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BLLAST is a research programme aimed at exploring the late afternoon transition of the atmospheric boundary layer. The late afternoon period of the diurnal cycle of the boundary layer is poorly understood. This is yet an important transition period that impacts the transport and dillution of water vapour and trace species. The main questions adressed by the project are: - How the turbulence activity fades when heating by the surface decreases? - What is the impact on the transport of chemical species? - How relevant processes can be represented in numerical models? To answer all these questions, a field campaign was carried out during the summer of 2011 (from June 14 to July 8). Many observation systems were then deployed and operated by research teams coming from France and abroad. They were spanning a large spectrum of space and time scales in order to achieve a comprehensive description of the boundary layer processes. The observation strategy consisted in intensifying the operations in the late afternoon with tethered balloons, resarch aircrafts and UAVs.
International Arctic Systems for Observing the Atmosphere (IASOA) provides and collects multi-year continuous data on atmospheric conditions in the Arctic. International Polar Year (IPY) maintains partnerships with Arctic observatories from Sweden, Canada, United States, Russia, Norway, Finland, and Greenland. Each IASOA observatory features extensive suites of co-located, research grade active, passive and in-situ observing systems. Atmospheric characteristics of interest are standard meteorology, greenhouse gases, atmospheric radiation, clouds, pollutants, chemistry, aerosols, and surface energy balances. IASOA operates within boundaries defined by (1) the Arctic (2) the atmosphere (3) the ground-based vantage point (4) data generated by instrument systems and (5) multi-year continuous records to support climate studies.