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Found 3 result(s)
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More than 25 years ago FIZ Karlsruhe started depositing crystal structure data linked to publications in German journals. At that time it was irrelevant whether the deposited structures were organic or inorganic. Today FIZ Karlsruhe is responsible for storing the structure data of inorganic compounds. Organic structure data are stored by the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Center. Nowadays many publishers inform their authors that in parallel to a publication in a scientific journal, crystal structure data should also be stored in the Crystal Structure Depot at FIZ Karlsruhe. A CSD number will be assigned to the data for later reference in the publication. The data can then be ordered from the Crystal Structure Depot at FIZ Karlsruhe.
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The WURM project is a database of computed Raman and infrared spectra and other physical properties for minerals. The calculations are performed within the framework of the density-functional theory and the density-functional perturbation theory. The database is freely available for teaching and research purposes and is presented in a web-based format, hosted on the http://www.wurm.info web site. It provides the crystal structure, the parameters of the calculations, the dielectric properties, the Raman spectra with both peak positions and intensities and the infrared spectra with peak positions for minerals. It shows the atomic displacement patterns for all the zone-center vibrational modes and the associated Raman tensors. The web presentation is user friendly and highly oriented toward the end user, with a strong educational component in mind. A set of visualization tools ensures the observation of the crystal structure, the vibrational pattern, and the different spectra. Further developments include elastic and optical properties of minerals.
Including data and software from CrystalEye is this a open-access collection of crystal structures of organic, inorganic, metal-organic compounds and minerals, excluding biopolymers. At present, this is the most comprehensive open resource for small molecule structures, freely available to all scientists in Lithuania and worldwide. Including data and software from CrystalEye, developed by Nick Day at the department of Chemistry, the University of Cambridge under supervision of Peter Murray-Rust.