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Found 85 result(s)
INDEPTH is a global network of research centres that conduct longitudinal health and demographic evaluation of populations in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). INDEPTH aims to strengthen global capacity for Health and Demographic Surveillance Systems (HDSSs), and to mount multi-site research to guide health priorities and policies in LMICs, based on up-to-date scientific evidence. The data collected by the INDEPTH Network members constitute a valuable resource of population and health data for LMIC countries. This repository aims to make well documented anonymised longitudinal microdata from these Centres available to data users.
The Texas Data Repository is a platform for publishing and archiving datasets (and other data products) created by faculty, staff, and students at Texas higher education institutions. The repository is built in an open-source application called Dataverse, developed and used by Harvard University. The repository is hosted by the Texas Digital Library, a consortium of academic libraries in Texas with a proven history of providing shared technology services that support secure, reliable access to digital collections of research and scholarship. For a list of TDL participating institutions, please visit: http://tdl.org/members.
The Health and Medical Care Archive (HMCA) is the data archive of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), the largest philanthropy devoted exclusively to health and health care in the United States. Operated by the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) at the University of Michigan, HMCA preserves and disseminates data collected by selected research projects funded by the Foundation and facilitates secondary analyses of the data. Our goal is to increase understanding of health and health care in the United States through secondary analysis of RWJF-supported data collections
4TU.ResearchData, previously known as 3TU.Datacentrum, is an archive for research data. It offers the knowledge, experience and the tools to share and safely store scientific research data in a standardized, secure and well-documented manner. 4TU.Centre for Research Data provides the research community with: Advice and support on data management; A long-term archive for scientific research data; Support for current research projects; Tools for reusing research data.
The NCAA Student-Athlete Experiences Data Archive provides access to data about student athletes and will grow to include a handful of user-friendly data collections related to graduation rates; team-level Academic Progress Rates in Division I; and individual-level data on the experiences of current and former student-athletes from the NCAA's Growth, Opportunities, Aspirations and Learning of Students in college study (GOALS), and the Study of College Outcomes and Recent Experiences (SCORE). In the long run, the NCAA expects to follow this initial release with the publication of as much data as possible from its archives. The data is used by college presidents, athletic personnel, faculty, student-athlete groups, media members, and researchers in looking at issues related to intercollegiate athletics and higher education.
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Exposures in the period from conception to early childhood - including fetal growth, cell division, and organ functioning - may have long-lasting impact on health and disease susceptibility. To investigate these issues the Danish National Birth Cohort (Better health in generations) was established. A large cohort of pregnant women with long-term follow-up of the offspring was the obvious choice because many of the exposures of interest cannot be reconstructed with suffcient validity back in time. The study needed to be large, and the aim was to recruit 100,000 women early in pregnancy, and to continue follow-up for decades. Exposure information was collected by computer-assisted telephone interviews with the women twice during pregnancy and when their children were six and 18 months old. Participants were also asked to fill in a self-administered food frequency questionnaire in mid-pregnancy. Furthermore, a biological bank has been set up with blood taken from the mother twice during pregnancy and blood from theumbilical cord taken shortly after birth.
The Abacus Dataverse Network is the research data repository of the British Columbia Research Libraries' Data Services, a collaboration involving the Data Libraries at Simon Fraser University (SFU), the University of British Columbia (UBC), the University of Northern British Columbia (UNBC) and the University of Victoria (UVic).
Online storage, sharing and registration of research data, during the research period and up to the prescribed term of ten years after its completion. DataverseNL is a shared service provided by participating institutions and DANS.
York University Libraries makes available Scholars Portal Dataverse for despositing data . Scholars Portal Dataverse is a an instance of Dataverse hosted by The Ontario Council of University Libraries, of which York University Libraries is a member.
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DataverseNO is an archive platform for open research data, owned and operated by UiT The Arctic University of Norway. DataverseNO is open for researchers and organizations associated with Norwegian universities and research institutions, as well as independent researchers from Norway. All kind of open research data from all academic disciplines may be archived.
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NSD is one of the largest archives for research data of its kind and provides data to researchers and students in Norway and abroad. Additionally, NSD is a resource centre, which assists researchers with regard to data gathering, data analysis, and issues of methodology, privacy and research ethics. The main objective is to improve possibilities and working conditions for empirical research that is primarily dependent on the access to data. To fulfil this objective NSD works to reduce financial, technical, legal and administrative barriers between users and data resources.
Brock University Dataverse, housed under the Ontario Council of University Libraries’ Scholars Portal Dataverse, is the central online repository for research data at Brock University.
FORS is the Swiss Centre of Expertise in the Social Sciences. FORS implements large-scale national and international surveys, offers data and research information services to researchers and academic institutions, and conducts methodological and thematic research. DARIS is its resource centre for research and teaching in the social sciences and archives, disseminates and promotes quantitative and qualitative data . It maintains a comprehensive and up-to-date inventory of social science research projects in Switzerland. In addition, our data service makes available a wide range of datasets for secondary analysis. Databases at DARIS are: FORSbase, COMPASS
ePrints Soton is the University's Research Repository. It contains journal articles, books, PhD theses, conference papers, data, reports, working papers, art exhibitions and more. Where possible, journal articles, conference proceedings and research data made open access.
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Research Data Centres offer a secure access to detailed microdata from Statistics Canada's surveys, and to Canadian censuses' data, as well as to an increasing number of administrative data sets. The search engine was designed to help you find out more easily which dataset among all the surveys available in the RDCs best suits your research needs.
NACDA acquires and preserves data relevant to gerontological research, processing as needed to promote effective research use, disseminates them to researchers, and facilitates their use. By preserving and making available the largest library of electronic data on aging in the United States, NACDA offers opportunities for secondary analysis on major issues of scientific and policy relevance
The Health and Retirement Study (HRS) is a longitudinal panel study that surveys a representative sample of more than 26,000 Americans over the age of 50 every two years. The study has collected information about income, work, assets, pension plans, health insurance, disability, physical health and functioning, cognitive functioning, genetic information and health care expenditures.
B2FIND is a discovery service based on metadata steadily harvested from research data collections from EUDAT data centres and other repositories. The service offers faceted browsing and it allows in particular to discover data that is stored through the B2SAFE and B2SHARE services. The B2FIND service includes metadata that is harvested from many different community repositories.
The Carleton University Data Repository Dataverse is the research data repository for Carleton University. It is managed by the MacOdrum Library Systems Department in conjunction with Data Services.
CPES provides access to information that relates to mental disorders among the general population. Its primary goal is to collect data about the prevalence of mental disorders and their treatments in adult populations in the United States. It also allows for research related to cultural and ethnic influences on mental health. CPES combines the data collected in three different nationally representative surveys (National Comorbidity Survey Replication, National Survey of American Life, National Latino and Asian American Study).
ScholarsArchive@OSU is Oregon State University's digital service for gathering, indexing, making available and storing the scholarly work of the Oregon State University community. It also includes materials from outside the institution in support of the university's land, sun, sea and space grant missions and other research interests.
In keeping with the open data policies of the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Cereal Systems Initiative for South Asia (CSISA) has launched the CSISA Data Repository to ensure public accessibility to key data sets, including crop cut data- directly observed, crop yield estimates, on-station and on-farm research trial data and socioeconomic surveys. CSISA is a science-driven and impact-oriented regional initiative for increasing the productivity of cereal-based cropping systems in Bangladesh, India and Nepal, thus improving food security and farmers’ livelihoods. CSISA generates data that is of value and interest to a diverse audience of researchers, policymakers and the public. CSISA’s data repository is hosted on Dataverse, an open source web application developed at Harvard University to share, preserve, cite, explore and analyze research data. CSISA’s repository contains rich datasets, including on-station trial data from 2009–17 about crop and resource management practices for sustainable future cereal-based cropping systems. Collection of this data occurred during the long-term, on-station research trials conducted at the Indian Council of Agricultural Research – Research Complex for the Eastern Region in Bihar, India. The data include information on agronomic management for the sustainable intensification of cropping systems, mechanization, diversification, futuristic approaches to sustainable intensification, long-term effects of conservation agriculture practices on soil health and the pest spectrum. Additional trial data in the repository includes nutrient omission plot technique trials from Bihar, eastern Uttar Pradesh and Odisha, India, covering 2012–15, which help determine the indigenous nutrient supplying ability of the soil. This data helps develop precision nutrient management approaches that would be most effective in different types of soils. CSISA’s most popular dataset thus far includes crop cut data on maize in Odisha, India and rice in Nepal. Crop cut datasets provide ground-truthed yield estimates, as well as valuable information on relevant agronomic and socioeconomic practices affecting production practices and yield. A variety of research data on wheat systems are also available from Bangladesh and India. Additional crop cut data will also be coming online soon. Cropping system-related data and socioeconomic data are in the repository, some of which are cross-listed with a Dataverse run by the International Food Policy Research Institute. The socioeconomic datasets contain baseline information that is crucial for technology targeting, as well as to assess the adoption and performance of CSISA-supported technologies under smallholder farmers’ constrained conditions, representing the ultimate litmus test of their potential for change at scale. Other highly interesting datasets include farm composition and productive trajectory information, based on a 20-year panel dataset, and numerous wheat crop cut and maize nutrient omission trial data from across Bangladesh.