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Found 8 result(s)
The Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC) is a comprehensive clearinghouse of information about advanced transportation technologies. The AFDC offers transportation decision makers unbiased information, data, and tools related to the deployment of alternative fuels and advanced vehicles. The AFDC launched in 1991 in response to the Alternative Motor Fuels Act of 1988 and the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. It originally served as a repository for alternative fuel performance data. The AFDC has since evolved to offer a broad array of information resources that support efforts to reduce petroleum use in transportation. The AFDC serves Clean Cities stakeholders, fleets regulated by the Energy Policy Act, businesses, policymakers, government agencies, and the general public.
The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) improves research capacity in the Earth and Ocean sciences by maintaining an open community digital data archive for rock magnetic, geomagnetic, archeomagnetic (archaeomagnetic) and paleomagnetic (palaeomagnetic) data. Different parts of the website allow users access to archive, search, visualize, and download these data. MagIC supports the international rock magnetism, geomagnetism, archeomagnetism (archaeomagnetism), and paleomagnetism (palaeomagnetism) research and endeavors to bring data out of private archives, making them accessible to all and (re-)useable for new, creative, collaborative scientific and educational activities. The data in MagIC is used for many types of studies including tectonic plate reconstructions, geomagnetic field models, paleomagnetic field reversal studies, magnetohydrodynamical studies of the Earth's core, magnetostratigraphy, and archeology. MagIC is a domain-specific data repository and directed by PIs who are both producers and consumers of rock, geo, and paleomagnetic data. Funded by NSF since 2003, MagIC forms a major part of https://earthref.org which integrates four independent cyber-initiatives rooted in various parts of the Earth, Ocean and Life sciences and education.
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OGSEarth provides geoscience data, collected by the Mines and Minerals division, which can be viewed using user-friendly geographic information programs such as Google Earth™. OSGEarth provides data on Mining claims, Geology, Index maps, Administrative boundaries and Abandoned mines.
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The portal provides an understanding of energy resources and related data to establish an understanding of the sector in terms of developmental activities and best practices are being carried out in India in the energy sector. Thus it is sharing information on various aspects of energy in a comprehensive manner to a variety of stakeholders to enable effective consolidation and assimilation of knowledge. IEP provides access to energy statistics, case studies, national policies, sectoral overviews.
The British Geological Survey (BGS), the world’s oldest national geological survey, has over 400 datasets including environmental monitoring data, digital databases, physical collections (borehole core, rocks, minerals and fossils), records and archives.
The Met Office is the UK's National Weather Service. We have a long history of weather forecasting and have been working in the area of climate change for more than two decades. As a world leader in providing weather and climate services, we employ more than 1,800 at 60 locations throughout the world. We are recognised as one of the world's most accurate forecasters, using more than 10 million weather observations a day, an advanced atmospheric model and a high performance supercomputer to create 3,000 tailored forecasts and briefings a day. These are delivered to a huge range of customers from the Government, to businesses, the general public, armed forces, and other organisations.
DLESE is the Digital Library for Earth System Education, a geoscience community resource that supports teaching and learning about the Earth system. It is funded by the National Science Foundation and is being built by a community of educators, students, and scientists to support Earth system education at all levels and in both formal and informal settings. Resources in DLESE include lesson plans, scientific data, visualizations, interactive computer models, and virtual field trips - in short, any web-accessible teaching or learning material. Many of these resources are organized in collections, or groups of related resources that reflect a coherent, focused theme. In many ways, digital collections are analogous to collections in traditional bricks-and-mortar libraries.
Including data and software from CrystalEye is this a open-access collection of crystal structures of organic, inorganic, metal-organic compounds and minerals, excluding biopolymers. At present, this is the most comprehensive open resource for small molecule structures, freely available to all scientists in Lithuania and worldwide. Including data and software from CrystalEye, developed by Nick Day at the department of Chemistry, the University of Cambridge under supervision of Peter Murray-Rust.