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Found 9 result(s)
Nuclear reaction database ENDF contains evaluated (recommended) cross sections, spectra, angular distributions, fission product yields, photo-atomic and thermal scattering law data, with emphasis on neutron induced reactions. The evaluated nuclear reaction databases, ENDF, store nuclear data from the major evaluated libraries: ENDF: Evaluated Nuclear Data File: U.S. and Canada, JEFF: Joint Evaluated Fission and Fusion File: Nuclear Energy Agency, JENDL: Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library: Japan, CENDL: China Evaluated Nuclear Data Library: China, BROND: Library of Recommended Evaluated Neutron Data: Russia. as well as various special purpose evaluated libraries.
The dbMHC database provides an open, publicly accessible platform for DNA and clinical data related to the human Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC). The dbMHC provides access to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) sequences, HLA allele and haplotype frequencies, and clinical datasets.
The Cancer Immunome Database (TCIA) provides results of comprehensive immunogenomic analyses of next generation sequencing data (NGS) data for 20 solid cancers from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and other datasource. The Cancer Immunome Atlas (TCIA) was developed and is maintained at the Division of Bioinformatics (ICBI). The database can be queried for the gene expression of specific immune-related gene sets, cellular composition of immune infiltrates (characterized using gene set enrichment analyses and deconvolution), neoantigens and cancer-germline antigens, HLA types, and tumor heterogeneity (estimated from cancer cell fractions). Moreover it provides survival analyses for different types immunological parameters. TCIA will be constantly updated with new data and results.
mzCloud is an extensively curated database of high-resolution tandem mass spectra that are arranged into spectral trees. MS/MS and multi-stage MSn spectra were acquired at various collision energies, precursor m/z, and isolation widths using Collision-induced dissociation (CID) and Higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD). Each raw mass spectrum was filtered and recalibrated giving rise to additional filtered and recalibrated spectral trees that are fully searchable. Besides the experimental and processed data, each database record contains the compound name with synonyms, the chemical structure, computationally and manually annotated fragments (peaks), identified adducts and multiply charged ions, molecular formulas, predicted precursor structures, detailed experimental information, peak accuracies, mass resolution, InChi, InChiKey, and other identifiers. mzCloud is a fully searchable library that allows spectra searches, tree searches, structure and substructure searches, monoisotopic mass searches, peak (m/z) searches, precursor searches, and name searches. mzCloud is free and available for public use online.
Nuclear Data Services contains atomic, molecular and nuclear data sets for the development and maintenance of nuclear technologies. It includes energy-dependent reaction probabilities (cross sections), the energy and angular distributions of reaction products for many combinations of target and projectile, and the atomic and nuclear properties of excited states, and their radioactive decay data. Their main concern is providing data required to design a modern nuclear reactor for electricity production. Approximately 11.5 million nuclear data points have been measured and compiled into computerized form.
The Innsbruck Dissociative Electron Attachment (DEA) DataBase node holds relative cross sections for dissociative electron attachment processes of the form: AB + e– –> A– + B, where AB is a molecule. It hence supports querying by various identifiers for molecules and atoms, such as chemical names, stoichiometric formulae, InChI (-keys) and CAS registry numbers. These identifiers are searched both in products and reactants of the processes. It then returns XSAMS files describing the processes found including numeric values for the relative cross sections of the processes. Alternatively, cross sections can be exported as plain ASCII files.
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The ord.fkp.jku.at portal offers a Data Repository of the JKUs Magnetic Oxides Group and provides access to the latest research data of the Magnetic Oxide research group of the Johannes Kepler University in Linz, Austria. The Repository contains Datasets in the following research areas: Dilute magnetic semiconductors and oxides, Ferromagnetic thin films and nanoparticles, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, Element-selective structure and magnetism, Functional heterostructures and interfaces, and Frequency-dependent magnetic resonance.
The ADAS Project is a self-funding (i.e. funded by participants) project consisting of most major fusion laboratories along with other astrophysical and university groups. As an implementation, it is an interconnected set of computer codes and data collections for modelling the radiating properties of ions and atoms in plasmas. It can address plasmas ranging from the interstellar medium through the solar atmosphere and laboratory thermonuclear fusion devices to technological plasmas. ADAS assists in the analysis and interpretation of spectral emission and supports detailed plasma models.
The THEMIS mission is a five-satellite Explorer mission whose primary objective is to understand the onset and macroscale evolution of magnetospheric substorms. The five small satellites were launched together on a Delta II rocket and they carry identical sets of instruments including an electric field instrument (EFI), a flux gate magnetometer (FGM), a search coil magnetometer (SCM), a electro-static analyzer, and solid state telescopes (SST). The mission consists of several phases. In the first phase, the spacecraft will all orbit as a tight cluster in the same orbital plane with apogee at 15.4 Earth radii (RE). In the second phase, also called the Dawn Phase, the satellites will be placed in their orbits and during this time their apogees will be on the dawn side of the magnetosphere. During the third phase (also known as the Tail Science Phase) the apogees will be in the magnetotail. The fourth phase is called the Dusk Phase or Radiation Belt Science Phase, with all apogees on the dusk side. In the fifth and final phase, the apogees will shift to the sunward side (Dayside Science Phase). The satellite data will be combined with observations of the aurora from a network of 20 ground observatories across the North American continent. The THEMIS-B (THEMIS-P1) and THEMIS-C (THEMIS-P2) were repurposed to study the lunar environment in 2009. The spacecraft were renamed ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence and Electrodynamics of the Moon’s Interaction with the Sun), with the P1 and P2 designations maintained.