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Found 160 result(s)
The 1000 Genomes Project is an international collaboration to produce an extensive public catalog of human genetic variation, including SNPs and structural variants, and their haplotype contexts. This resource will support genome-wide association studies and other medical research studies. The genomes of about 2500 unidentified people from about 25 populations around the world will be sequenced using next-generation sequencing technologies. The results of the study will be freely and publicly accessible to researchers worldwide. The International Genome Sample Resource (IGSR) has been established at EMBL-EBI to continue supporting data generated by the 1000 Genomes Project, supplemented with new data and new analysis.
4TU.ResearchData, previously known as 3TU.Datacentrum, is an archive for research data. It offers the knowledge, experience and the tools to share and safely store scientific research data in a standardized, secure and well-documented manner. 4TU.Centre for Research Data provides the research community with: Advice and support on data management; A long-term archive for scientific research data; Support for current research projects; Tools for reusing research data.
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TERN's AEKOS data portal is the original gateway to Australian ecology data. It is a ‘data and research methods’ data portal for Australia’s land-dwelling plants, animals and their environments. The primary focus of data content is raw co-located ‘species and environment’ ecological survey data that has been collected at the ‘plot’ level to describe biodiversity, its patterns and ecological processes. It is openly accessible with standard discovery metadata and user-oriented, contextual metadata critical for data reuse. Our services support the ecosystem science community, land managers and governments seeking to publish under COPE publishing ethics and the FAIR data publishing principles. AEKOS is registered with Thomson & Reuters Data Citation Index and is a recommended repository of Nature Publishing’s Scientific Data. There are currently 97,037 sites covering mostly plant biodiversity and co-located environmental data of Australia. The AEKOS initiative is supported by TERN (tern.org.au), hosted by The University of Adelaide and funded by the Australian Government’s National Research Infrastructure for Australia.
Genome track alignments using GBrowse on this site are featured with: (1) Annotated and predicted genes and transcripts; (2) QTL / SNP Association tracks; (3) OMIA genes; (4) Various SNP Chip tracks; (5) Other mapping fetures or elements that are available.
The Antimicrobial Peptide Database (APD) was originally created by a graduate student, Zhe Wang, as his master's thesis in the laboratory of Dr. Guangshun Wang. The project was initiated in 2002 and the first version of the database was open to the public in August 2003. It contained 525 peptide entries, which can be searched in multiple ways, including APD ID, peptide name, amino acid sequence, original location, PDB ID, structure, methods for structural determination, peptide length, charge, hydrophobic content, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anticancer, and hemolytic activity. Some results of this bioinformatics tool were reported in the 2004 database paper. The peptide data stored in the APD were gleaned from the literature (PubMed, PDB, Google, and Swiss-Prot) manually in over a decade.
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APID Interactomes is a database that provides a comprehensive collection of protein interactomes for more than 400 organisms based in the integration of known experimentally validated protein-protein physical interactions (PPIs). Construction of the interactomes is done with a methodological approach to report quality levels and coverage over the proteomes for each organism included. In this way, APID provides interactomes from specific organisms that in 25 cases have more than 500 proteins. As a whole APID includes a comprehensive compendium of 90,379 distinct proteins and 678,441 singular interactions. The analytical and integrative effort done in APID unifies PPIs from primary databases of molecular interactions (BIND, BioGRID, DIP, HPRD, IntAct, MINT) and also from experimentally resolved 3D structures (PDB) where more than two distinct proteins have been identified. In this way, 8,388 structures have been analyzed to find specific protein-protein interactions reported with details of their molecular interfaces. APID also includes a new data visualization web-tool that allows the construction of sub-interactomes using query lists of proteins of interest and the visual exploration of the corresponding networks, including an interactive selection of the properties of the interactions (i.e. the reliability of the "edges" in the network) and an interactive mapping of the functional environment of the proteins (i.e. the functional annotations of the "nodes" in the network).
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ArachnoServer is a manually curated database containing information on the sequence, three-dimensional structure, and biological activity of protein toxins derived from spider venom. Spiders are the largest group of venomous animals and they are predicted to contain by far the largest number of pharmacologically active peptide toxins (Escoubas et al., 2006). ArachnoServer has been custom-built so that a wide range of biological scientists, including neuroscientists, pharmacologists, and toxinologists, can readily access key data relevant to their discipline without being overwhelmed by extraneous information.
ASTM International, formerly known as the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), is a globally recognized leader in the development and delivery of international voluntary consensus standards. Today, some 12,000 ASTM standards are used around the world to improve product quality, enhance safety, facilitate market access and trade, and build consumer confidence.
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A collection of high quality multiple sequence alignments for objective, comparative studies of alignment algorithms. The alignments are constructed based on 3D structure superposition and manually refined to ensure alignment of important functional residues. A number of subsets are defined covering many of the most important problems encountered when aligning real sets of proteins. It is specifically designed to serve as an evaluation resource to address all the problems encountered when aligning complete sequences. The first release provided sets of reference alignments dealing with the problems of high variability, unequal repartition and large N/C-terminal extensions and internal insertions. Version 2.0 of the database incorporates three new reference sets of alignments containing structural repeats, trans-membrane sequences and circular permutations to evaluate the accuracy of detection/prediction and alignment of these complex sequences. Within the resource, users can look at a list of all the alignments, download the whole database by ftp, get the "c" program to compare a test alignment with the BAliBASE reference (The source code for the program is freely available), or look at the results of a comparison study of several multiple alignment programs, using BAliBASE reference sets.
The Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) provides DNA barcode data. BOLD's online workbench supports data validation, annotation, and publication for specimen, distributional, and molecular data. The platform consists of four main modules: a data portal, a database of barcode clusters, an educational portal, and a data collection workbench. BOLD is the go-to site for DNA-based identification. As the central informatics platform for DNA barcoding, BOLD plays a crucial role in assimilating and organizing data gathered by the international barcode research community. Two iBOL (International Barcode of Life) Working Groups are supporting the ongoing development of BOLD.
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BaAMPs is the first database dedicated to antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) specifically tested against microbial biofilms. The aim of this project is to provide useful resources for the study of AMPs against biofilms to microbiologist, bioinformatics researcher and medical scientist working in this field in an open-access framework.
>>>!!!<<< As stated 2017-05-16 The BIRN project was finished a few years ago. The web portal is no longer live.>>>!!!<<< BIRN is a national initiative to advance biomedical research through data sharing and online collaboration. It supports multi-site, and/or multi-institutional, teams by enabling researchers to share significant quantities of data across geographic distance and/or incompatible computing systems. BIRN offers a library of data-sharing software tools specific to biomedical research, best practice references, expert advice and other resources.
BioModels is a repository of mathematical models of biological and biomedical systems. It hosts a vast selection of existing literature-based physiologically and pharmaceutically relevant mechanistic models in standard formats. Our mission is to provide the systems modelling community with reproducible, high-quality, freely-accessible models published in the scientific literature.
BioPortal is an open repository of biomedical ontologies, a service that provides access to those ontologies, and a set of tools for working with them. BioPortal provides a wide range of such tools, either directly via the BioPortal web site, or using the BioPortal web service REST API. BioPortal also includes community features for adding notes, reviews, and even mappings to specific ontologies. BioPortal has four major product components: the web application; the API services; widgets, or applets, that can be installed on your own site; and a Virtual Appliance version that is available for download or through Amazon Web Services machine instance (AMI). There is also a beta release SPARQL endpoint.
The BioStudies database holds descriptions of biological studies, links to data from these studies in other databases at EMBL-EBI or outside, as well as data that do not fit in the structured archives at EMBL-EBI. The database accepts submissions via an online tool, or in a simple tab-delimited format. It also enables authors to submit supplementary information and link to it from the publication.
BioVeL is a virtual e-laboratory that supports research on biodiversity issues using large amounts of data from cross-disciplinary sources. BioVeL supports the development and use of workflows to process data. It offers the possibility to either use already made workflows or create own. BioVeL workflows are stored in MyExperiment - Biovel Group http://www.myexperiment.org/groups/643/content. They are underpinned by a range of analytical and data processing functions (generally provided as Web Services or R scripts) to support common biodiversity analysis tasks. You can find the Web Services catalogued in the BiodiversityCatalogue.
We are developing an open, online platform to provide a seamless access to cloud computing infrastructure and brain data and data derivatives. This platform is meant to reach out beyond neuroscience, allowing also computer scientists, statisticians and engineers interested in brain data to use the data to develop and publish their methods. Brain Life is a project under active development. We currently offer several cloud computing services – also called Brain Life Applications. Sixty-six collaborators from global scientific communities contribute to the project by providing data, applications, technology and products to advance understanding the human brain.
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BRENDA is the main collection of enzyme functional data available to the scientific community worldwide. The enzymes are classified according to the Enzyme Commission list of enzymes. It is available free of charge for via the internet (http://www.brenda-enzymes.org/) and as an in-house database for commercial users (requests to our distributor Biobase). The enzymes are classified according to the Enzyme Commission list of enzymes. Some 5000 "different" enzymes are covered. Frequently enzymes with very different properties are included under the same EC number. BRENDA includes biochemical and molecular information on classification, nomenclature, reaction, specificity, functional parameters, occurrence, enzyme structure, application, engineering, stability, disease, isolation, and preparation. The database also provides additional information on ligands, which function as natural or in vitro substrates/products, inhibitors, activating compounds, cofactors, bound metals, and other attributes.
>>>!!!<<< caArray Retirement Announcement >>>!!!<<< The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology (CBIIT) instance of the caArray database was retired on March 31st, 2015. All publicly-accessible caArray data and annotations will be archived and will remain available via FTP download https://wiki.nci.nih.gov/x/UYHeDQ and is also available at GEO http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/ . >>>!!!<<< While NCI will not be able to provide technical support for the caArray software after the retirement, the source code is available on GitHub https://github.com/NCIP/caarray , and we encourage continued community development. Molecular Analysis of Brain Neoplasia (Rembrandt fine-00037) gene expression data has been loaded into ArrayExpress: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/arrayexpress/experiments/E-MTAB-3073 >>>!!!<<< caArray is an open-source, web and programmatically accessible microarray data management system that supports the annotation of microarray data using MAGE-TAB and web-based forms. Data and annotations may be kept private to the owner, shared with user-defined collaboration groups, or made public. The NCI instance of caArray hosts many cancer-related public datasets available for download.
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CEEHRC represents a multi-stage funding commitment by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and multiple Canadian and international partners. The overall aim is to position Canada at the forefront of international efforts to translate new discoveries in the field of epigenetics into improved human health. The two sites will focus on sequencing human reference epigenomes and developing new technologies and protocols; they will also serve as platforms for other CEEHRC funding initiatives, such as catalyst and team grants. The complementary reference epigenome mapping efforts of the two sites will focus on a range of common human diseases. The Vancouver group will focus on the role of epigenetics in the development of cancer, including lymphoma and cancers of the ovary, colon, breast, and thyroid. The Montreal team will focus on autoimmune / inflammatory, cardio-metabolic, and neuropsychiatric diseases, using studies of identical twins as well as animal models of human disease.
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>>>!!!<<< The NCI Cancer Models Database, caMOD, was retired on December 24, 2015. Information about many of the mouse models hosted in caMOD was obtained from the Jackson Laboratory Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB) Database and can be accessed through that resource http://tumor.informatics.jax.org/mtbwi/index.do . See caMOD Retirement Announcement https://wiki.nci.nih.gov/display/caMOD/caMOD+Retirement+Announcement >>>>!!<<< Query the Cancer Models database for models submitted by fellow researchers. Retrieve information about the making of models, their genetic description, histopathology, derived cell lines, associated images, carcinogenic agents, and therapeutic trials. Links to associated publications and other resources are provided.
This is CSDB version 1 merged from Bacterial (BCSDB) and Plant&Fungal (PFCSDB) databases. This database aims at provision of structural, bibliographic, taxonomic, NMR spectroscopic and other information on glycan and glycoconjugate structures of prokaryotic, plant and fungal origin. It has been merged from the Bacterial and Plant&Fungal Carbohydrate Structure Databases (BCSDB+PFCSDB). The key points of this service are: High coverage. The coverage for bacteria (up to 2016) and archaea (up to 2016) is above 80%. Similar coverage for plants and fungi is expected in the future. The database is close to complete up to 1998 for plants, and up to 2006 for fungi. Data quality. High data quality is achieved by manual curation using original publications which is assisted by multiple automatic procedures for error control. Errors present in publications are reported and corrected, when possible. Data from other databases are verified on import. Detailed annotations. Structural data are supplied with extended bibliography, assigned NMR spectra, taxon identification including strains and serogroups, and other information if available in the original publication. Services. CSDB serves as a platform for a number of computational services tuned for glycobiology, such as NMR simulation, automated structure elucidation, taxon clustering, 3D molecular modeling, statistical processing of data etc. Integration. CSDB is cross-linked to other glycoinformatics projects and NCBI databases. The data are exportable in various formats, including most widespread encoding schemes and records using GlycoRDF ontology. Free web access. Users can access the database for free via its web interface (see Help). The main source of data is retrospective literature analysis. About 20% of data were imported from CCSD (Carbbank, University of Georgia, Athens; structures published before 1996) with subsequent manual curation and approval. The current coverage is displayed in red on the top of the left menu. The time lag between the publication of new data and their deposition into CSDB is ca. 1 year. In the scope of bacterial carbohydrates, CSDB covers nearly all structures of this origin published up to 2016. Prokaryotic, plant and fungal means that a glycan was found in the organism(s) belonging to these taxonomic domains or was obtained by modification of those found in them. Carbohydrate means a structure composed of any residues linked by glycosidic, ester, amidic, ketal, phospho- or sulpho-diester bonds in which at least one residue is a sugar or its derivative.
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CAZy is a specialist database dedicated to the display and analysis of genomic, structural and biochemical information on Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes (CAZymes). CAZy data are accessible either by browsing sequence-based families or by browsing the content of genomes in carbohydrate-active enzymes. New genomes are added regularly shortly after they appear in the daily releases of GenBank. New families are created based on published evidence for the activity of at least one member of the family and all families are regularly updated, both in content and in description.