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Found 34 result(s)
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The USC Research Bank is the institutional research repository for the University of the Sunshine Coast. It provides an open access showcase of the University's scholarly research output ensuring that research is made available to the local, national and international communities. USC Research Bank is harvested by search engines, and is also indexed by the National Library of Australia's TROVE. By making research easily accessible, it also facilitates collaboration between researchers. Where possible, access to the full text of the publication is made available, in line with copyright permissions for each output. To access relevant research, use the Browse function, or specific records can be searched for by using the search box. Find research data by filtering by resource type 'Research Dataset'.
SAHFOS is an internationally funded independent research non-profit organisation responsible for the operation of the Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR) Survey. As a large-scale global survey, it provides the scientific and policy communities with a basin-wide and long-term measure of the ecological health of marine plankton. Established in 1931, the CPR Survey is the longest running, most geographically extensive marine ecological survey in the world. It has a considerable database of marine plankton and associated metadata that is used by researchers and policy makers to examine strategically important science pillars such as climate change, human health, fisheries, biodiversity, pathogens, invasive species, ocean acidification and natural capital.
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The Atlantic Canada Conservation Data Centre (ACCDC) maintains comprehensive lists of plant and animal species. The Atlantic CDC has geo-located records of species occurrences and records of extremely rare to uncommon species in the Atlantic region, including New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland, and Labrador. The Atlantic CDC also maintains biological and other types of data in a variety of linked databases.
The objective of this Research Coordination Network project is to develop an international network of researchers who use genetic methodologies to study the ecology and evolution of marine organisms in the Indo-Pacific to share data, ideas and methods. DIPnet was created to advance genetic diversity research in the Indo-Pacific by aggregating population genetic metadata into a searchable database (GeOME).
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BExIS is the online data repository and information system of the Biodiversity Exploratories Project (BE). The BE is a German network of biodiversity related working groups from areas such as vegetation and soil science, zoology and forestry. Up to three years after data acquisition, the data use is restricted to members of the BE. Thereafter, the data is usually public available (https://www.bexis.uni-jena.de/PublicData/PublicDataDefault.aspx).
VegBank is the vegetation plot database of the Ecological Society of America's Panel on Vegetation Classification. VegBank consists of three linked databases that contain the actual plot records, vegetation types recognized in the U.S. National Vegetation Classification and other vegetation types submitted by users, and all plant taxa recognized by ITIS/USDA as well as all other plant taxa recorded in plot records. Vegetation records, community types and plant taxa may be submitted to VegBank and may be subsequently searched, viewed, annotated, revised, interpreted, downloaded, and cited. VegBank receives its data from the VegBank community of users.
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DIAS aims at collecting and storing earth observation data; analyzing such data in combination with socio-economic data, and converting data into information useful for crisis management with respect to global-scale environmental disasters, and other threats; and to make this information available within Japan and overseas.
The Environmental Data Explorer is the authoritative source for data sets used by UNEP and its partners in the Global Environment Outlook (GEO) report and other integrated environment assessments. Its online database holds more than 500 different variables, as national, subregional, regional and global statistics or as geospatial data sets (maps), covering themes like Freshwater, Population, Forests, Emissions, Climate, Disasters, Health and GDP. Display them on-the-fly as maps, graphs, data tables or download the data in different formats
TemperateReefBase is a resource for temperate reef researchers worldwide to use and contribute data. Unique in its role as a one-stop-shop for global temperate reef data, TemperateReefBase was initially established by IMAS in collaboration with the Kelp Ecology Ecosystem Network (KEEN). KEEN was instigated through a National Centre for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) working group which assembled experts from around the world to examine the impacts of global change on kelp-bed ecosystem worldwide. The group has assembled significant global data for kelps, other seaweeds and associated species including fishes, and has embarked on unprecedented global experiments and surveys in which identical experiments and surveys are being conducted at sites in kelp beds around the world to determine global trends and examine the capacity of kelps to respond to disturbance in the face of climate change and other anthropogenic stressors. The TemperateReefBase Data Portal is an online discovery interface showcasing temperate reef data collected from around the globe. The portal aims to make this data freely and openly available for the benefit of marine and environmental science as a whole. The TemperateReefBase Data Portal is hosted and maintained by the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies at the University of Tasmania, Australia.
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This portal applicaton brings together the data collected and published via OGC Web-services from the individual observatories and provides access of the data to the public. Therefore, it serves as a database node to provide scientists and decision makers with reliable and well accessible data and data products.
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Genome resource samples of wild animals, particularly those of endangered mammalian and avian species, are very difficult to collect. In Korea, many of these animals such as tigers, leopards, bears, wolves, foxes, gorals, and river otters, are either already extinct, long before the Korean biologists had the opportunity to study them, or are near extinction. Therefore, proposal for a systematic collection and preservation of genetic samples of these precious animals was adopted by Korea Science & Engineering Foundation (KOSEF). As an outcome, Conservation Genome Resource Bank for Korean Wildlife (CGRB; www.cgrb.org) was established in 2002 at the College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University as one of the Special Research Materials Bank supported by the Scientific and Research Infrastructure Building Program of KOSEF. CGRB operates in collaboration with Seoul Grand Park Zoo managed by Seoul Metropolitan Government, and has offices and laboratories at both Seoul National University and Seoul Grand Park, where duplicate samples are maintained, thereby assuring a long-term, safe preservation of the samples. Thus, CGRB is the first example of the collaborative scientific infrastructure program between university and zoo in Korea.
TEAM is devoted to monitoring long-term trends in biodiversity, land cover change, climate and ecosystem services in tropical forests. Tropical forests received first billing because of their overwhelming significance to the global biosphere (e.g., their disproportionately large role in global carbon and energy cycles) and because of the extraordinary threats they face. About 50 percent of the species described on Earth, and an even larger proportion of species not yet described, occur in tropical forests. TEAM aims to measure and compare plants, terrestrial mammals, ground-dwelling birds and climate using a standard methodology in a range of tropical forests, from relatively pristine places to those most affected by people. TEAM currently operates in sixteen tropical forest sites across Africa, Asia and Latin America supporting a network of scientists committed to standardized methods of data collection to quantify how plants and animals respond to pressures such as climate change and human encroachment.
BADGIR is an on-line data archive at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. From this portal you can browse or search data documentation (e.g., metadata, codebooks) and univariate summary statistics (e.g., mean, frequency counts). The database contains documented survey results from various survey-research projects in the US, Central America, and South America. Some historical datasets also (e.g. of slave-trade records).
The British Geological Survey (BGS), the world’s oldest national geological survey, has over 400 datasets including environmental monitoring data, digital databases, physical collections (borehole core, rocks, minerals and fossils), records and archives.
The California Coastal Atlas is an experiment in the creation of a new information resource for the description, analysis and understanding of natural and human processes affecting the coast of California.
The NCEAS Data Repository contains information about the research data sets collected and collated as part of NCEAS' funded activities. Information in the NCEAS Data Repository is concurrently available through the Knowledge Network for Biocomplexity (KNB), an international data repository. A number of the data sets were synthesized from multiple data sources that originated from the efforts of many contributors, while others originated from a single. Datasets can be found at KNB repository https://knb.ecoinformatics.org/data , creator=NCEAS
The Andrews Forest is a place of inquiry. Our mission is to support research on forests, streams, and watersheds, and to foster strong collaboration among ecosystem science, education, natural resource management, and the humanities. Our place and our work are administered cooperatively by the USDA Forest Service's Pacific Northwest Research Station, Oregon State University, and the Willamette National Forest. First established in 1948 as an US Forest Service Experimental Forest, the H.J. Andrews is a 16,000-acre ecological research site in Oregon's beautiful western Cascades Mountains. The landscape is home to iconic Pacific Northwest old-growth forests of Cedar and Hemlock, and moss-draped ancient Douglas Firs; steep terrain; and fast, cold-running streams. In 1980 the Andrews became a charter member of the National Science Foundation's Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Program.
This database is a global archive and describes plant traits from throughout the globe. TRY is a network of vegetation scientists headed by DIVERSITAS, IGBP, iDiv, the Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry and an international Advisory Board. About half of the data are geo-referenced, providing a global coverage of more than 8000 measurement sites.