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The Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) is designed to provide detailed infrared properties of selected Galactic and extragalactic sources. The sensitivity of the telescopic system is about one thousand times superior to that of the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS), since the ISO telescope enables integration of infrared flux from a source for several hours. Density waves in the interstellar medium, its role in star formation, the giant planets, asteroids, and comets of the solar system are among the objects of investigation. ISO was operated as an observatory with the majority of its observing time being distributed to the general astronomical community. One of the consequences of this is that the data set is not homogeneous, as would be expected from a survey. The observational data underwent sophisticated data processing, including validation and accuracy analysis. In total, the ISO Data Archive contains about 30,000 standard observations, 120,000 parallel, serendipity and calibration observations and 17,000 engineering measurements. In addition to the observational data products, the archive also contains satellite data, documentation, data of historic aspects and externally derived products, for a total of more than 400 GBytes stored on magnetic disks. The ISO Data Archive is constantly being improved both in contents and functionality throughout the Active Archive Phase, ending in December 2006.
The European Space Agency's (ESA) X-ray Multi-Mirror Mission (XMM-Newton) was launched by an Ariane 504 on December 10th 1999. XMM-Newton is ESA's second cornerstone of the Horizon 2000 Science Programme. It carries 3 high throughput X-ray telescopes with an unprecedented effective area, and an optical monitor, the first flown on a X-ray observatory. The large collecting area and ability to make long uninterrupted exposures provide highly sensitive observations.
The Earth Orientation Centre is responsible for monitoring of long-term earth orientation parameters, publications for time dissemination and leap second announcements.
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VSSO collects and provides Space science data from Chinese missions. Chinese Space Science Center is a member of ICSU World Data System
The SAR Data Center has a large data archive of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) from a variety of sensors available at no cost. Much of the SAR data in the ASF SDC archive is limited in distribution to the scientific research community and U.S. Government Agencies. In accordance with the Memoranda of Understanding (MOU) between the relevant flight agencies (CSA, ESA, JAXA) and the U.S. State Department, the ASF SDC does not distribute SAR data for commercial use. The research community can access the data (ERS-1, ERS-2, JERS-1, RADARSAT-1, and ALOS PALSAR) via a brief proposal process.
Earthdata powered by EOSDIS (Earth Observing System Data and Information System) is a key core capability in NASA’s Earth Science Data Systems Program. It provides end-to-end capabilities for managing NASA’s Earth science data from various sources – satellites, aircraft, field measurements, and various other programs. EOSDIS uses the metadata and service discovery tool Earthdata Search https://search.earthdata.nasa.gov/. The capabilities of EOSDIS constituting the EOSDIS Science Operations are managed by NASA's Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) Project. The capabilities include: generation of higher level (Level 1-4) science data products for several satellite missions; archiving and distribution of data products from Earth observation satellite missions, as well as aircraft and field measurement campaigns. The EOSDIS science operations are performed within a distributed system of many interconnected nodes - Science Investigator-led Processing Systems (SIPS), and distributed, discipline-specific, Earth science Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) with specific responsibilities for production, archiving, and distribution of Earth science data products. The DAACs serve a large and diverse user community by providing capabilities to search and access science data products and specialized services.
Spitzer is the final mission in NASA's Great Observatories Program - a family of four orbiting observatories, each observing the Universe in a different kind of light (visible, gamma rays, X-rays, and infrared). Spitzer is also a part of NASA's Astronomical Search for Origins Program, designed to provide information which will help us understand our cosmic roots, and how galaxies, stars and planets develop and form.
The Crustal Dynamics Data Information System (CDDIS) was initially developed to provide a central data bank for NASA's Crustal Dynamics Project (CDP). The Crustal Dynamics Data Information System (CDDIS) supports data archiving and distribution activities for the space geodesy and geodynamics community. The main objectives of the system are to store space geodesy and geodynamics related data products in a central data bank, to maintain information about the archival of these data, and to disseminate these data and information in a timely manner to NASA investigators and cooperating institutions.
Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center is a remotely sensed data management, systems development, and research field center for the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Climate and Land Use Change Mission Area. The USGS is a bureau of the U.S. Department of the Interior. It currently houses one of the largest computer complexes in the Department of the Interior. EROS has approximately 600 government and contractor employees.