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The Agricultural and Environmental Data Archive (AEDA) is the direct result of a project managed by the Freshwater Biological Association in partnership with the Centre for e-Research at King's College London, and funded by the Department for the Environment, Food & Rural Affairs (Defra). This project ran from January 2011 until December 2014 and was called the DTC Archive Project, because it was initially related to the Demonstration Test Catchments Platform developed by Defra. The archive was also designed to hold data from the GHG R&D Platform (www.ghgplatform.org.uk). After the DTC Archive Project was completed the finished archive was renamed as AEDA to reflect it's broader remit to archive data from any and all agricultural and environmental research activities.
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In the framework of the Collaborative Research Centre/Transregio 32 ‘Patterns in Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Systems: Monitoring, Modelling, and Data Assimilation’ (CRC/TR32, www.tr32.de), funded by the German Research Foundation from 2007 to 2018, a RDM system was self-designed and implemented. The so-called CRC/TR32 project database (TR32DB, www.tr32db.de) is operating online since early 2008. The TR32DB handles all data including metadata, which are created by the involved project participants from several institutions (e.g. Universities of Cologne, Bonn, Aachen, and the Research Centre Jülich) and research fields (e.g. soil and plant sciences, hydrology, geography, geophysics, meteorology, remote sensing). The data is resulting from several field measurement campaigns, meteorological monitoring, remote sensing, laboratory studies and modelling approaches. Furthermore, outcomes of the scientists such as publications, conference contributions, PhD reports and corresponding images are collected in the TR32DB.
The NCAR is a federally funded research and development center committed to research and education in atmospheric science and related scientific fields. NCAR seeks to support and enhance the scientific community nationally and globally by monitoring and researching the atmosphere and related physical and biological systems. Users can access climate and earth models created to better understand the atmosphere, the Earth and the Sun; as well as data from various NCAR research programs and projects. NCAR is sponsored by the National Science Foundation in addition to various other U.S. agencies.
British Antarctic Survey (BAS) has, for over 60 years, undertaken the majority of Britain's scientific research on and around the Antarctic continent. Atmospheric, biosphere, cryosphere, geosphere, hydrosphere, and Sun-Earth interactions metadata and data are available. Geographic information and collections are highlighted as well. Information and mapping services include a Discovery Metadata System, Data Access System, the Antarctic Digital Database (ADD), Geophysics Data Portal (BAS-GDP), ICEMAR, a fossil database, and the Antarctic Plant Database.
The goal of NGEE–Arctic is to reduce uncertainty in projections of future climate by developing and validating a model representation of permafrost ecosystems and incorporating that representation into Earth system models. The new modeling capabilities will improve our confidence in model projections and will enable scientist to better respond to questions about processes and interactions now and in the future. It also will allow them to better communicate important results concerning climate change to decision makers and the general public. And let's not forget about summer in the Antarctic, which happens during our winter months.