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Nuclear reaction database ENDF contains evaluated (recommended) cross sections, spectra, angular distributions, fission product yields, photo-atomic and thermal scattering law data, with emphasis on neutron induced reactions. The evaluated nuclear reaction databases, ENDF, store nuclear data from the major evaluated libraries: ENDF: Evaluated Nuclear Data File: U.S. and Canada, JEFF: Joint Evaluated Fission and Fusion File: Nuclear Energy Agency, JENDL: Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library: Japan, CENDL: China Evaluated Nuclear Data Library: China, BROND: Library of Recommended Evaluated Neutron Data: Russia. as well as various special purpose evaluated libraries.
The Harvard Dataverse is open to all scientific data from all disciplines worldwide. It includes the world's largest collection of social science research data. It is hosting data for projects, archives, researchers, journals, organizations, and institutions.
The EXFOR library contains an extensive compilation of experimental nuclear reaction data. Neutron reactions have been compiled systematically since the discovery of the neutron, while charged particle and photon reactions have been covered less extensively.
The Open Science Framework (OSF) is part network of research materials, part version control system, and part collaboration software. The purpose of the software is to support the scientist's workflow and help increase the alignment between scientific values and scientific practices. Document and archive studies. Move the organization and management of study materials from the desktop into the cloud. Labs can organize, share, and archive study materials among team members. Web-based project management reduces the likelihood of losing study materials due to computer malfunction, changing personnel, or just forgetting where you put the damn thing. Share and find materials. With a click, make study materials public so that other researchers can find, use and cite them. Find materials by other researchers to avoid reinventing something that already exists. Detail individual contribution. Assign citable, contributor credit to any research material - tools, analysis scripts, methods, measures, data. Increase transparency. Make as much of the scientific workflow public as desired - as it is developed or after publication of reports. Find public projects here. Registration. Registering materials can certify what was done in advance of data analysis, or confirm the exact state of the project at important points of the lifecycle such as manuscript submission or at the onset of data collection. Discover public registrations here. Manage scientific workflow. A structured, flexible system can provide efficiency gain to workflow and clarity to project objectives, as pictured.