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Found 11 result(s)
Physical Reference Data compiles physical data and biblographic sources: Physical constants, atomic spectroscopy data, molecular spectroscopic data, X-Ray and Gamma-Ray data, nuclear physics data etc.
In February 1986 the NIST measurements were communicated to appropriate astronomers for use in ground-based testing and calibration programs for the GHRS, and in 1990 the NIST group published the new wavelengths for about 3000 lines in the Supplement Series of the Astrophysical Journal. The full report on the NIST measurements in the form of a complete and detailed atlas of the platinum/neon spectrum presented in this special issue of the Journal of Research of NIST will be highly useful to a wide range of scientists.
The HEASARC is a multi-mission astronomy archive for the EUV, X-ray, and Gamma ray wave bands. Because EUV, X and Gamma rays cannot reach the Earth's surface it is necessary to place the telescopes and sensors on spacecraft. The HEASARC now holds the data from 25 observatories covering over 30 years of X-ray, extreme-ultraviolet and gamma-ray astronomy. Data and software from many of the older missions were restored by the HEASARC staff. Examples of these archived missions include ASCA, BeppoSAX, Chandra, Compton GRO, HEAO 1, Einstein Observatory (HEAO 2), EUVE, EXOSAT, HETE-2, INTEGRAL, ROSAT, Rossi XTE, Suzaku, Swift, and XMM-Newton.
The atomic line data used in this database are taken from Bob Kurucz' CD-ROM 23 of spectroscopic line calculations. The database contains all lines of the file "gfall.dat" with the following items for each line: Wavelength; loggf; element code; lower level: energy, J, configuration; upper level: energy, J, configuration; gamma r; gamma s; gamma w; reference code. CD-ROM 23 has all the atomic line data with good wavelengths in one large file and in one file for each species. The big file is also divided into 10 nm and 100 nm sections for convenience. Also given are hyperfine line lists for neutral Sc, V, Mn, and Co that were produced by splitting all the energy levels for which laboratory data are available (only a small fraction).
The Atomic Data for Astrophysics server provides links to basic atomic data required for calculation of the ionization state of astrophysical plasmas and for quantitative spectroscopy.
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SIMBAD astronomical database is the world reference database for the identification of astronomical objects and provides basic data, cross-identifications, bibliography and measurements for astronomical objects outside the solar system. Using VizieR, the catalogue service for the CDS reference collection of astronomical catalogues and tables published in academic journals and the Aladin interactive software sky atlas for access, visualization and analysis of astronomical images, surveys, catalogues, databases and related data. Simbad bibliographic survey began in 1950 for stars (at least bright stars) and in 1983 for all other objects (outside the solar system)
This is a compilation of approximately 923,000 allowed, intercombination and forbidden atomic transitions with wavelengths in the range from 0.5 Å to 1000 µm. It's primary intention is to allow the identification of observed atomic absorption or emission features. The wavelengths in this list are all calculated from the difference between the energy of the upper and lower level of the transition. No attempt has been made to include observed wavelengths. Most of the atomic energy level data have been taken from the Atomic Spectra Database provided by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).
This facility permits selective searches of some atomic data files compiled by R. L. Kurucz (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics). The data provided are: - vacuum wavelength (in nm) [above 200 nm calculated using Edlen, Metrologia, Vol. 2, No. 2, 1966]- air wavelength (in nm) above 200 nm- log(gf), - E [in cm-1], j, parity, and configuration for the levels (lower, upper), - information regarding the source of the data. CD-ROM 18 contains the spectrum synthesis programs ATLAS7V, SYNTHE, SPECTRV, ROTATE, BROADEN, PLOTSYN, etc. and sample runs found in directory PROGRAMS; Atomic line data files BELLHEAVY.DAT, BELLLIGHT.DAT, GFIRONLAB.DAT, GULLIVER.DAT, NLTELINES.DAT, GFIRONQ.DAT, obsolete, merged into GFALL, found in directory LINELISTS: Molecular line data files C2AX.ASC, C2BA.ASC, C2DA.ASC, C2EA.ASC, CNAX.ASC, CNBX.ASC, COAX.ASC, COXX.ASC, H2.ASC, HYDRIDES.ASC, SIOAX.ASC, SIOEX.ASC, SIOXX.ASC, found in directory LINELISTS; and my solar flux atlas for test calculations SOLARFLUX.ASC.