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Found 8 result(s)
nanoHUB.org is the premier place for computational nanotechnology research, education, and collaboration. Our site hosts a rapidly growing collection of Simulation Programs for nanoscale phenomena that run in the cloud and are accessible through a web browser. In addition to simulation devices, nanoHUB provides Online Presentations, Courses, Learning Modules, Podcasts, Animations, Teaching Materials, and more. These resources help users learn about our simulation programs and about nanotechnology in general. Our site offers researchers a venue to explore, collaborate, and publish content, as well. Much of these collaborative efforts occur via Workspaces and User groups.
SOHO, the Solar & Heliospheric Observatory, is a project of international collaboration between ESA and NASA to study the Sun from its deep core to the outer corona and the solar wind. SOHO was launched on December 2, 1995. The SOHO spacecraft was built in Europe by an industry team led by prime contractor Matra Marconi Space (now EADS Astrium) under overall management by ESA. The twelve instruments on board SOHO were provided by European and American scientists.
Established in 1965, the CSD is the world’s repository for small-molecule organic and metal-organic crystal structures. Containing the results of over one million x-ray and neutron diffraction analyses this unique database of accurate 3D structures has become an essential resource to scientists around the world. The CSD records bibliographic, chemical and crystallographic information for:organic molecules, metal-organic compounds whose 3D structures have been determined using X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction. The CSD records results of: single crystal studies, powder diffraction studies which yield 3D atomic coordinate data for at least all non-H atoms. In some cases the CCDC is unable to obtain coordinates, and incomplete entries are archived to the CSD. The CSD includes crystal structure data arising from: publications in the open literature and Private Communications to the CSD (via direct data deposition). The CSD contains directly deposited data that are not available anywhere else, known as CSD Communications.
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Nobeyama Radio Polarimeters (NoRP) are observing the Sun with multiple frequencies in the microwave range. It is capable to obtain the total coming flux and the circular-polarization degree.
The datacommons@psu was developed in 2005 to provide a resource for data sharing, discovery, and archiving for the Penn State research and teaching community. Access to information is vital to the research, teaching, and outreach conducted at Penn State. The datacommons@psu serves as a data discovery tool, a data archive for research data created by PSU for projects funded by agencies like the National Science Foundation, as well as a portal to data, applications, and resources throughout the university. The datacommons@psu facilitates interdisciplinary cooperation and collaboration by connecting people and resources and by: Acquiring, storing, documenting, and providing discovery tools for Penn State based research data, final reports, instruments, models and applications. Highlighting existing resources developed or housed by Penn State. Supporting access to project/program partners via collaborative map or web services. Providing metadata development citation information, Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) and links to related publications and project websites. Members of the Penn State research community and their affiliates can easily share and house their data through the datacommons@psu. The datacommons@psu will also develop metadata for your data and provide information to support your NSF, NIH, or other agency data management plan.
The Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth hosts the best and most complete online collection of astronaut photographs of the Earth from 1961 through the present. This service is provided by the International Space Station program and the JSC Earth Science & Remote Sensing Unit, ARES Division, Exploration Integration Science Directorate.
When published in 2005, the Millennium Run was the largest ever simulation of the formation of structure within the ΛCDM cosmology. It uses 10(10) particles to follow the dark matter distribution in a cubic region 500h(−1)Mpc on a side, and has a spatial resolution of 5h−1kpc. Application of simplified modelling techniques to the stored output of this calculation allows the formation and evolution of the ~10(7) galaxies more luminous than the Small Magellanic Cloud to be simulated for a variety of assumptions about the detailed physics involved. As part of the activities of the German Astrophysical Virtual Observatory we have created relational databases to store the detailed assembly histories both of all the haloes and subhaloes resolved by the simulation, and of all the galaxies that form within these structures for two independent models of the galaxy formation physics. We have implemented a Structured Query Language (SQL) server on these databases. This allows easy access to many properties of the galaxies and halos, as well as to the spatial and temporal relations between them. Information is output in table format compatible with standard Virtual Observatory tools. With this announcement (from 1/8/2006) we are making these structures fully accessible to all users. Interested scientists can learn SQL and test queries on a small, openly accessible version of the Millennium Run (with volume 1/512 that of the full simulation). They can then request accounts to run similar queries on the databases for the full simulations. In 2008 and 2012 the simulations were repeated.