the purpose of comparing heritage speakers to adults.
DR-NTU (Data) is the institutional open access research data repository for Nanyang Technological University (NTU). NTU researchers are encouraged to use DR-NTU (Data) to deposit, publish and archive their final research data in order to make their research data discoverable, accessible and reusable.
The central mission of the NACJD is to facilitate and encourage research in the criminal justice field by sharing data resources. Specific goals include providing computer-readable data for the quantitative study of crime and the criminal justice system through the development of a central data archive, supplying technical assistance in the selection of data collections and computer hardware and software for data analysis, and training in quantitative methods of social science research to facilitate secondary analysis of criminal justice data