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Found 12 result(s)
----<<<<< This repository is no longer available. This record is out dated >>>>>----- The aim of FlyReactome, based in the Department of Genetics, University of Cambridge, is to develop a curated repository for Drosophila melanogaster pathways and reactions. The information in this database is authored by biological researchers with expertise in their fields, maintained by the FlyReactome staff.
METLIN represents the largest MS/MS collection of data with the database generated at multiple collision energies and in positive and negative ionization modes. The data is generated on multiple instrument types including SCIEX, Agilent, Bruker and Waters QTOF mass spectrometers.
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The JCB DataViewer is an image hosting and presentation platform for original image datasets associated with articles published in The Journal of Cell Biology, a peer-reviewed journal from the Rockefeller University Press.
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Since the first discovery of RNA pseudoknots more and many more pseudoknots have been found. However, not all of those pseudoknot data are easy to trace. Sometimes the information is hidden in a publication where the title gives no hint that pseudoknot information is there. This was the first reason that we thought that a general accessible information source for pseudoknots would be handy.
The Database of Protein Disorder (DisProt) is a curated database that provides information about proteins that lack fixed 3D structure in their putatively native states, either in their entirety or in part. DisProt is a community resource annotating protein sequences for intrinsically disorder regions from the literature. It classifies intrinsic disorder based on experimental methods and three ontologies for molecular function, transition and binding partner.
The Sol Genomics Network (SGN) is a clade-oriented database dedicated to the biology of the Solanaceae family which includes a large number of closely related and many agronomically important species such as tomato, potato, tobacco, eggplant, pepper, and the ornamental Petunia hybrida. SGN is part of the International Solanaceae Initiative (SOL), which has the long-term goal of creating a network of resources and information to address key questions in plant adaptation and diversification
EMAGE (e-Mouse Atlas of Gene Expression) is an online biological database of gene expression data in the developing mouse (Mus musculus) embryo. The data held in EMAGE is spatially annotated to a framework of 3D mouse embryo models produced by EMAP (e-Mouse Atlas Project). These spatial annotations allow users to query EMAGE by spatial pattern as well as by gene name, anatomy term or Gene Ontology (GO) term. EMAGE is a freely available web-based resource funded by the Medical Research Council (UK) and based at the MRC Human Genetics Unit in the Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Edinburgh, UK.
The CATH database is a hierarchical domain classification of protein structures in the Protein Data Bank. Protein structures are classified using a combination of automated and manual procedures. There are four major levels in the CATH hierarchy; Class, Architecture, Topology and Homologous superfamily.
Complete Genomics provides free public access to a variety of whole human genome data sets generated from Complete Genomics’ sequencing service. The research community can explore and familiarize themselves with the quality of these data sets, review the data formats provided from our sequencing service, and augment their own research with additional summaries of genomic variation across a panel of diverse individuals. The quality of these data sets is representative of what a customer can expect to receive for their own samples. This public genome repository comprises genome results from both our Standard Sequencing Service (69 standard, non-diseased samples) and the Cancer Sequencing Service (two matched tumor and normal sample pairs). In March 2013 Complete Genomics was acquired by BGI-Shenzhen , the world’s largest genomics services company. BGI is a company headquartered in Shenzhen, China that provides comprehensive sequencing and bioinformatics services for commercial science, medical, agricultural and environmental applications. Complete Genomics is now focused on building a new generation of high-throughput sequencing technology and developing new and exciting research, clinical and consumer applications.
DDBJ; DNA Data Bank of Japan is the sole nucleotide sequence data bank in Asia, which is officially certified to collect nucleotide sequences from researchers and to issue the internationally recognized accession number to data submitters.Since we exchange the collected data with EMBL-Bank/EBI; European Bioinformatics Institute and GenBank/NCBI; National Center for Biotechnology Information on a daily basis, the three data banks share virtually the same data at any given time. The virtually unified database is called "INSD; International Nucleotide Sequence Database DDBJ collects sequence data mainly from Japanese researchers, but of course accepts data and issue the accession number to researchers in any other countries.
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Helmholtz Repository of Bioparts (HeRBi) provides plasmids to the scientific community, delocalised within the different Helmholtz centers.