Filter
Reset all

Subjects

Content Types

Countries

AID systems

API

Data access

Data access restrictions

Database access

Database access restrictions

Database licenses

Data licenses

Data upload

Data upload restrictions

Enhanced publication

Institution responsibility type

Institution type

Keywords

Metadata standards

PID systems

Provider types

Quality management

Repository languages

Software

Syndications

Repository types

Versioning

  • * at the end of a keyword allows wildcard searches
  • " quotes can be used for searching phrases
  • + represents an AND search (default)
  • | represents an OR search
  • - represents a NOT operation
  • ( and ) implies priority
  • ~N after a word specifies the desired edit distance (fuzziness)
  • ~N after a phrase specifies the desired slop amount
  • 1 (current)
Found 16 result(s)
Country
The Human Genetic Variation Database (HGVD) aims to provide a central resource to archive and display Japanese genetic variation and association between the variation and transcription level of genes. The database currently contains genetic variations determined by exome sequencing of 1,208 individuals and genotyping data of common variations obtained from a cohort of 3,248 individuals.
DNASU is a central repository for plasmid clones and collections. Currently we store and distribute over 200,000 plasmids including 75,000 human and mouse plasmids, full genome collections, the protein expression plasmids from the Protein Structure Initiative as the PSI: Biology Material Repository (PSI : Biology-MR), and both small and large collections from individual researchers. We are also a founding member and distributor of the ORFeome Collaboration plasmid collection.
METLIN represents the largest MS/MS collection of data with the database generated at multiple collision energies and in positive and negative ionization modes. The data is generated on multiple instrument types including SCIEX, Agilent, Bruker and Waters QTOF mass spectrometers.
The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Data Portal provides a platform for researchers to search, download, and analyze data sets generated by TCGA. It contains clinical information, genomic characterization data, and high level sequence analysis of the tumor genomes. The Data Coordinating Center (DCC) is the central provider of TCGA data. The DCC standardizes data formats and validates submitted data.
ALSPAC is a longitudinal birth cohort study which enrolled pregnant women who were resident in one of three Bristol-based health districts in the former County of Avon with an expected delivery date between 1st April 1991 and 31st December 1992. Around 14,000 pregnant women were initially recruited. Detailed information has been collected on these women, their partners and subsequent children using self-completion questionnaires, data extraction from medical notes, linkage to routine information systems and from hands-on research clinics. Additional cohorts of participants have since been enrolled in their own right including fathers, siblings, children of the children and grandparents of the children. Ethical approval for the study was obtained from the ALSPAC Ethics and Law Committee (IRB00003312) and Local Research Ethics.
Gemma is a database for the meta-analysis, re-use and sharing of genomics data, currently primarily targeted at the analysis of gene expression profiles. Gemma contains data from thousands of public studies, referencing thousands of published papers. Users can search, access and visualize co-expression and differential expression results.
TriTrypDB is an integrated genomic and functional genomic database for pathogens of the family Trypanosomatidae, including organisms in both Leishmania and Trypanosoma genera. TriTrypDB and its continued development are possible through the collaborative efforts between EuPathDB, GeneDB and colleagues at the Seattle Biomedical Research Institute (SBRI).
The NCI’s Cancer Genome Anatomy Project (CGAP) is an online resource designed to provide the scientific community with detailed characterization of gene expression in biological tissues. By characterizing normal, pre-cancer and cancer cells, CGAP aims to improve detection, diagnosis and treatment for the patient. Moreover, CGAP provides access to cDNA clones to the research community through a variety of distributors. CGAP provides a wide range of genomic data and resources
>>>>!!!!<<<< The Cancer Genomics Hub mission is now completed. The Cancer Genomics Hub was established in August 2011 to provide a repository to The Cancer Genome Atlas, the childhood cancer initiative Therapeutically Applicable Research to Generate Effective Treatments and the Cancer Genome Characterization Initiative. CGHub rapidly grew to be the largest database of cancer genomes in the world, storing more than 2.5 petabytes of data and serving downloads of nearly 3 petabytes per month. As the central repository for the foundational genome files, CGHub streamlined team science efforts as data became as easy to obtain as downloading from a hard drive. The convenient access to Big Data, and the collaborations that CGHub made possible, are now essential to cancer research. That work continues at the NCI's Genomic Data Commons. All files previously stored at CGHub can be found there. The Website for the Genomic Data Commons is here: https://gdc.nci.nih.gov/ >>>>!!!!<<<< The Cancer Genomics Hub (CGHub) is a secure repository for storing, cataloging, and accessing cancer genome sequences, alignments, and mutation information from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) consortium and related projects. Access to CGHub Data: All researchers using CGHub must meet the access and use criteria established by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to ensure the privacy, security, and integrity of participant data. CGHub also hosts some publicly available data, in particular data from the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia. All metadata is publicly available and the catalog of metadata and associated BAMs can be explored using the CGHub Data Browser.
The National Database for Autism Research (NDAR) is an NIH-funded research data repository that aims to accelerate progress in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) research through data sharing, data harmonization, and the reporting of research results. NDAR also serves as a scientific community platform and portal to multiple other research repositories, allowing for aggregation and secondary analysis of data. NDAR combines the function of a data repository, which holds genetic, phenotypic, clinical, and medical imaging data, and the function of a scientific community platform, which defines the standard tools and policies to integrate the computational resources developed by scientific research institutions, private foundations, and other federal and state agencies supporting ASD research. Furthermore, NDAR is working to develop the means to connect relevant repositories together through data federation.
The European Genome-phenome Archive (EGA) is designed to be a repository for all types of sequence and genotype experiments, including case-control, population, and family studies. We will include SNP and CNV genotypes from array based methods and genotyping done with re-sequencing methods. The EGA will serve as a permanent archive that will archive several levels of data including the raw data (which could, for example, be re-analysed in the future by other algorithms) as well as the genotype calls provided by the submitters. We are developing data mining and access tools for the database. For controlled access data, the EGA will provide the necessary security required to control access, and maintain patient confidentiality, while providing access to those researchers and clinicians authorised to view the data. In all cases, data access decisions will be made by the appropriate data access-granting organisation (DAO) and not by the EGA. The DAO will normally be the same organisation that approved and monitored the initial study protocol or a designate of this approving organisation. The European Genome-phenome Archive (EGA) allows you to explore datasets from genomic studies, provided by a range of data providers. Access to datasets must be approved by the specified Data Access Committee (DAC).
!!!Sprry.we are no longer in operation!!! The Beta Cell Biology Consortium (BCBC) was a team science initiative that was established by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). It was initially funded in 2001 (RFA DK-01-014), and competitively continued both in 2005 (RFAs DK-01-17, DK-01-18) and in 2009 (RFA DK-09-011). Funding for the BCBC came to an end on August 1, 2015, and with it so did our ability to maintain active websites.!!! One of the many goals of the BCBC was to develop and maintain databases of useful research resources. A total of 813 different scientific resources were generated and submitted by BCBC investigators over the 14 years it existed. Information pertaining to 495 selected resources, judged to be the most scientifically-useful, has been converted into a static catalog, as shown below. In addition, the metadata for these 495 resources have been transferred to dkNET in the form of RDF descriptors, and all genomics data have been deposited to either ArrayExpress or GEO. Please direct questions or comments to the NIDDK Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology & Metabolic Diseases (DEM).
The project aims to examine and index the genomic diversity through the generation of complete mitochondrial and nuclear genome sequences of sharks and rays of the Pacific Rim. There is a huge diversity of elasmobranch fishes in this region, but many species are under threat because of poor management and conservation measures in many countries. It is absolutely critical that species’ identities are correct for conservation and fisheries management purposes. This project will provide this clarity of identity for both charismatic and commercially important species through the inclusion of ‘genetypes’ (ie., BioVouchers) and the application of genetic tools that utilize whole mitochondrial and nuclear genome sequences.
Country
The mission of the platform is to enable access for academic projects towards experiments in high-throughput without loss of IP and on a cost basis, which does not restrict access towards HTS usage. The FMP hosts the central open access technology platform of EU-OPENSCREEN, the ChemBioNet and theHelmholtz-Initiative für Wirkstoffforschung, the Screening Unit. The Unit serves for systematic screening of large compound or genome-wide RNAi libraries with state-of-the-art equipment like automated microscopes and microfluidic systems. The Screening Unit is part of the Chemical Biology Platform of the FMP also supported by the MDC.
>>>!!<<<This is an archive of the old NEBC site from nebc.nerc.ac.uk and is no longer updated. For new information regarding NERC Environmental Omics and the Bio-Linux system please see the EOS site at http://environmentalomics.org. >>>!!!<<< Ongoing NEBC activities, including the development of Bio-Linux, are being moved into the new EOS programme http://environmentalomics.org/portfolio/big-data-infrastructure/ . Once the current material from this website has been moved into EOS, this NEBC site will remain on-line as an archive. EnvBase is the searchable index to the data deposited through the NEBC, as well as related NERC experimental data. At present this is chiefly from the grants funded by the NERC Environmental Genomics Science Programme and the subsequent Post-genomics and Proteomics Science Programme, but more data from ongoing projects continues to be added