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Found 254 result(s)
The European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) has a long-standing mission to collect, organise and make available databases for biomolecular science. It makes available a collection of databases along with tools to search, download and analyse their content. These databases include DNA and protein sequences and structures, genome annotation, gene expression information, molecular interactions and pathways. Connected to these are linking and descriptive data resources such as protein motifs, ontologies and many others. In many of these efforts, the EBI is a European node in global data-sharing agreements involving, for example, the USA and Japan.
The Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC) is a comprehensive clearinghouse of information about advanced transportation technologies. The AFDC offers transportation decision makers unbiased information, data, and tools related to the deployment of alternative fuels and advanced vehicles. The AFDC launched in 1991 in response to the Alternative Motor Fuels Act of 1988 and the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. It originally served as a repository for alternative fuel performance data. The AFDC has since evolved to offer a broad array of information resources that support efforts to reduce petroleum use in transportation. The AFDC serves Clean Cities stakeholders, fleets regulated by the Energy Policy Act, businesses, policymakers, government agencies, and the general public.
The EUROLAS Data Center (EDC) is one of the two data centers of the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS). It collects, archives and distributes tracking data, predictions and other tracking relevant information from the global SLR network. Additionally EDC holds a mirror of the official Web-Pages of the ILRS at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). And as result of the activities of the Analysis Working Group (AWG) of the ILRS, DGFI has been selected as analysis centers (AC) and as backup combination center (CC). This task includes weekly processing of SLR observations to LAGEOS-1/2 and ETALON-1/2 to compute station coordinates and earth orientation parameters. Additionally the combination of SLR solutions from the various analysis centres to a combinerd ILRS SLR solution.
SCEC's mission includes gathering data on earthquakes, both in Southern California and other locales; integrate the information into a comprehensive understanding of earthquake phenomena; and communicate useful knowledge for reducing earthquake risk to society at large. The SCEC community consists of more than 600 scientists from 16 core institutions and 47 additional participating institutions. SCEC is funded by the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Geological Survey.
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The majority of the CIS research activity focuses on carrying out public opinion surveys. These surveys include electoral studies, its monthly public opinion barometers, monographic studies on different aspects of Spanish society and the surveys resulting from CIS involvement in international projects. All the surveys the CIS takes are deposited in its Data Bank, and they are available to the public once the quality control, verification, anonymisation, codification and information uploading tasks have been concluded. In addition to its surveys, the CIS also collects information about Spanish society through qualitative research studies: Fundamentally, discussion groups and in-depth interviews.
Jason is a remote-controlled deep-diving vessel that gives shipboard scientists immediate, real-time access to the sea floor. Instead of making short, expensive dives in a submarine, scientists can stay on deck and guide Jason as deep as 6,500 meters (4 miles) to explore for days on end. Jason is a type of remotely operated vehicle (ROV), a free-swimming vessel connected by a long fiberoptic tether to its research ship. The 10-km (6 mile) tether delivers power and instructions to Jason and fetches data from it.
Databrary is a data library for researchers to share research data and analytical tools with other investigators. It is a web-based repository for open sharing and preservation of video data and associated metadata in the area of developmental sciences. The project aims to increase the openness in scientific research and dedicated to transforming the culture of developmental science through building a community of researchers empowering them with an unprecedented set of tools for discovery. Databry is complemented by Datavyu (an open source video-coding software) as well as Labnanny (a data management system to enable data-sharing). So any contributor can share raw digital video files, other data streams.
Through the Microsoft eScience Project, the Berkeley Water Center is developing a Water Cyberinfrastructure prototype that can be used to investigate and eventually manage water resources. The Water Cyberinfrastructure is developing in close collaboration between IT, physical science, and California water agency leaders. The value of the Cyberinfrastructure prototype will be tested through relevant end-to-end demonstration focused on important California Basins. The study region(s) are chosen based on several criteria, including availability of the data, importance of the problem that can be tackled given the cyberinfrastructure to California, leveraging opportunity, and scientific importance of the problems to be addressed. The BWC is currently building partnerships with several water representatives, such as the USGS, Sonoma County Water Agency, the Monterey County Water Resource Agency, and the NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service. Our objective with the California Water projects is to first assemble only the most critical components needed to address relevant science questions, rather than to initially create fully developed problem solving environments or construct a grand scale solution.
=== !!!!! Due to changes in technology and funding, the RAD website is no longer available !!!!! ===
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The German Socio-Economic Panel Study (SOEP) is a wide-ranging representative longitudinal study of private households, located at the German Institute for Economic Research, DIW Berlin. Every year, there were nearly 11,000 households, and more than 20,000 persons sampled by the fieldwork organization TNS Infratest Sozialforschung. The data provide information on all household members, consisting of Germans living in the Old and New German States, Foreigners, and recent Immigrants to Germany. The Panel was started in 1984. Some of the many topics include household composition, occupational biographies, employment, earnings, health and satisfaction indicators.
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C3Grid (Collaborative Climate Community Data and Processing Grid) was a common initiative of institutions of the German Climate community. Aim of the effort was to develop an infrastructure for uniform access to heterogeneous data and distributed data processing. The work was structured in two projects funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research. The first project was part of the D-Grid initiative and explored the potential of grid technology for climate research and developed a prototype infrastructure. Details about the C3Grid architecture are described in “Earth System Modelling – Volume 6”. In the second phase "C3Grid - INAD: Towards an Infrastructure for General Access to Climate Data" this infrastructure was improved especially with respect to interoperability to Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF). Further the portfolio of available diagnostic workflows was expanded. These workflows can be re-used now in adjacent infrastructures MiKlip Evaluation Tool (http://www.fona-miklip.de/en/index.php) and as Web Processes within the Birdhouse Framework (http://bird-house.github.io/). The Birdhouse Framework is now funded as part of the European Copernicus Climate Change Service (https://climate.copernicus.eu/) managed by ECMWF and will be extended to provide scalable processing services for ESGF hosted data at DKRZ as well as IPSL and BADC.
The PLANKTON*NET data provider at the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research is an open access repository for plankton-related information. It covers all types of phytoplankton and zooplankton from marine and freshwater areas. PLANKTON*NET's greatest strength is its comprehensiveness as for the different taxa image information as well as taxonomic descriptions can be archived. PLANKTON*NET also contains a glossary with accompanying images to illustrate the term definitions. PLANKTON*NET therefore presents a vital tool for the preservation of historic data sets as well as the archival of current research results. Because interoperability with international biodiversity data providers (e.g. GBIF) is one of our aims, the architecture behind the new planktonnet@awi repository is observation centric and allows for mulitple assignment of assets (images, references, animations, etc) to any given observation. In addition, images can be grouped in sets and/or assigned tags to satisfy user-specific needs . Sets (and respective images) of relevance to the scientific community and/or general public have been assigned a persistant digital object identifier (DOI) for the purpose of long-term preservation (e.g. set ""Plankton*Net celebrates 50 years of Roman Treaties"", handle: 10013/de.awi.planktonnet.set.495)"
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CHAMP (CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload) is a German small satellite mission for geoscientific and atmospheric research and applications, managed by GFZ. With its highly precise, multifunctional and complementary payload elements (magnetometer, accelerometer, star sensor, GPS receiver, laser retro reflector, ion drift meter) and its orbit characteristics (near polar, low altitude, long duration) CHAMP will generate for the first time simultaneously highly precise gravity and magnetic field measurements over a 5 years period. This will allow to detect besides the spatial variations of both fields also their variability with time. The CHAMP mission had opened a new era in geopotential research and had become a significant contributor to the Decade of Geopotentials. In addition with the radio occultation measurements onboard the spacecraft and the infrastructure developed on ground, CHAMP had become a pilot mission for the pre-operational use of space-borne GPS observations for atmospheric and ionospheric research and applications in weather prediction and space weather monitoring. End of the mission of CHAMP was at September 19 2010, after ten years, two month and four days, after 58277 orbits.
<<<<< ----- !!! The data is in the phase of migration to another system. Therefore the repository is no longer available. This record is out-dated. !!! ----- >>>>> Due to the changes at the individual IGS analysis centers during these years the resulting time series of global geodetic parameters are inhomogeneous and inconsistent. A geophysical interpretation of these long series and the realization of a high-accuracy global reference frame are therefore difficult and questionable. The GPS reprocessing project GPS-PDR (Potsdam Dresden Reprocessing), initiated by TU München and TU Dresden and continued by GFZ Potsdam and TU Dresden, provides selected products of a homogeneously reprocessed global GPS network such as GPS satellite orbits and Earth rotation parameters.
The tree of life links all biodiversity through a shared evolutionary history. This project will produce the first online, comprehensive first-draft tree of all 1.8 million named species, accessible to both the public and scientific communities. Assembly of the tree will incorporate previously-published results, with strong collaborations between computational and empirical biologists to develop, test and improve methods of data synthesis. This initial tree of life will not be static; instead, we will develop tools for scientists to update and revise the tree as new data come in. Early release of the tree and tools will motivate data sharing and facilitate ongoing synthesis of knowledge.
The Buckeye Corpus of conversational speech contains high-quality recordings from 40 speakers in Columbus OH conversing freely with an interviewer. The speech has been orthographically transcribed and phonetically labeled. The audio and text files, together with time-aligned phonetic labels, are stored in a format for use with speech analysis software (Xwaves and Wavesurfer). Software for searching the transcription files is currently being written.
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It captures and catalogues ancient human genome and microbiome data, including raw sequence and processed data, along with metadata about its provenance and production. Included datasets are generated from ancient samples studied at the Australian Centre for Ancient DNA, University of Adelaide in collaboration with other research groups. Datasets and collections in OAGR are open data resources made freely available in a reusable form, using open file formats and licensed with minimal restrictions for reuse. Digital object identifiers (DOIs) are minted for included datasets and collections to facilitate persistent identification and citation.
DataBank is a repository that will keep data safe in the long term. It can automatically obtain a Digital Object Indicator (DOI) for each data package, and make the metadata and/or the underlying data searchable and accessible by the wider world.
nanoHUB.org is the premier place for computational nanotechnology research, education, and collaboration. Our site hosts a rapidly growing collection of Simulation Programs for nanoscale phenomena that run in the cloud and are accessible through a web browser. In addition to simulation devices, nanoHUB provides Online Presentations, Courses, Learning Modules, Podcasts, Animations, Teaching Materials, and more. These resources help users learn about our simulation programs and about nanotechnology in general. Our site offers researchers a venue to explore, collaborate, and publish content, as well. Much of these collaborative efforts occur via Workspaces and User groups.
ResearchWorks Archive is the University of Washington’s digital repository (also known as “institutional repository”) for disseminating and preserving scholarly work. ResearchWorks Archive can accept any digital file format or content (examples include numerical datasets, photographs and diagrams, working papers, technical reports, pre-prints and post-prints of published articles).
Originally established in 1989 at the University of Essex to house the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS), ISER has grown into a leading centre for the production and analysis of longitudinal studies. It encompasses the ESRC Research Centre on Micro-Social Change and the successor to the BHPS, Understanding Society. As well as providing unrivalled postgraduate study opportunities, ISER also houses an internationally-renowned Microsimulation Unit which develops and runs the tax and benefit model, EUROMOD.
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data.deic.dk is an online data storage and synchronization service provided by the Danish e-Infrastructure Cooperation (DeIC), specifically aimed at researchers and scientists at Danish academic institutions. The service is primarily intended for working with and sharing active research data as well as for safekeeping of large datasets. Such data can be put in an area ('/Data') that is specifically not synced, i.e. not copied to desktops, laptops and mobile devices by the sync clients. Instead the data can be accessed and manipulated via the web interface, file transfer clients or the command line. The service is built on and with open-source software from the ground up: FreeBSD, ZFS, Apache, PHP, ownCloud+apps. DeIC is actively engaged in community efforts on developing such apps, and some are available as previews of things to come - including apps for getting large amounts of data into the system and tagging with meta-data. Our servers are attached directly to the 10-Gigabit backbone of "Forskningsnettet" - implying that wired up and download speed from Danish academic institutions is in principle comparable to those of an external USB hard drive.
The FREEBIRD website aims to facilitate data sharing in the area of injury and emergency research in a timely and responsible manner. It has been launched by providing open access to anonymised data on over 30,000 injured patients (the CRASH-1 and CRASH-2 trials).
Surrey Research Insight (SRI) is an open access resource that hosts, preserves and disseminates the full text of scholarly papers produced by members of the University of Surrey. Its main purpose is to help Surrey authors make their research more widely known; their ideas and findings readily accessible; and their papers more frequently read and cited. Surrey Research Insight (formerly Surrey Scholarship Online) was developed in line with the Open Access Initiative, promoting free access to scholarship for the benefit of authors and scholars. It is one of many open access repositories around the world that operate on agreed standards to ensure wide and timely dissemination of research.