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Found 46 result(s)
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Research Data Australia is the data discovery service of the Australian National Data Service (ANDS). We do not store the data itself here but provide descriptions of, and links to, the data from our data publishing partners. ANDS is funded by the Australian Government through the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy (NCRIS).
Jason is a remote-controlled deep-diving vessel that gives shipboard scientists immediate, real-time access to the sea floor. Instead of making short, expensive dives in a submarine, scientists can stay on deck and guide Jason as deep as 6,500 meters (4 miles) to explore for days on end. Jason is a type of remotely operated vehicle (ROV), a free-swimming vessel connected by a long fiberoptic tether to its research ship. The 10-km (6 mile) tether delivers power and instructions to Jason and fetches data from it.
CRAWDAD is the Community Resource for Archiving Wireless Data, a wireless network data resource for the research community. This archive has the capacity to store wireless trace data from many contributing locations, and staff to develop better tools for collecting, anonymizing, and analyzing the data. We work with community leaders to ensure that the archive meets the needs of the research community.
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The RESIF Seismic data portal offers access to seismological and other associated geophysical data from permanent and temporary seismic networks operated all over the world by French research institutions and international partners, to support research on source processes and imaging of the Earth's interior at all scales. RESIF (French seismologic and geodetic network) is a French national equipment for the observation and understanding of the solid Earth.
The IMEx consortium is an international collaboration between a group of major public interaction data providers who have agreed to share curation effort and develop and work to a single set of curation rules when capturing data from both directly deposited interaction data or from publications in peer-reviewed journals, capture full details of an interaction in a “deep” curation model, perform a complete curation of all protein-protein interactions experimentally demonstrated within a publication, make these interaction available in a single search interface on a common website, provide the data in standards compliant download formats, make all IMEx records freely accessible under the Creative Commons Attribution License
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Arquivo.pt is a research infrastructure that preserves millions of files collected from the web since 1996 and provides a public search service over this information. It contains information in several languages. Periodically it collects and stores information published on the web. Then, it processes the collect data to make it searchable, providing a “Google-like” service that enables searching the past web (English user interface available at www.archive.pt). This preservation workflow is performed through a large-scale distributed information system and can also accessed through API.
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China National GeneBank DataBase (CNGBdb) is a unified platform built for biological big data sharing and application services to the research community. Based on the big data and cloud computing technologies, it provides data services such as archive, analysis, knowledge search, management authorization, and visualization. At present, CNGBdb has integrated large amounts of internal and external molecular data and other information from CNGB, NCBI, EBI, DDBJ, etc., indexed by search, covering 12 data structures. Moreover, CNGBdb correlates living sources, biological samples and bioinformatic data to realize the traceability of comprehensive data.
NC OneMap is a public service providing comprehensive discovery and access to North Carolina's geospatial data resources. NC OneMap, the State's Clearinghouse for geospatial information, relies on data sharing and partnerships.
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The arctic data archive system (ADS) collects observation data and modeling products obtained by various Japanese research projects and gives researchers to access the results. By centrally managing a wide variety of Arctic observation data, we promote the use of data across multiple disciplines. Researchers use these integrated databases to clarify the mechanisms of environmental change in the atmosphere, ocean, land-surface and cryosphere. That ADS will be provide an opportunity of collaboration between modelers and field scientists, can be expected.
The WHOI Ship DataGrabber system provides the oceanographic community on-line access to underway ship data collected on the R/V Atlantis, Knorr, Oceanus, and Tioga (TBD). All the shipboard data is co-registered with the ship's GPS time and navigation systems.
The Rat Genome Database is a collaborative effort between leading research institutions involved in rat genetic and genomic research. Its goal, as stated in RFA: HL-99-013 is the establishment of a Rat Genome Database, to collect, consolidate, and integrate data generated from ongoing rat genetic and genomic research efforts and make these data widely available to the scientific community. A secondary, but critical goal is to provide curation of mapped positions for quantitative trait loci, known mutations and other phenotypic data.
The German Text Archive (Deutsches Textarchiv, DTA) presents online a selection of key German-language works in various disciplines from the 17th to 19th centuries. The electronic full-texts are indexed linguistically and the search facilities tolerate a range of spelling variants. The DTA presents German-language printed works from around 1650 to 1900 as full text and as digital facsimile. The selection of texts was made on the basis of lexicographical criteria and includes scientific or scholarly texts, texts from everyday life, and literary works. The digitalisation was made from the first edition of each work. Using the digital images of these editions, the text was first typed up manually twice (‘double keying’). To represent the structure of the text, the electronic full-text was encoded in conformity with the XML standard TEI P5. The next stages complete the linguistic analysis, i.e. the text is tokenised, lemmatised, and the parts of speech are annotated. The DTA thus presents a linguistically analysed, historical full-text corpus, available for a range of questions in corpus linguistics. Thanks to the interdisciplinary nature of the DTA Corpus, it also offers valuable source-texts for neighbouring disciplines in the humanities, and for scientists, legal scholars and economists.
Edinburgh DataShare is an online digital repository of multi-disciplinary research datasets produced at the University of Edinburgh, hosted by the Data Library in Information Services. Edinburgh University researchers who have produced research data associated with an existing or forthcoming publication, or which has potential use for other researchers, are invited to upload their dataset for sharing and safekeeping. A persistent identifier and suggested citation will be provided.
ISRIC - World Soil Information is an independent foundation. As regular member of the ICS World Data System it is also known as World Data Centre for Soils (WDC-Soils). ISRIC was founded in 1966 through the International Soil Science Society (ISSS) and United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). It has a mission to serve the international community with information about the world’s soil resources to help addressing major global issues. Our work is organised according to four work streams: 1) Setting standards and references, 2) Soil information provision (databases & soil mapping), 3) Capcaity building and advocacy, and 4) Generation of derived products.
CalSurv is a comprehensive information on West Nile virus, plague, malaria, Lyme disease, trench fever and other vectorborne diseases in California — where they are, where they’ve been, where they may be headed and what new diseases may be emerging.The CalSurv Web site serves as a portal or a single interface to all surveillance-related Web sites in California.
The NCBI Short Genetic Variations database, commonly known as dbSNP, catalogs short variations in nucleotide sequences from a wide range of organisms. These variations include single nucleotide variations, short nucleotide insertions and deletions, short tandem repeats and microsatellites. Short Genetic Variations may be common, thus representing true polymorphisms, or they may be rare. Some rare human entries have additional information associated withthem, including disease associations, genotype information and allele origin, as some variations are somatic rather than germline events. ***NCBI will phase out support for non-human organism data in dbSNP and dbVar beginning on September 1, 2017***
The GSA Data Repository is an open file in which authors of articles in our journals can place information that supplements and expands on their article. These supplements will not appear in print but may be obtained from GSA.
The Argo observational network consists of a fleet of 3000+ profiling autonomous floats deployed by about a dozen teams worldwide. WHOI has built about 10% of the global fleet. The mission lifetime of each float is about 4 years. During a typical mission, each float reports a profile of the upper ocean every 10 days. The sensors onboard record fundamental physical properties of the ocean: temperature and conductivity (a measure of salinity) as a function of pressure. The depth range of the observed profile depends on the local stratification and the float's mechanical ability to adjust it's buoyancy. The majority of Argo floats report profiles between 1-2 km depth. At each surfacing, measurements of temperature and salinity are relayed back to shore via satellite. Telemetry is usually received every 10 days, but floats at high-latitudes which are iced-over accumulate their data and transmit the entire record the next time satellite contact is established. With current battery technology, the best performing floats last 6+ years and record over 200 profiles.
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ConsensusPathDB integrates interaction networks in humans (and in the model organisms - yeast and mouse) including binary and complex protein-protein, genetic, metabolic, signaling, gene regulatory and drug-target interactions, as well as biochemical pathways. Data originate from public resources for interactions and interactions curated from the literature. The interaction data are integrated in a complementary manner to avoid redundancies.
BioModels is a repository of mathematical models of biological and biomedical systems. It hosts a vast selection of existing literature-based physiologically and pharmaceutically relevant mechanistic models in standard formats. Our mission is to provide the systems modelling community with reproducible, high-quality, freely-accessible models published in the scientific literature.
The European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) captures and presents information relating to experimental workflows that are based around nucleotide sequencing. A typical workflow includes the isolation and preparation of material for sequencing, a run of a sequencing machine in which sequencing data are produced and a subsequent bioinformatic analysis pipeline. ENA records this information in a data model that covers input information (sample, experimental setup, machine configuration), output machine data (sequence traces, reads and quality scores) and interpreted information (assembly, mapping, functional annotation). Data arrive at ENA from a variety of sources. These include submissions of raw data, assembled sequences and annotation from small-scale sequencing efforts, data provision from the major European sequencing centres and routine and comprehensive exchange with our partners in the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC). Provision of nucleotide sequence data to ENA or its INSDC partners has become a central and mandatory step in the dissemination of research findings to the scientific community. ENA works with publishers of scientific literature and funding bodies to ensure compliance with these principles and to provide optimal submission systems and data access tools that work seamlessly with the published literature.
Earthdata powered by EOSDIS (Earth Observing System Data and Information System) is a key core capability in NASA’s Earth Science Data Systems Program. It provides end-to-end capabilities for managing NASA’s Earth science data from various sources – satellites, aircraft, field measurements, and various other programs. EOSDIS uses the metadata and service discovery tool Earthdata Search https://search.earthdata.nasa.gov/. The capabilities of EOSDIS constituting the EOSDIS Science Operations are managed by NASA's Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) Project. The capabilities include: generation of higher level (Level 1-4) science data products for several satellite missions; archiving and distribution of data products from Earth observation satellite missions, as well as aircraft and field measurement campaigns. The EOSDIS science operations are performed within a distributed system of many interconnected nodes - Science Investigator-led Processing Systems (SIPS), and distributed, discipline-specific, Earth science Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) with specific responsibilities for production, archiving, and distribution of Earth science data products. The DAACs serve a large and diverse user community by providing capabilities to search and access science data products and specialized services.
Biological collections are replete with taxonomic, geographic, temporal, numerical, and historical information. This information is crucial for understanding and properly managing biodiversity and ecosystems, but is often difficult to access. Canadensys, operated from the Université de Montréal Biodiversity Centre, is a Canada-wide effort to unlock the biodiversity information held in biological collections.
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CEEHRC represents a multi-stage funding commitment by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and multiple Canadian and international partners. The overall aim is to position Canada at the forefront of international efforts to translate new discoveries in the field of epigenetics into improved human health. The two sites will focus on sequencing human reference epigenomes and developing new technologies and protocols; they will also serve as platforms for other CEEHRC funding initiatives, such as catalyst and team grants. The complementary reference epigenome mapping efforts of the two sites will focus on a range of common human diseases. The Vancouver group will focus on the role of epigenetics in the development of cancer, including lymphoma and cancers of the ovary, colon, breast, and thyroid. The Montreal team will focus on autoimmune / inflammatory, cardio-metabolic, and neuropsychiatric diseases, using studies of identical twins as well as animal models of human disease.