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Found 8 result(s)
Climate Data Record (CDR) is a time series of measurements of sufficient length, consistency and continuity to determine climate variability and change. The fundamental CDRs include sensor data, such as calibrated radiances and brightness temperatures, that scientists have improved and quality-controlled along with the data used to calibrate them. The thematic CDRs include geophysical variables derived from the fundamental CDRs, such as sea surface temperature and sea ice concentration, and they are specific to various disciplines.
The Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) is an element of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS). The EOSDIS provides science data to a wide community of users for NASA's Science Mission Directorate. Since the launch of NASA's first ocean-observing satellite, Seasat, in 1978, PO.DAAC has become the premier data center for measurements focused on ocean surface topography (OST), sea surface temperature (SST), ocean winds, sea surface salinity (SSS), gravity, ocean circulation and sea ice.In addition to providing access to its data holdings, PO.DAAC acts as a gateway to data stored at other ocean and climate archives. This and other tools and services enable PO.DAAC to support a wide user community working in areas such as ocean and climate research, applied science and industry, natural resource management, policy making, and general public consumption.
The Ocean Biology Processing Group (OBPG) serves as the Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) for all Ocean Biology (OB) data produced or collected under NASA’s Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS). This website thus serves as the primary data access portal to the NASA OB.DAAC. The links below provide a variety of methods to access the holdings of the OB.DAAC, including visual browsers that enable point-and-click access by data levels and direct access for bulk download. In agreement with partner organizations, some data access requires user registration to enable better tracking of usage metrics.
OceanSITES is a worldwide system of long-term, deepwater reference stations measuring dozens of variables and monitoring the full depth of the ocean from air-sea interactions down to 5,000 meters. Since 1999, the international OceanSITES science team has shared both data and costs in order to capitalize on the enormous potential of these moorings. The growing network now consists of about 30 surface and 30 subsurface arrays. Satellite telemetry enables near real-time access to OceanSITES data by scientists and the public. OceanSITES moorings are an integral part of the Global Ocean Observing System. They complement satellite imagery and ARGO float data by adding the dimensions of time and depth.
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HYdrological cycle in the Mediterranean EXperiemnt. Considering the science and societal issues motivating HyMeX, the programme aims to : improve our understanding of the water cycle, with emphasis on extreme events, by monitoring and modelling the Mediterranean atmosphere-land-ocean coupled system, its variability from the event to the seasonal and interannual scales, and its characteristics over one decade (2010-2020) in the context of global change, assess the social and economic vulnerability to extreme events and adaptation capacity.The multidisciplinary research and the database developed within HyMeX should contribute to: improve observational and modelling systems, especially for coupled systems, better predict extreme events, simulate the long-term water-cycle more accurately, provide guidelines for adaptation measures, especially in the context of global change.
Under the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) the Working Group on Coupled Modelling (WGCM) established the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) as a standard experimental protocol for studying the output of coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs). CMIP provides a community-based infrastructure in support of climate model diagnosis, validation, intercomparison, documentation and data access. This framework enables a diverse community of scientists to analyze GCMs in a systematic fashion, a process which serves to facilitate model improvement. Virtually the entire international climate modeling community has participated in this project since its inception in 1995. The Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) archives much of the CMIP data and provides other support for CMIP. We are now beginning the process towards the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report and with it the CMIP5 intercomparison activity. The CMIP5 (CMIP Phase 5) experiment design has been finalized with the following suites of experiments: I Decadal Hindcasts and Predictions simulations, II "long-term" simulations, III "atmosphere-only" (prescribed SST) simulations for especially computationally-demanding models. The new ESGF peer-to-peer (P2P) enterprise system (http://pcmdi9.llnl.gov) is now the official site for CMIP5 model output. The old gateway (http://pcmdi3.llnl.gov) is deprecated and now shut down permanently.
The Arctic Data Center is the primary data and software repository for the Arctic section of NSF Polar Programs. The Center helps the research community to reproducibly preserve and discover all products of NSF-funded research in the Arctic, including data, metadata, software, documents, and provenance that links these together. The repository is open to contributions from NSF Arctic investigators, and data are released under an open license (CC-BY, CC0, depending on the choice of the contributor). All science, engineering, and education research supported by the NSF Arctic research program are included, such as Natural Sciences (Geoscience, Earth Science, Oceanography, Ecology, Atmospheric Science, Biology, etc.) and Social Sciences (Archeology, Anthropology, Social Science, etc.). Key to the initiative is the partnership between NCEAS at UC Santa Barbara, DataONE, and NOAA’s NCEI, each of which bring critical capabilities to the Center. Infrastructure from the successful NSF-sponsored DataONE federation of data repositories enables data replication to NCEI, providing both offsite and institutional diversity that are critical to long term preservation.
The NSIDC Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) processes, archives, documents, and distributes data from NASA's past and current Earth Observing System (EOS) satellites and field measurement programs. The NSIDC DAAC focuses on the study of the cryosphere. The NSIDC DAAC is one of NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Data Centers.