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Found 13 result(s)
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Since the first discovery of RNA pseudoknots more and many more pseudoknots have been found. However, not all of those pseudoknot data are easy to trace. Sometimes the information is hidden in a publication where the title gives no hint that pseudoknot information is there. This was the first reason that we thought that a general accessible information source for pseudoknots would be handy.
IntEnz contains the recommendation of the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology on the nomenclature and classification of enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Users can browse by enzyme classification or use advanced search options to search enzymes by class, subclass and sub-subclass information.
dictyBase is an integrated genetic and literature database that contains published Dictyostelium discoideum literature, genes, expressed sequence tags (ESTs), as well as the chromosomal and mitochondrial genome sequences. Direct access to the genome browser, a Blast search tool, the Dictyostelium Stock Center, research tools, colleague databases, and much much more are just a mouse click away. Dictybase is a genome portal for the Amoebozoa. dictyBase is funded by a grant from the National Institute for General Medical Sciences.
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The Taenia solium genome project is a whole genome sequencing project of the parasite Taenia solium, the causal agent of human and porcine cysticercosis; a disease that is still a public health problem of relevance in Mexico. It is being carried out by a consortium of scientists belonging to diverse institutions of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM, the National Autonomous University of Mexico).
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The Small Molecule Pathway Database (SMPDB) contains small molecule pathways found in humans, which are presented visually. All SMPDB pathways include information on the relevant organs, subcellular compartments, protein cofactors, protein locations, metabolite locations, chemical structures and protein quaternary structures. Accompanying data includes detailed descriptions and references, providing an overview of the pathway, condition or processes depicted in each diagram.
This site provides access to complete, annotated genomes from bacteria and archaea (present in the European Nucleotide Archive) through the Ensembl graphical user interface (genome browser). Ensembl Bacteria contains genomes from annotated INSDC records that are loaded into Ensembl multi-species databases, using the INSDC annotation import pipeline.
The FAIRDOMHub is built upon the SEEK software suite, which is an open source web platform for sharing scientific research assets, processes and outcomes. FAIRDOM (Web Site) will establish a support and service network for European Systems Biology. It will serve projects in standardizing, managing and disseminating data and models in a FAIR manner: Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable. FAIRDOM is an initiative to develop a community, and establish an internationally sustained Data and Model Management service to the European Systems Biology community. FAIRDOM is a joint action of ERA-Net EraSysAPP and European Research Infrastructure ISBE.
MetaCyc is a curated database of experimentally elucidated metabolic pathways from all domains of life. MetaCyc contains pathways involved in both primary and secondary metabolism, as well as associated metabolites, reactions, enzymes, and genes. The goal of MetaCyc is to catalog the universe of metabolism by storing a representative sample of each experimentally elucidated pathway. MetaCyc applications include: Online encyclopedia of metabolism, Prediction of metabolic pathways in sequenced genomes, Support metabolic engineering via enzyme database, Metabolite database aids. metabolomics research.
Rhea is a freely available and comprehensive resource of expert-curated biochemical reactions. It has been designed to provide a non-redundant set of chemical transformations for applications such as the functional annotation of enzymes, pathway inference and metabolic network reconstruction. There are three types of reaction participants (reactants and products): Small molecules, Rhea polymers, Generic compounds. All three types of reaction participants are linked to the ChEBI database (Chemical Entities of Biological Interest) which provides detailed information about structure, formula and charge. Rhea provides built-in validations that ensure both mass and charge balance of the reactions. We have populated the database with the reactions found in the enzyme classification (i.e. in the IntEnz and ENZYME databases), extending it with additional known reactions of biological interest. While the main focus of Rhea is enzyme-catalysed reactions, other biochemical reactions (including those that are often termed "spontaneous") also are included.
MetaboLights is a database for Metabolomics experiments and derived information. The database is cross-species, cross-technique and covers metabolite structures and their reference spectra as well as their biological roles, locations and concentrations, and experimental data from metabolic experiments.
This is CSDB version 1 merged from Bacterial (BCSDB) and Plant&Fungal (PFCSDB) databases. This database aims at provision of structural, bibliographic, taxonomic, NMR spectroscopic and other information on glycan and glycoconjugate structures of prokaryotic, plant and fungal origin. It has been merged from the Bacterial and Plant&Fungal Carbohydrate Structure Databases (BCSDB+PFCSDB). The key points of this service are: High coverage. The coverage for bacteria (up to 2016) and archaea (up to 2016) is above 80%. Similar coverage for plants and fungi is expected in the future. The database is close to complete up to 1998 for plants, and up to 2006 for fungi. Data quality. High data quality is achieved by manual curation using original publications which is assisted by multiple automatic procedures for error control. Errors present in publications are reported and corrected, when possible. Data from other databases are verified on import. Detailed annotations. Structural data are supplied with extended bibliography, assigned NMR spectra, taxon identification including strains and serogroups, and other information if available in the original publication. Services. CSDB serves as a platform for a number of computational services tuned for glycobiology, such as NMR simulation, automated structure elucidation, taxon clustering, 3D molecular modeling, statistical processing of data etc. Integration. CSDB is cross-linked to other glycoinformatics projects and NCBI databases. The data are exportable in various formats, including most widespread encoding schemes and records using GlycoRDF ontology. Free web access. Users can access the database for free via its web interface (see Help). The main source of data is retrospective literature analysis. About 20% of data were imported from CCSD (Carbbank, University of Georgia, Athens; structures published before 1996) with subsequent manual curation and approval. The current coverage is displayed in red on the top of the left menu. The time lag between the publication of new data and their deposition into CSDB is ca. 1 year. In the scope of bacterial carbohydrates, CSDB covers nearly all structures of this origin published up to 2016. Prokaryotic, plant and fungal means that a glycan was found in the organism(s) belonging to these taxonomic domains or was obtained by modification of those found in them. Carbohydrate means a structure composed of any residues linked by glycosidic, ester, amidic, ketal, phospho- or sulpho-diester bonds in which at least one residue is a sugar or its derivative.