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Found 10 result(s)
The Global Hydrology Resource Center (GHRC) provides both historical and current Earth science data, information, and products from satellite, airborne, and surface-based instruments. GHRC acquires basic data streams and produces derived products from many instruments spread across a variety of instrument platforms.
4TU.ResearchData, previously known as 3TU.Datacentrum, is an archive for research data. It offers the knowledge, experience and the tools to share and safely store scientific research data in a standardized, secure and well-documented manner. 4TU.Centre for Research Data provides the research community with: Advice and support on data management; A long-term archive for scientific research data; Support for current research projects; Tools for reusing research data.
Country
At 2016-05-29 sees the official merger of the IMOS eMarine Information Infrastructure (eMII) Facility and the Australian Ocean Data Network (AODN) into a single entity. The marine information Facility of IMOS is now the AODN. Enabling open access to marine data is core business for IMOS. The IMOS data will continue to be discoverable alongside a wider collection of Australian marine and climate data via the new-look AODN Portal. Visit the AODN Portal at https://portal.aodn.org.au/. - IMOS is designed to be a fully-integrated, national system, observing at ocean-basin and regional scales, and covering physical, chemical and biological variables. IMOS observations are guided by science planning undertaken collaboratively across the Nodes of the Australian marine and climate science community with input from government, industry and other stakeholders. There are five major research themes that unify IMOS science plans and related observations: Long-term ocean change, Climate variability and weather extremes, Boundary currents, Continental shelf and coastal processes, and Ecosystem responses. The observations and data streams are collected via ten technology platforms, or Facilities.
U.S. IOOS is a vital tool for tracking, predicting, managing, and adapting to changes in our ocean, coastal and Great Lakes environment. A primary focus of U.S. IOOS is integration of, and expedited access to, ocean observation data for improved decision making. The Data Management and Communication (DMAC) subsystem of U.S. IOOS serves as a central mechanism for integrating all existing and projected data sources.
Country
Australian Ocean Data Network (AODN) provides data collected by the Australian marine community. AODN's data is searchable via map interface and metadata catalogue. AODN is Australia's exhaustive repository for marine and climate data. AODN has merged with IMOS eMarine Information Infrastructure (eMII) Facility in May 2016. IMOS is a multi-institutional collaboration with a focus on open data access. It is ideally placed to manage the AODN on behalf of the Australian marine and climate community.
The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an international network of satellites that provide the next-generation global observations of rain and snow. Building upon the success of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), the GPM concept centers on the deployment of a “Core” satellite carrying an advanced radar / radiometer system to measure precipitation from space and serve as a reference standard to unify precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational satellites.
Climate Data Online (CDO) provides free access to NCDC's archive of global historical weather and climate data in addition to station history information. These data include quality controlled daily, monthly, seasonal, and yearly measurements of temperature, precipitation, wind, and degree days as well as radar data and 30-year Climate Normals
International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI) research focuses on climate, environmental monitoring, agriculture, health, water, and economic sectors in Africa, Asia and Pacific, and Latin America and Caribbean. The IRI data library is a freely accessible data repository and analysis tool. IRI allows users to view, manipulate, and download climate-related data sets through a standard web browser.
The Coastal Data Information Program (CDIP) is an extensive network for monitoring waves and beaches along the coastlines of the United States. Since its inception in 1975, the program has produced a vast database of publicly-accessible environmental data for use by coastal engineers and planners, scientists, mariners, and marine enthusiasts. The program has also remained at the forefront of coastal monitoring, developing numerous innovations in instrumentation, system control and management, computer hardware and software, field equipment, and installation techniques.
HydroShare is a system operated by The Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science Inc. (CUAHSI) that enables users to share and publish data and models in a variety of flexible formats, and to make this information available in a citable, shareable and discoverable manner. HydroShare includes a repository for data and models, and tools (web apps) that can act on content in HydroShare providing users with a gateway to high performance computing and computing in the cloud. With HydroShare you can: share data and models with colleagues; manage access to shared content; share, access, visualize, and manipulate a broad set of hydrologic data types and models; publish data and models and obtain a citable digital object identifier (DOI); aggregate resources into collections; discover and access data and models published by others; use the web services application programming interface (API) to programmatically access resources; and use integrated web applications to visualize, analyze and run models with data in HydroShare.