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Found 10 result(s)
NASA’s Precipitation Measurement Missions – TRMM and GPM – provide advanced information on rain and snow characteristics and detailed three-dimensional knowledge of precipitation structure within the atmosphere, which help scientists study and understand Earth's water cycle, weather and climate.
SCEC's mission includes gathering data on earthquakes, both in Southern California and other locales; integrate the information into a comprehensive understanding of earthquake phenomena; and communicate useful knowledge for reducing earthquake risk to society at large. The SCEC community consists of more than 600 scientists from 16 core institutions and 47 additional participating institutions. SCEC is funded by the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Geological Survey.
The Marine-Geo Digital Library is a digital data repository and metadata catalog funded by the U.S. NSF for marine geoscience data from the seafloor and subseafloor environment acquired with ships, towed platforms and submersibles. We accept submissions of derived data products and supporting field data and provide repository services including data publication, open public access and long term archiving. Primary data types are geophysical field data including active source seismic data, potential field, bathymetry, sidescan sonar, near-bottom imagery, other seafloor senor data as well as a diverse array of processed data and interpreted data products (e.g. seismic interpretations, microseismicity catalogs, geologic maps and interpretations, photomosaics and visualizations). Our data resources support scientists working broadly on solid earth science problems ranging from mid-ocean ridge, subduction zone and hotspot processes, to geohazards, continental margin evolution, sediment transport at glaciated and unglaciated margins.
On February 24, 2000, Terra began collecting what will ultimately become a new, 15-year global data set on which to base scientific investigations about our complex home planet. Together with the entire fleet of EOS spacecraft, Terra is helping scientists unravel the mysteries of climate and environmental change. TERRA's data collection instruments include: Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES), Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR), Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Measurement of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT)
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The Norwegian Polar Institute is a governmental institution for scientific research, mapping and environmental monitoring in the Arctic and the Antarctic. The institute’s Polar Data Centre (NPDC) manages and provides access to scientific data, environmental monitoring data, and topographic and geological map data from the polar regions. The scientific datasets are ranging from human field observations, through in situ and moving sensor data, to remote sensing products. The institute's data holdings also include photographic images, audio and video records.
Country
Volare is the repository of the Vorarlberger Landesbibliothek (Vorarlberg State Library). Digital Objects are made end-user-friendly available and they are secured in a long term. Pupils, students, patrimonial researchers but also the general public can use the imagery for various purposes. Volare facilitates access to regional, social and cultural history research. Volare encourages those who rediscover their native place or their holiday desination or just generally want to browse in the past.
The Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth hosts the best and most complete online collection of astronaut photographs of the Earth from 1961 through the present. This service is provided by the International Space Station program and the JSC Earth Science & Remote Sensing Unit, ARES Division, Exploration Integration Science Directorate.
This site contains active weather alerts, warnings, watches, and advisories concerning the US State of Alaska and the surrounding waters. Near-real time data are available as are historical records. Links to the National Data Buoy Center are provided for coastal and ocean conditions around Alaska.
The THEMIS mission is a five-satellite Explorer mission whose primary objective is to understand the onset and macroscale evolution of magnetospheric substorms. The five small satellites were launched together on a Delta II rocket and they carry identical sets of instruments including an electric field instrument (EFI), a flux gate magnetometer (FGM), a search coil magnetometer (SCM), a electro-static analyzer, and solid state telescopes (SST). The mission consists of several phases. In the first phase, the spacecraft will all orbit as a tight cluster in the same orbital plane with apogee at 15.4 Earth radii (RE). In the second phase, also called the Dawn Phase, the satellites will be placed in their orbits and during this time their apogees will be on the dawn side of the magnetosphere. During the third phase (also known as the Tail Science Phase) the apogees will be in the magnetotail. The fourth phase is called the Dusk Phase or Radiation Belt Science Phase, with all apogees on the dusk side. In the fifth and final phase, the apogees will shift to the sunward side (Dayside Science Phase). The satellite data will be combined with observations of the aurora from a network of 20 ground observatories across the North American continent. The THEMIS-B (THEMIS-P1) and THEMIS-C (THEMIS-P2) were repurposed to study the lunar environment in 2009. The spacecraft were renamed ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence and Electrodynamics of the Moon’s Interaction with the Sun), with the P1 and P2 designations maintained.