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Found 16 result(s)
The tree of life links all biodiversity through a shared evolutionary history. This project will produce the first online, comprehensive first-draft tree of all 1.8 million named species, accessible to both the public and scientific communities. Assembly of the tree will incorporate previously-published results, with strong collaborations between computational and empirical biologists to develop, test and improve methods of data synthesis. This initial tree of life will not be static; instead, we will develop tools for scientists to update and revise the tree as new data come in. Early release of the tree and tools will motivate data sharing and facilitate ongoing synthesis of knowledge.
Country
DEG hosts records of currently available essential genomic elements, such as protein-coding genes and non-coding RNAs, among bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes. Essential genes in a bacterium constitute a minimal genome, forming a set of functional modules, which play key roles in the emerging field, synthetic biology.
Country
The Portal of Genomic Data is an initiative of the National System of Genomic Data (SNDG) of the Ministry of Science, Technology and Productive Innovation of Argentina whose purpose is to visualize, share, disseminate and return to society the primary data that are generated as a result of the investigations financed by the National State. The site allows access to the unified national database of genomic information for all species of ecological, agricultural, biotechnological and health interest; have information from the centers affiliated to the SNDG and their data sets and tools; know the main SNDG statistics; and visualize and / or download the available resources.
The Gene database provides detailed information for known and predicted genes defined by nucleotide sequence or map position. Gene supplies gene-specific connections in the nexus of map, sequence, expression, structure, function, citation, and homology data. Unique identifiers are assigned to genes with defining sequences, genes with known map positions, and genes inferred from phenotypic information. These gene identifiers are used throughout NCBI's databases and tracked through updates of annotation. Gene includes genomes represented by NCBI Reference Sequences (or RefSeqs) and is integrated for indexing and query and retrieval from NCBI's Entrez and E-Utilities systems.
WFCC Global Catalogue of Microorganisms (GCM) is expected to be a robust, reliable and user-friendly system to help culture collections to manage, disseminate and share the information related to their holdings. It also provides a uniform interface for the scientific and industrial communities to access the comprehensive microbial resource information.
OrtholugeDB contains Ortholuge-based orthology predictions for completely sequenced bacterial and archaeal genomes. It is also a resource for reciprocal best BLAST-based ortholog predictions, in-paralog predictions (recently duplicated genes) and ortholog groups in Bacteria and Archaea. The Ortholuge method improves the specificity of high-throughput orthology prediction.
Greengenes is an Earth Sciences website that assists clinical and environmental microbiologists from around the globe in classifying microorganisms from their local environments. A 16S rRNA gene database addresses limitations of public repositories by providing chimera screening, standard alignment, and taxonomic classification using multiple published taxonomies.
BEI Resources was established by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) to provide reagents, tools and information for studying Category A, B, and C priority pathogens, emerging infectious disease agents, non-pathogenic microbes and other microbiological materials of relevance to the research community. BEI Resources acquires authenticates, and produces reagents that scientists need to carry out basic research and develop improved diagnostic tests, vaccines, and therapies. By centralizing these functions within BEI Resources, access to and use of these materials in the scientific community is monitored and quality control of the reagents is assured
PHI-base is a web-accessible database that catalogues experimentally verified pathogenicity, virulence and effector genes from fungal, Oomycete and bacterial pathogens, which infect animal, plant, fungal and insect hosts. PHI-base is therfore an invaluable resource in the discovery of genes in medically and agronomically important pathogens, which may be potential targets for chemical intervention. In collaboration with the FRAC team, PHI-base also includes antifungal compounds and their target genes.
Pathogen Portal is a repository linking to the Bioinformatics Resource Centers (BRCs) sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and maintained by The Virginia Bioinformatics Institute. The BRCs are providing web-based resources to scientific community conducting basic and applied research on organisms considered potential agents of biowarfare or bioterrorism or causing emerging or re-emerging diseases. The Pathogen Portal supports and links to five Bioinformatics Resource Centers (BRCs). Each BRC specializes in a different group of pathogens, focusing on, but not limited to, pathogens causing (Re-)Emerging Infectious Diseases, and those in the NIAID Category A-C Priority Pathogen lists for biodefense research. The scope of the BRCs also includes Invertebrate Vectors of Human Disease. Pathogen Portal covers EuPathDB, IRD, PATRIC, VectorBase and ViPR.
Country
The DSMZ is one of the largest biological ressource centers worldwide.Its collections currently comprise more than 50,000 items, including about 27,000 different bacterial and 4,000 fungal strains, 800 human and animal cell lines, 700 plant cell lines, 1,400 plant viruses and antisera, and 13,000 different types of bacterial genomic DNA.. All biological materials accepted in the DSMZ collection are subject to extensive quality control and physiological and molecular characterization by our central services. In addition, DSMZ provides an extensive documentation and detailed diagnostic information on the biological materials. The unprecedented diversity and quality management of its bioressources render the DSMZ an internationally reknown supplier for science, diagnostic laboratories, national reference centers, as well as industrial partners.
The PATRIC website provides an entry point to integrated data and tools for bacterial infectious disease research. The website is organized by data types and analysis tools. Primary access is provided through the PATRIC main menu, available at the top of the home page.
The NCBI Trace Archive is a permanent repository of DNA sequence chromatograms (traces), base calls, and quality estimates for single-pass reads from various large-scale sequencing projects. The Trace Archive serves as the repository of sequencing data from gel/capillary platforms such as Applied Biosystems ABI 3730®. The Sequence Read Archive (SRA) stores sequencing data from the next generation of sequencing platforms including Roche 454 GS System®, Illumina Genome Analyzer®, Applied Biosystems SOLiD® System, Helicos Heliscope®, and others. The Trace Assembly Archive stores pairwise alignment and multiple alignment of sequencing reads, linking basic trace data with finished genomic sequence.
The Antimicrobial Peptide Database (APD) was originally created by a graduate student, Zhe Wang, as his master's thesis in the laboratory of Dr. Guangshun Wang. The project was initiated in 2002 and the first version of the database was open to the public in August 2003. It contained 525 peptide entries, which can be searched in multiple ways, including APD ID, peptide name, amino acid sequence, original location, PDB ID, structure, methods for structural determination, peptide length, charge, hydrophobic content, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anticancer, and hemolytic activity. Some results of this bioinformatics tool were reported in the 2004 database paper. The peptide data stored in the APD were gleaned from the literature (PubMed, PDB, Google, and Swiss-Prot) manually in over a decade.