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Found 11 result(s)
The tree of life links all biodiversity through a shared evolutionary history. This project will produce the first online, comprehensive first-draft tree of all 1.8 million named species, accessible to both the public and scientific communities. Assembly of the tree will incorporate previously-published results, with strong collaborations between computational and empirical biologists to develop, test and improve methods of data synthesis. This initial tree of life will not be static; instead, we will develop tools for scientists to update and revise the tree as new data come in. Early release of the tree and tools will motivate data sharing and facilitate ongoing synthesis of knowledge.
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The Portal of Genomic Data is an initiative of the National System of Genomic Data (SNDG) of the Ministry of Science, Technology and Productive Innovation of Argentina whose purpose is to visualize, share, disseminate and return to society the primary data that are generated as a result of the investigations financed by the National State. The site allows access to the unified national database of genomic information for all species of ecological, agricultural, biotechnological and health interest; have information from the centers affiliated to the SNDG and their data sets and tools; know the main SNDG statistics; and visualize and / or download the available resources.
Country
GBIF is an international organisation that is working to make the world's biodiversity data accessible everywhere in the world. GBIF and its many partners work to mobilize the data, and to improve search mechanisms, data and metadata standards, web services, and the other components of an Internet-based information infrastructure for biodiversity. GBIF makes available data that are shared by hundreds of data publishers from around the world. These data are shared according to the GBIF Data Use Agreement, which includes the provision that users of any data accessed through or retrieved via the GBIF Portal will always give credit to the original data publishers.
>>>!!!<<< as stated 2017-06-09 MPIDB is no longer available under URL http://www.jcvi.org/mpidb/about.php >>>!!!<<< The microbial protein interaction database (MPIDB) aims to collect and provide all known physical microbial interactions. Currently, 24,295 experimentally determined interactions among proteins of 250 bacterial species/strains can be browsed and downloaded. These microbial interactions have been manually curated from the literature or imported from other databases (IntAct, DIP, BIND, MINT) and are linked to 26,578 experimental evidences (PubMed ID, PSI-MI methods). In contrast to these databases, interactions in MPIDB are further supported by 68,346 additional evidences based on interaction conservation, protein complex membership, and 3D domain contacts (iPfam, 3did). We do not include (spoke/matrix) binary interactions infered from pull-down experiments.
The NCMA maintains the largest and most diverse collection of publically available marine algal strains in the world. The algal strains in the collection have been obtained from all over the world, from polar to tropical waters, marine, freshwater, brackish, and hyper-saline environments. New strains (50 - 100 per year) are added largely through the accession of strains deposited by scientists in the community. A stringent accession policy is required to help populate the collection with a diverse range of strains.
BEI Resources was established by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) to provide reagents, tools and information for studying Category A, B, and C priority pathogens, emerging infectious disease agents, non-pathogenic microbes and other microbiological materials of relevance to the research community. BEI Resources acquires authenticates, and produces reagents that scientists need to carry out basic research and develop improved diagnostic tests, vaccines, and therapies. By centralizing these functions within BEI Resources, access to and use of these materials in the scientific community is monitored and quality control of the reagents is assured
Pathogen Portal is a repository linking to the Bioinformatics Resource Centers (BRCs) sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and maintained by The Virginia Bioinformatics Institute. The BRCs are providing web-based resources to scientific community conducting basic and applied research on organisms considered potential agents of biowarfare or bioterrorism or causing emerging or re-emerging diseases. The Pathogen Portal supports and links to five Bioinformatics Resource Centers (BRCs). Each BRC specializes in a different group of pathogens, focusing on, but not limited to, pathogens causing (Re-)Emerging Infectious Diseases, and those in the NIAID Category A-C Priority Pathogen lists for biodefense research. The scope of the BRCs also includes Invertebrate Vectors of Human Disease. Pathogen Portal covers EuPathDB, IRD, PATRIC, VectorBase and ViPR.
Country
The DSMZ is one of the largest biological ressource centers worldwide.Its collections currently comprise more than 50,000 items, including about 27,000 different bacterial and 4,000 fungal strains, 800 human and animal cell lines, 700 plant cell lines, 1,400 plant viruses and antisera, and 13,000 different types of bacterial genomic DNA.. All biological materials accepted in the DSMZ collection are subject to extensive quality control and physiological and molecular characterization by our central services. In addition, DSMZ provides an extensive documentation and detailed diagnostic information on the biological materials. The unprecedented diversity and quality management of its bioressources render the DSMZ an internationally reknown supplier for science, diagnostic laboratories, national reference centers, as well as industrial partners.
The PATRIC website provides an entry point to integrated data and tools for bacterial infectious disease research. The website is organized by data types and analysis tools. Primary access is provided through the PATRIC main menu, available at the top of the home page.
The NCBI Taxonomy database is a curated set of names and classifications for all of the organisms that are represented in GenBank. The EMBL and DDBJ databases, as well as GenBank, now use the NCBI Taxonomy as the standard classification for nucleotide sequences. Taxonomy Contains the names and phylogenetic lineages of more than 160,000 organisms that have molecular data in the NCBI databases. New taxa are added to the Taxonomy database as data are deposited for them. When new sequences are submitted to GenBank, the submission is checked for new organism names, which are then classified and added to the Taxonomy database.
The Antimicrobial Peptide Database (APD) was originally created by a graduate student, Zhe Wang, as his master's thesis in the laboratory of Dr. Guangshun Wang. The project was initiated in 2002 and the first version of the database was open to the public in August 2003. It contained 525 peptide entries, which can be searched in multiple ways, including APD ID, peptide name, amino acid sequence, original location, PDB ID, structure, methods for structural determination, peptide length, charge, hydrophobic content, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anticancer, and hemolytic activity. Some results of this bioinformatics tool were reported in the 2004 database paper. The peptide data stored in the APD were gleaned from the literature (PubMed, PDB, Google, and Swiss-Prot) manually in over a decade.