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Found 49 result(s)
The tree of life links all biodiversity through a shared evolutionary history. This project will produce the first online, comprehensive first-draft tree of all 1.8 million named species, accessible to both the public and scientific communities. Assembly of the tree will incorporate previously-published results, with strong collaborations between computational and empirical biologists to develop, test and improve methods of data synthesis. This initial tree of life will not be static; instead, we will develop tools for scientists to update and revise the tree as new data come in. Early release of the tree and tools will motivate data sharing and facilitate ongoing synthesis of knowledge.
Country
The Ningaloo Atlas was created in response to the need for more comprehensive and accessible information on environmental and socio-economic data on the greater Ningaloo region. As such, the Ningaloo Atlas is a web portal to not only access and share information, but to celebrate and promote the biodiversity, heritage, value, and way of life of the greater Ningaloo region.
With the Program EnviDat we develop a unified and managed access portal for WSL's rich reservoir of environmental monitoring and research data. EnviDat is designed as a portal to publish, connect and search across existing data but is not intended to become a large data centre hosting original data. While sharing of data is centrally facilitated, data management remains decentralised and the know-how and responsibility to curate research data remains with the original data providers.
Country
The project brings together national key players providing environmentally related biological data and services to develop the ‘German Federation for Biological Data' (GFBio). The overall goal is to provide a sustainable, service oriented, national data infrastructure facilitating data sharing and stimulating data intensive science in the fields of biological and environmental research.
The objective of this Research Coordination Network project is to develop an international network of researchers who use genetic methodologies to study the ecology and evolution of marine organisms in the Indo-Pacific to share data, ideas and methods. DIPnet was created to advance genetic diversity research in the Indo-Pacific by aggregating population genetic metadata into a searchable database (GeOME).
Country
BExIS is the online data repository and information system of the Biodiversity Exploratories Project (BE). The BE is a German network of biodiversity related working groups from areas such as vegetation and soil science, zoology and forestry. Up to three years after data acquisition, the data use is restricted to members of the BE. Thereafter, the data is usually public available (https://www.bexis.uni-jena.de/PublicData/PublicDataDefault.aspx).
Our knowledge of the many life-forms on Earth - of animals, plants, fungi, protists and bacteria - is scattered around the world in books, journals, databases, websites, specimen collections, and in the minds of people everywhere. Imagine what it would mean if this information could be gathered together and made available to everyone – anywhere – at a moment’s notice. This dream is becoming a reality through the Encyclopedia of Life.
The PLANKTON*NET data provider at the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research is an open access repository for plankton-related information. It covers all types of phytoplankton and zooplankton from marine and freshwater areas. PLANKTON*NET's greatest strength is its comprehensiveness as for the different taxa image information as well as taxonomic descriptions can be archived. PLANKTON*NET also contains a glossary with accompanying images to illustrate the term definitions. PLANKTON*NET therefore presents a vital tool for the preservation of historic data sets as well as the archival of current research results. Because interoperability with international biodiversity data providers (e.g. GBIF) is one of our aims, the architecture behind the new planktonnet@awi repository is observation centric and allows for mulitple assignment of assets (images, references, animations, etc) to any given observation. In addition, images can be grouped in sets and/or assigned tags to satisfy user-specific needs . Sets (and respective images) of relevance to the scientific community and/or general public have been assigned a persistant digital object identifier (DOI) for the purpose of long-term preservation (e.g. set ""Plankton*Net celebrates 50 years of Roman Treaties"", handle: 10013/de.awi.planktonnet.set.495)"
Country
GBIF is an international organisation that is working to make the world's biodiversity data accessible everywhere in the world. GBIF and its many partners work to mobilize the data, and to improve search mechanisms, data and metadata standards, web services, and the other components of an Internet-based information infrastructure for biodiversity. GBIF makes available data that are shared by hundreds of data publishers from around the world. These data are shared according to the GBIF Data Use Agreement, which includes the provision that users of any data accessed through or retrieved via the GBIF Portal will always give credit to the original data publishers.
The Fish Database of Taiwan is a complex of research data for about 25 years to the Lab of Fish Ecology and Evolution, which is situated in Biodiversity Research Center of Academia Sinica.
The Brain Biodiversity Bank refers to the repository of images of and information about brain specimens contained in the collections associated with the National Museum of Health and Medicine at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology in Washington, DC. These collections include, besides the Michigan State University Collection, the Welker Collection from the University of Wisconsin, the Yakovlev-Haleem Collection from Harvard University, the Meyer Collection from the Johns Hopkins University, and the Huber-Crosby and Crosby-Lauer Collections from the University of Michigan and the C.U. Ariëns Kappers brain collection from Amsterdam Netherlands.Introducing online atlases of the brains of humans, sheep, dolphins, and other animals. A world resource for illustrations of whole brains and stained sections from a great variety of mammals
Data Basin is a science-based mapping and analysis platform that supports learning, research, and sustainable environmental stewardship.
The Museum is committed to open access and open science, and has launched the Data Portal to make its research and collections datasets available online. It allows anyone to explore, download and reuse the data for their own research. Our natural history collection is one of the most important in the world, documenting 4.5 billion years of life, the Earth and the solar system. Almost all animal, plant, mineral and fossil groups are represented. These datasets will increase exponentially. Under the Museum's ambitious digital collections programme we aim to have 20 million specimens digitised in the next five years.
The Biodiversity Research Program (PPBio) was created in 2004 with the aims of furthering biodiversity studies in Brazil, decentralizing scientific production from already-developed academic centers, integrating research activities and disseminating results across a variety of purposes, including environmental management and education. PPBio contributes its data to the DataONE network as a member node: https://search.dataone.org/#profile/PPBIO
OBIS strives to document the ocean's diversity, distribution and abundance of life. Created by the Census of Marine Life, OBIS is now part of the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) of UNESCO, under its International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange (IODE) programme
The CBIF provides primary data on biological species of interest to Canadians. CBIF supports a wide range of social and economic decisions including efforts to conserve our biodiversity in healthy ecosystems, use our biological resources in sustainable ways, and monitor and control pests and diseases. Tools provided by the CBIF include the Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS), Species Access Network, Online Mapping, and the SpeciesBank, including Butterflies of Canada. The CBIF is a member of the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF).
Our research focuses mainly on the past and present bio- and geodiversity and the evolution of animals and plants. The Information Technology Center of the Staatliche Naturwissenschaftliche Sammlungen Bayerns is the institutional repository for scientific data of the SNSB. Its major tasks focus on the management of bio- and geodiversity data using different kinds of information technological structures. The facility guarantees a sustainable curation, storage, archiving and provision of such data.
Antarctic marine and terrestrial biodiversity data is widely scattered, patchy and often not readily accessible. In many cases the data is in danger of being irretrievably lost. Biodiversity.aq establishes and supports a distributed system of interoperable databases, giving easy access through a single internet portal to a set of resources relevant to research, conservation and management pertaining to Antarctic biodiversity. biodiversity.aq provides access to both marine and terrestrial Antarctic biodiversity data.
This site offers an enormous collection of photographs of wild species and natural history objects. It covers most groups of organisms with the exception of birds and other vertebrates. The photographs are presented to illustrate biodiversity and as an aid to identification. The criterion for inclusion of a species is that it must have been, or might be expected to be, found in Britain or Ireland. BioImages follows the biological classification. Biota is a hierarchical system with species grouped in genera, genera in families, families in orders and so on up to kingdoms and superkingdoms. The datasets are linked to bioinfo: food webs and species interactions in the Biodiversity of UK and Ireland.
VertNet is a NSF-funded collaborative project that makes biodiversity data free and available on the web. VertNet is a tool designed to help people discover, capture, and publish biodiversity data. It is also the core of a collaboration between hundreds of biocollections that contribute biodiversity data and work together to improve it. VertNet is an engine for training current and future professionals to use and build upon best practices in data quality, curation, research, and data publishing. Yet, VertNet is still the aggregate of all of the information that it mobilizes. To us, VertNet is all of these things and more.
TEAM is devoted to monitoring long-term trends in biodiversity, land cover change, climate and ecosystem services in tropical forests. Tropical forests received first billing because of their overwhelming significance to the global biosphere (e.g., their disproportionately large role in global carbon and energy cycles) and because of the extraordinary threats they face. About 50 percent of the species described on Earth, and an even larger proportion of species not yet described, occur in tropical forests. TEAM aims to measure and compare plants, terrestrial mammals, ground-dwelling birds and climate using a standard methodology in a range of tropical forests, from relatively pristine places to those most affected by people. TEAM currently operates in sixteen tropical forest sites across Africa, Asia and Latin America supporting a network of scientists committed to standardized methods of data collection to quantify how plants and animals respond to pressures such as climate change and human encroachment.