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Found 21 result(s)
The Expression Atlas provides information on gene expression patterns under different biological conditions such as a gene knock out, a plant treated with a compound, or in a particular organism part or cell. It includes both microarray and RNA-seq data. The data is re-analysed in-house to detect interesting expression patterns under the conditions of the original experiment. There are two components to the Expression Atlas, the Baseline Atlas and the Differential Atlas. The Baseline Atlas displays information about which gene products are present (and at what abundance) in "normal" conditions (e.g. tissue, cell type). It aims to answer questions such as "which genes are specifically expressed in human kidney?". This component of the Expression Atlas consists of highly-curated and quality-checked RNA-seq experiments from ArrayExpress. It has data for many different animal and plant species. New experiments are added as they become available. The Differential Atlas allows users to identify genes that are up- or down-regulated in a wide variety of different experimental conditions such as yeast mutants, cadmium treated plants, cystic fibrosis or the effect on gene expression of mind-body practice. Both microarray and RNA-seq experiments are included in the Differential Atlas. Experiments are selected from ArrayExpress and groups of samples are manually identified for comparison e.g. those with wild type genotype compared to those with a gene knock out. Each experiment is processed through our in-house differential expression statistical analysis pipeline to identify genes with a high probability of differential expression.
The ENCODE Encyclopedia organizes the most salient analysis products into annotations, and provides tools to search and visualize them. The Encyclopedia has two levels of annotations: Integrative-level annotations integrate multiple types of experimental data and ground level annotations. Ground-level annotations are derived directly from the experimental data, typically produced by uniform processing pipelines.
IntAct provides a freely available, open source database system and analysis tools for molecular interaction data. All interactions are derived from literature curation or direct user submissions and are freely available.
The DIP database catalogs experimentally determined interactions between proteins. It combines information from a variety of sources to create a single, consistent set of protein-protein interactions. The data stored within the DIP database were curated, both, manually by expert curators and also automatically using computational approaches that utilize the the knowledge about the protein-protein interaction networks extracted from the most reliable, core subset of the DIP data. Please, check the reference page to find articles describing the DIP database in greater detail. The Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners (DLRP) is a subset of DIP (Database of Interacting Proteins). The DLRP is a database of protein ligand and protein receptor pairs that are known to interact with each other. By interact we mean that the ligand and receptor are members of a ligand-receptor complex and, unless otherwise noted, transduce a signal. In some instances the ligand and/or receptor may form a heterocomplex with other ligands/receptors in order to be functional. We have entered the majority of interactions in DLRP as full DIP entries, with links to references and additional information
The MG-RAST server is an open source system for annotation and comparative analysis of metagenomes. Users can upload raw sequence data in fasta format; the sequences will be normalized and processed and summaries automatically generated. The server provides several methods to access the different data types, including phylogenetic and metabolic reconstructions, and the ability to compare the metabolism and annotations of one or more metagenomes and genomes. In addition, the server offers a comprehensive search capability. Access to the data is password protected, and all data generated by the automated pipeline is available for download in a variety of common formats. MG-RAST has become an unofficial repository for metagenomic data, providing a means to make your data public so that it is available for download and viewing of the analysis without registration, as well as a static link that you can use in publications. It also requires that you include experimental metadata about your sample when it is made public to increase the usefulness to the community.
Greengenes is an Earth Sciences website that assists clinical and environmental microbiologists from around the globe in classifying microorganisms from their local environments. A 16S rRNA gene database addresses limitations of public repositories by providing chimera screening, standard alignment, and taxonomic classification using multiple published taxonomies.
VectorBase provides data on arthropod vectors of human pathogens. Sequence data, gene expression data, images, population data, and insecticide resistance data for arthropod vectors are available for download. VectorBase also offers genome browser, gene expression and microarray repository, and BLAST searches for all VectorBase genomes. VectorBase Genomes include Aedes aegypti, Anopheles gambiae, Culex quinquefasciatus, Ixodes scapularis, Pediculus humanus, Rhodnius prolixus. VectorBase is one the Bioinformatics Resource Centers (BRC) projects which is funded by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NAID).
The IPD-IMGT/HLA Database provides a specialist database for sequences of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and includes the official sequences named by the WHO Nomenclature Committee For Factors of the HLA System. The IPD-IMGT/HLA Database is part of the international ImMunoGeneTics project (IMGT). The database uses the 2010 naming convention for HLA alleles in all tools herein. To aid in the adoption of the new nomenclature, all search tools can be used with both the current and pre-2010 allele designations. The pre-2010 nomenclature designations are only used where older reports or outputs have been made available for download.
The Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC) is a coalition of investigators seeking to aggregate and harmonize exome sequencing data from a wide variety of large-scale sequencing projects, and to make summary data available for the wider scientific community. The data set provided on this website spans 60,706 unrelated individuals sequenced as part of various disease-specific and population genetic studies.
This site provides access to complete, annotated genomes from bacteria and archaea (present in the European Nucleotide Archive) through the Ensembl graphical user interface (genome browser). Ensembl Bacteria contains genomes from annotated INSDC records that are loaded into Ensembl multi-species databases, using the INSDC annotation import pipeline.
The Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB) is a public repository for electron microscopy density maps of macromolecular complexes and subcellular structures. It covers a variety of techniques, including single-particle analysis, electron tomography, and electron (2D) crystallography.
Established by the HLA Informatics Group of the Anthony Nolan Research Institute, IPD provides a centralized system for studying the immune system's polymorphism in genes. The IPD maintains databases concerning the sequences of human Killer-cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors (KIR), sequences of the major histocompatibility complex in a number of species, human platelet antigens (HPA), and tumor cell lines. Each subject has related, credible news, current research and publications, and a searchable database for highly specific, research grade genetic information.
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FANTOM stands for 'Functional Annotation of the Mammalian Genome' and is the name of an international research consortium organized by the RIKEN Omics Science Center. The FANTOM5 project aims to build a full understanding of transcriptional regulation in a human system by generating transcriptional regulatory networks that define every human cell type.
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ALEXA is a microarray design platform for 'alternative expression analysis'. This platform facilitates the design of expression arrays for analysis of mRNA isoforms generated from a single locus by the use of alternative transcription initiation, splicing and polyadenylation sites. We use the term 'ALEXA' to describe a collection of novel genomic methods for 'alternative expression' analysis. 'Alternative expression' refers to the identification and quantification of alternative mRNA transcripts produced by alternative transcript initiation, alternative splicing and alternative polyadenylation. This website provides supplementary materials, source code and other downloads for recent publications describing our studies of alternative expression (AE). Most recently we have developed a method, 'ALEXA-Seq' and associated resources for alternative expression analysis by massively parallel RNA sequencing.
The PATRIC website provides an entry point to integrated data and tools for bacterial infectious disease research. The website is organized by data types and analysis tools. Primary access is provided through the PATRIC main menu, available at the top of the home page.
The Ensembl genome annotation system, developed jointly by the EBI and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, has been used for the annotation, analysis and display of vertebrate genomes since 2000. Since 2009, the Ensembl site has been complemented by the creation of five new sites, for bacteria, protists, fungi, plants and invertebrate metazoa, enabling users to use a single collection of (interactive and programatic) interfaces for accessing and comparing genome-scale data from species of scientific interest from across the taxonomy. In each domain, we aim to bring the integrative power of Ensembl tools for comparative analysis, data mining and visualisation across genomes of scientific interest, working in collaboration with scientific communities to improve and deepen genome annotation and interpretation.