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Found 54 result(s)
Exposome-Explorer is the first database dedicated to biomarkers of exposure to environmental risk factors for diseases. It contains detailed information on the nature of biomarkers, populations and subjects where measured, samples analyzed, methods used for biomarker analyses, concentrations in biospecimens, correlations with external exposure measurements, and biological reproducibility over time.
>>>!!!<<< SMD has been retired. After approximately fifteen years of microarray-centric research service, the Stanford Microarray Database has been retired. We apologize for any inconvenience; please read below for possible resolutions to your queries. If you are looking for any raw data that was directly linked to SMD from a manuscript, please search one of the public repositories. NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus EBI ArrayExpress All published data were previously communicated to one (or both) of the public repositories. Alternatively, data for publications between 1997 and 2004 were likely migrated to the Princeton University MicroArray Database, and are accessible there. If you are looking for a manuscript supplement (i.e. from a domain other than smd.stanford.edu), perhaps try searching the Internet Archive: Wayback Machine https://archive.org/web/ . >>>!!!<<< The Stanford Microarray Database (SMD) is a DNA microarray research database that provides a large amount of data for public use.
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Indian Genetic Disease Database (IGDD) is an initiative of CSIR Indian Institute of Chemical Biology. It is supported by Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) and Department of Biotechnology (DBT) of India. The Indian people represent one-sixth of the world population and consists of a ethnically, geographically, and genetically diverse population. In some communities the ratio of genetic disorder is relatively high due to consanguineous marriage practiced in the community. This database has been created to keep track of mutations in the causal genes for genetic diseases common in India and help the physicians, geneticists, and other professionals retrieve and use the information for the benefit of the public. The database includes scientific information about these genetic diseases and disabilities, but also statistical information about these diseases in today's society. Data is categorized by body part affected and then by title of the disease.
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NONCODE is an integrated knowledge database dedicated to non-coding RNAs (excluding tRNAs and rRNAs). Now, there are 16 species in NONCODE(human, mouse, cow, rat, chicken, fruitfly, zebrafish, celegans, yeast, Arabidopsis, chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, rhesus macaque, opossum and platypus).The source of NONCODE includes literature and other public databases. We searched PubMed using key words ‘ncrna’, ‘noncoding’, ‘non-coding’,‘no code’, ‘non-code’, ‘lncrna’ or ‘lincrna. We retrieved the new identified lncRNAs and their annotation from the Supplementary Material or web site of these articles. Together with the newest data from Ensembl , RefSeq, lncRNAdb and GENCODE were processed through a standard pipeline for each species.
Neotoma is a multiproxy paleoecological database that covers the Pliocene-Quaternary, including modern microfossil samples. The database is an international collaborative effort among individuals from 19 institutions, representing multiple constituent databases. There are over 20 data-types within the Neotoma Paleoecological Database, including pollen microfossils, plant macrofossils, vertebrate fauna, diatoms, charcoal, biomarkers, ostracodes, physical sedimentology and water chemistry. Neotoma provides an underlying cyberinfrastructure that enables the development of common software tools for data ingest, discovery, display, analysis, and distribution, while giving domain scientists control over critical taxonomic and other data quality issues.
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The Ningaloo Atlas was created in response to the need for more comprehensive and accessible information on environmental and socio-economic data on the greater Ningaloo region. As such, the Ningaloo Atlas is a web portal to not only access and share information, but to celebrate and promote the biodiversity, heritage, value, and way of life of the greater Ningaloo region.
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The Organelle Genome Megasequencing Program (OGMP) provides mitochondrial, chloroplast, and mitochondrial plasmid genome data. OGMP tools allow direct comparison of OGMP and NCBI validated records. Includes GOBASE, a taxonomically broad organelle genome database that organizes and integrates diverse data related to mitochondria and chloroplasts.
The PAIN Repository is a recently funded NIH initiative, which has two components: an archive for already collected imaging data (Archived Repository), and a repository for structural and functional brain images and metadata acquired prospectively using standardized acquisition parameters (Standardized Repository) in healthy control subjects and patients with different types of chronic pain. The PAIN Repository provides the infrastructure for storage of standardized resting state functional, diffusion tensor imaging and structural brain imaging data and associated biological, physiological and behavioral metadata from multiple scanning sites, and provides tools to facilitate analysis of the resulting comprehensive data sets.
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DataverseNO is an archive platform for open research data, owned and operated by UiT The Arctic University of Norway. DataverseNO is open for researchers and organizations associated with Norwegian universities and research institutions, as well as independent researchers from Norway. All kind of open research data from all academic disciplines may be archived.
Open access repository for digital research created at the University of Minnesota. U of M researchers may deposit data to the Libraries’ Data Repository for U of M (DRUM), subject to our collection policies. All data is publicly accessible. Data sets submitted to the Data Repository are reviewed by data curation staff to ensure that data is in a format and structure that best facilitates long-term access, discovery, and reuse.
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The DrugBank database is a unique bioinformatics and cheminformatics resource that combines detailed drug (i.e. chemical, pharmacological and pharmaceutical) data with comprehensive drug target (i.e. sequence, structure, and pathway) information. The latest release of DrugBank (version 5.1.1, released 2018-07-03) contains 11,881 drug entries including 2,526 approved small molecule drugs, 1,184 approved biotech (protein/peptide) drugs, 129 nutraceuticals and over 5,751 experimental drugs. Additionally, 5,132 non-redundant protein (i.e. drug target/enzyme/transporter/carrier) sequences are linked to these drug entries. Each DrugCard entry contains more than 200 data fields with half of the information being devoted to drug/chemical data and the other half devoted to drug target or protein data.
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Oral Cancer Gene Database is an initiative of the Advanced Centre for Treatment, Research and Education in Cancer, Navi Mumbai. The present database, version II, consists of 374 genes. It is developed as a user friendly site that would provide the scientist, information and external links from one place. The database is accessed through a list of all genes, and Keyword Search using gene name or gene symbol, chromosomal location, CGH (in %), and molecular weight. Interaction Network shows the interaction between genes for particular biological processes and molecular functions.
TriTrypDB is an integrated genomic and functional genomic database for pathogens of the family Trypanosomatidae, including organisms in both Leishmania and Trypanosoma genera. TriTrypDB and its continued development are possible through the collaborative efforts between EuPathDB, GeneDB and colleagues at the Seattle Biomedical Research Institute (SBRI).
ScholarsArchive@OSU is Oregon State University's digital service for gathering, indexing, making available and storing the scholarly work of the Oregon State University community. It also includes materials from outside the institution in support of the university's land, sun, sea and space grant missions and other research interests.
As one of the cornerstones of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Geospatial Program, The National Map is a collaborative effort among the USGS and other Federal, State, and local partners to improve and deliver topographic information for the Nation. It has many uses ranging from recreation to scientific analysis to emergency response. The National Map is easily accessible for display on the Web, as products and services, and as downloadable data. The geographic information available from The National Map includes orthoimagery (aerial photographs), elevation, geographic names, hydrography, boundaries, transportation, structures, and land cover. Other types of geographic information can be added within the viewer or brought in with The National Map data into a Geographic Information System to create specific types of maps or map views.
EnsemblPlants is a genome-centric portal for plant species. Ensembl Plants is developed in coordination with other plant genomics and bioinformatics groups via the EBI's role in the transPLANT consortium.
VertNet is a NSF-funded collaborative project that makes biodiversity data free and available on the web. VertNet is a tool designed to help people discover, capture, and publish biodiversity data. It is also the core of a collaboration between hundreds of biocollections that contribute biodiversity data and work together to improve it. VertNet is an engine for training current and future professionals to use and build upon best practices in data quality, curation, research, and data publishing. Yet, VertNet is still the aggregate of all of the information that it mobilizes. To us, VertNet is all of these things and more.
The Database contains all publicly available HMS LINCS datasets and information for each dataset about experimental reagents (small molecule perturbagens, cells, antibodies, and proteins) and experimental and data analysis protocols.
!! OFFLINE !! A recent computer security audit has revealed security flaws in the legacy HapMap site that require NCBI to take it down immediately. We regret the inconvenience, but we are required to do this. That said, NCBI was planning to decommission this site in the near future anyway (although not quite so suddenly), as the 1,000 genomes (1KG) project has established itself as a research standard for population genetics and genomics. NCBI has observed a decline in usage of the HapMap dataset and website with its available resources over the past five years and it has come to the end of its useful life. The International HapMap Project is a multi-country effort to identify and catalog genetic similarities and differences in human beings. Using the information in the HapMap, researchers will be able to find genes that affect health, disease, and individual responses to medications and environmental factors. The Project is a collaboration among scientists and funding agencies from Japan, the United Kingdom, Canada, China, Nigeria, and the United States. All of the information generated by the Project will be released into the public domain. The goal of the International HapMap Project is to compare the genetic sequences of different individuals to identify chromosomal regions where genetic variants are shared. By making this information freely available, the Project will help biomedical researchers find genes involved in disease and responses to therapeutic drugs. In the initial phase of the Project, genetic data are being gathered from four populations with African, Asian, and European ancestry. Ongoing interactions with members of these populations are addressing potential ethical issues and providing valuable experience in conducting research with identified populations. Public and private organizations in six countries are participating in the International HapMap Project. Data generated by the Project can be downloaded with minimal constraints. The Project officially started with a meeting in October 2002 (https://www.genome.gov/10005336/) and is expected to take about three years.
The UniPROBE (Universal PBM Resource for Oligonucleotide Binding Evaluation) database hosts data generated by universal protein binding microarray (PBM) technology on the in vitro DNA binding specificities of proteins. This initial release of the UniPROBE database provides a centralized resource for accessing comprehensive data on the preferences of proteins for all possible sequence variants ('words') of length k ('k-mers'), as well as position weight matrix (PWM) and graphical sequence logo representations of the k-mer data. In total, the database currently hosts DNA binding data for 406 nonredundant proteins from a diverse collection of organisms, including the prokaryote Vibrio harveyi, the eukaryotic malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum, the parasitic Apicomplexan Cryptosporidium parvum, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the worm Caenorhabditis elegans, mouse, and human. The database's web tools (on the right) include a text-based search, a function for assessing motif similarity between user-entered data and database PWMs, and a function for locating putative binding sites along user-entered nucleotide sequences
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Ocean Networks Canada maintains several observatories installed in three different regions in the world's oceans. All three observatories are cabled systems that can provide power and high bandwidth communiction paths to sensors in the ocean. The infrastructure supports near real-time observations from multiple instruments and locations distributed across the Arctic, NEPTUNE and VENUS observatory networks. These observatories collect data on physical, chemical, biological, and geological aspects of the ocean over long time periods, supporting research on complex Earth processes in ways not previously possible.