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Found 20 result(s)
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The Ningaloo Atlas was created in response to the need for more comprehensive and accessible information on environmental and socio-economic data on the greater Ningaloo region. As such, the Ningaloo Atlas is a web portal to not only access and share information, but to celebrate and promote the biodiversity, heritage, value, and way of life of the greater Ningaloo region.
The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) improves research capacity in the Earth and Ocean sciences by maintaining an open community digital data archive for rock magnetic, geomagnetic, archeomagnetic (archaeomagnetic) and paleomagnetic (palaeomagnetic) data. Different parts of the website allow users access to archive, search, visualize, and download these data. MagIC supports the international rock magnetism, geomagnetism, archeomagnetism (archaeomagnetism), and paleomagnetism (palaeomagnetism) research and endeavors to bring data out of private archives, making them accessible to all and (re-)useable for new, creative, collaborative scientific and educational activities. The data in MagIC is used for many types of studies including tectonic plate reconstructions, geomagnetic field models, paleomagnetic field reversal studies, magnetohydrodynamical studies of the Earth's core, magnetostratigraphy, and archeology. MagIC is a domain-specific data repository and directed by PIs who are both producers and consumers of rock, geo, and paleomagnetic data. Funded by NSF since 2003, MagIC forms a major part of https://earthref.org which integrates four independent cyber-initiatives rooted in various parts of the Earth, Ocean and Life sciences and education.
D-PLACE contains cultural, linguistic, environmental and geographic information for over 1400 human ‘societies’. A ‘society’ in D-PLACE represents a group of people in a particular locality, who often share a language and cultural identity. All cultural descriptions are tagged with the date to which they refer and with the ethnographic sources that provided the descriptions. The majority of the cultural descriptions in D-PLACE are based on ethnographic work carried out in the 19th and early-20th centuries (pre-1950).
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LIAG's Geophysics Information System (FIS GP) serves for the storage and supply of geophysical measurements and evaluations of LIAG and its partners. The architecture of the overall system intends a subdivision into an universal part (superstructure) and into several subsystems dedicated to geophysical methods (borehole geophysics, gravimetry, magnetics, 1D/2D geoelectrics, underground temperatures, seismics, VSP, helicopter geophysics and rock physics. The building of more subsystems is planned.
LinkedEarth is an EarthCube-funded project aiming to better organize and share Earth Science data, especially paleoclimate data. LinkedEarth facilitates the work of scientists by empowering them to curate their own data and to build new tools centered around those.
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Australian Ocean Data Network (AODN) provides data collected by the Australian marine community. AODN's data is searchable via map interface and metadata catalogue. AODN is Australia's exhaustive repository for marine and climate data. AODN has merged with IMOS eMarine Information Infrastructure (eMII) Facility in May 2016. IMOS is a multi-institutional collaboration with a focus on open data access. It is ideally placed to manage the AODN on behalf of the Australian marine and climate community.
The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Environmental Systems Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem (ESS-DIVE) is a new data archive for Earth and environmental science data. ESS-DIVE is funded by the Data Management program within the Climate and Environmental Science Division under the DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research program (BER), and is maintained by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. ESS-DIVE will archive and publicly share data obtained from observational, experimental, and modeling research that is funded by the DOE’s Office of Science under its Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) and Terrestrial Ecosystem Science (TES) programs within the Environmental Systems Science (ESS) activity. ESS-DIVE will include CDIAC that closed September 30, 2017. >>>!!!<<< March 2018: Some of the CDIAC data has not yet been transferred to ESS-DIVE. Click here http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/ to check the CDIAC transition website. >>>!!!<<< The new archive for the CDIAC data will be ESS-DIVE except in the specific cases mentioned below: The Oceanic Trace Gas data have been transitioned to the new Ocean Carbon Data System (OCADS) operated by NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) at https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/ocads/. The Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) data have been transitioned to Caltech (http://tccondata.org/). HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO) data are transitioning to the NCAR Earth Observing Laboratory (https://www.eol.ucar.edu/data-software). - ESS-DIVE launched in July 2017, and is currently in the process of implementing a new archive designed to provide long-term stewardship and use of data from observational, experimental and modeling activities in the DOE in the Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) and Terrestrial Ecosystem Science (TES) Programs in the Environmental System Science (ESS) activity.
OpenStreetMap (https://www.openstreetmap.org/export#map=6/51.324/10.426) is built by a community of mappers that contribute and maintain data about roads, trails, cafés, railway stations, and much more, all over the world. Planet.osm is the OpenStreetMap data in one file.
Under the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) the Working Group on Coupled Modelling (WGCM) established the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) as a standard experimental protocol for studying the output of coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs). CMIP provides a community-based infrastructure in support of climate model diagnosis, validation, intercomparison, documentation and data access. This framework enables a diverse community of scientists to analyze GCMs in a systematic fashion, a process which serves to facilitate model improvement. Virtually the entire international climate modeling community has participated in this project since its inception in 1995. The Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) archives much of the CMIP data and provides other support for CMIP. We are now beginning the process towards the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report and with it the CMIP5 intercomparison activity. The CMIP5 (CMIP Phase 5) experiment design has been finalized with the following suites of experiments: I Decadal Hindcasts and Predictions simulations, II "long-term" simulations, III "atmosphere-only" (prescribed SST) simulations for especially computationally-demanding models. The new ESGF peer-to-peer (P2P) enterprise system (http://pcmdi9.llnl.gov) is now the official site for CMIP5 model output. The old gateway (http://pcmdi3.llnl.gov) is deprecated and now shut down permanently.
The Arctic Data Center is the primary data and software repository for the Arctic section of NSF Polar Programs. The Center helps the research community to reproducibly preserve and discover all products of NSF-funded research in the Arctic, including data, metadata, software, documents, and provenance that links these together. The repository is open to contributions from NSF Arctic investigators, and data are released under an open license (CC-BY, CC0, depending on the choice of the contributor). All science, engineering, and education research supported by the NSF Arctic research program are included, such as Natural Sciences (Geoscience, Earth Science, Oceanography, Ecology, Atmospheric Science, Biology, etc.) and Social Sciences (Archeology, Anthropology, Social Science, etc.). Key to the initiative is the partnership between NCEAS at UC Santa Barbara, DataONE, and NOAA’s NCEI, each of which bring critical capabilities to the Center. Infrastructure from the successful NSF-sponsored DataONE federation of data repositories enables data replication to NCEI, providing both offsite and institutional diversity that are critical to long term preservation.
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The eAtlas is a website, mapping system and set of data visualisation tools for presenting research data in an accessible form that promotes greater use of this information. The eAtlas will serve as the primary data and knowledge repository for all NERP Tropical Ecosystems Hub projects, which focus on the on the Great Barrier Reef, Wet Tropics rainforest and Torres Strait. The eAtlas will capture and record research outcomes and make them available to research-users in a timely, readily accessible manner. It will host meta-data records and provide an enduring repository for raw data. It will also develop and host web visualisations to view information using a simple and intuitive interface. This will assist scientists with data discovery and allow environmental managers to access and investigate research data.
DLESE is the Digital Library for Earth System Education, a geoscience community resource that supports teaching and learning about the Earth system. It is funded by the National Science Foundation and is being built by a community of educators, students, and scientists to support Earth system education at all levels and in both formal and informal settings. Resources in DLESE include lesson plans, scientific data, visualizations, interactive computer models, and virtual field trips - in short, any web-accessible teaching or learning material. Many of these resources are organized in collections, or groups of related resources that reflect a coherent, focused theme. In many ways, digital collections are analogous to collections in traditional bricks-and-mortar libraries.
>>>>!!!!<<<< As of 2017-05-17 the data catalog is no longer available >>>>!!!!<<<< DataFed is a web services-based software that non-intrusively mediates between autonomous, distributed data providers and users. The main goals of DataFed are: Aid air quality management and science by effective use of relevant data - Facilitate the access and flow of atmospheric data from provider to users - Support the development of user-driven data processing value chains. DataFed Catalog links searchable Datafed applications worldwide.