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Found 23 result(s)
The DOE Data Explorer (DDE) is an information tool to help you locate DOE's collections of data and non-text information and, at the same time, retrieve individual datasets within some of those collections. It includes collection citations prepared by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, as well as citations for individual datasets submitted from DOE Data Centers and other organizations.
nanoHUB.org is the premier place for computational nanotechnology research, education, and collaboration. Our site hosts a rapidly growing collection of Simulation Programs for nanoscale phenomena that run in the cloud and are accessible through a web browser. In addition to simulation devices, nanoHUB provides Online Presentations, Courses, Learning Modules, Podcasts, Animations, Teaching Materials, and more. These resources help users learn about our simulation programs and about nanotechnology in general. Our site offers researchers a venue to explore, collaborate, and publish content, as well. Much of these collaborative efforts occur via Workspaces and User groups.
SOHO, the Solar & Heliospheric Observatory, is a project of international collaboration between ESA and NASA to study the Sun from its deep core to the outer corona and the solar wind. SOHO was launched on December 2, 1995. The SOHO spacecraft was built in Europe by an industry team led by prime contractor Matra Marconi Space (now EADS Astrium) under overall management by ESA. The twelve instruments on board SOHO were provided by European and American scientists.
The National Science Digital Library provides high quality online educational resources for teaching and learning, with current emphasis on the sciences, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines—both formal and informal, institutional and individual, in local, state, national, and international educational settings. The NSDL collection contains structured descriptive information (metadata) about web-based educational resources held on other sites by their providers. These providers have contribute this metadata to NSDL for organized search and open access to educational resources via this website and its services.
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The Data Center for Aurora in NIPR is responsible for data archiving and dissemination of all-sky camera observations, visual observations, other optical observations (such as TV and photometric observations), auroral image and particle observations from satellites, geomagnetic observations, and observations of upper atmosphere phenomena associated with aurora such as ULF, VLF and CNA activities. This Data Catalogue summarizes the collection of data sets, data books, related publications and facilities available in the WDC for Aurora as of December 2003. The WDC for Aurora changed its name as "Data Center for Aurora in NIPR" in 2008 due to the disappearance of the WDC panel in ICSU.
Established in 1965, the CSD is the world’s repository for small-molecule organic and metal-organic crystal structures. Containing the results of over one million x-ray and neutron diffraction analyses this unique database of accurate 3D structures has become an essential resource to scientists around the world. The CSD records bibliographic, chemical and crystallographic information for:organic molecules, metal-organic compounds whose 3D structures have been determined using X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction. The CSD records results of: single crystal studies, powder diffraction studies which yield 3D atomic coordinate data for at least all non-H atoms. In some cases the CCDC is unable to obtain coordinates, and incomplete entries are archived to the CSD. The CSD includes crystal structure data arising from: publications in the open literature and Private Communications to the CSD (via direct data deposition). The CSD contains directly deposited data that are not available anywhere else, known as CSD Communications.
The POES satellite system offers the advantage of daily global coverage, by making nearly polar orbits 14 times per day approximately 520 miles above the surface of the Earth. The Earth's rotation allows the satellite to see a different view with each orbit, and each satellite provides two complete views of weather around the world each day. NOAA partners with the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) to constantly operate two polar-orbiting satellites – one POES and one European polar-orbiting satellite called Metop. NOAA's Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES) carry a suite of instruments that measure the flux of energetic ions and electrons at the altitude of the satellite. This environment varies as a result of solar and geomagnetic activity. Beginning with the NOAA-15 satellite, an upgraded version of the Space Environment Monitor (SEM-2) has been flown.
Country
Nobeyama Radio Polarimeters (NoRP) are observing the Sun with multiple frequencies in the microwave range. It is capable to obtain the total coming flux and the circular-polarization degree.
WDC for STP, Moscow collects, stores, exchanges with other WDCs, disseminates the publications, sends upon requests data on the following Solar-Terrestrial Physics disciplines: Solar Activity and Interplanetary Medium, Cosmic Rays, Ionospheric Phenomena, Geomagnetic Variations.
The SAR Data Center has a large data archive of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) from a variety of sensors available at no cost. Much of the SAR data in the ASF SDC archive is limited in distribution to the scientific research community and U.S. Government Agencies. In accordance with the Memoranda of Understanding (MOU) between the relevant flight agencies (CSA, ESA, JAXA) and the U.S. State Department, the ASF SDC does not distribute SAR data for commercial use. The research community can access the data (ERS-1, ERS-2, JERS-1, RADARSAT-1, and ALOS PALSAR) via a brief proposal process.
----<<<< This repository is no longer available. This record is out-dated !!!!! >>>>> ----- Science3D is an Open Access project to archive and curate scientific data and make them available to everyone interested in scientific endeavours. Science3D focusses mainly on 3D tomography data from biological samples, simply because theses object make it comparably easy to understand the concepts and techniques. The data come primarily from the imaging beamlines of the Helmholtz Center Geesthacht (HZG), which make use of the uniquely bright and coherent X-rays of the Petra3 synchrotron. Petra3 - like many other photon and neutron sources in Europe and World-wide - is a fantastic instrument to investigate the microscopic detail of matter and organisms. The experiments at photon science beamlines hence provide unique insights into all kind of scientific fields, ranging from medical applications to plasma physics. The success of these experiments demands enormous efforts of the scientists and quite some investments
The datacommons@psu was developed in 2005 to provide a resource for data sharing, discovery, and archiving for the Penn State research and teaching community. Access to information is vital to the research, teaching, and outreach conducted at Penn State. The datacommons@psu serves as a data discovery tool, a data archive for research data created by PSU for projects funded by agencies like the National Science Foundation, as well as a portal to data, applications, and resources throughout the university. The datacommons@psu facilitates interdisciplinary cooperation and collaboration by connecting people and resources and by: Acquiring, storing, documenting, and providing discovery tools for Penn State based research data, final reports, instruments, models and applications. Highlighting existing resources developed or housed by Penn State. Supporting access to project/program partners via collaborative map or web services. Providing metadata development citation information, Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) and links to related publications and project websites. Members of the Penn State research community and their affiliates can easily share and house their data through the datacommons@psu. The datacommons@psu will also develop metadata for your data and provide information to support your NSF, NIH, or other agency data management plan.
The Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth hosts the best and most complete online collection of astronaut photographs of the Earth from 1961 through the present. This service is provided by the International Space Station program and the JSC Earth Science & Remote Sensing Unit, ARES Division, Exploration Integration Science Directorate.
The Solar Data Analysis Center serves data from recent and current space-based solar-physics missions, funds and hosts much of the SolarSoft library, and leads the Virtual Solar Observatory (VSO) effort. SDAC is the active archive, providing network access to data from such missions as SOHO, Yohkoh, and TRACE.
This website is a portal that enables access to multi-Terabyte turbulence databases. The data reside on several nodes and disks on our database cluster computer and are stored in small 3D subcubes. Positions are indexed using a Z-curve for efficient access.
The EXFOR library contains an extensive compilation of experimental nuclear reaction data. Neutron reactions have been compiled systematically since the discovery of the neutron, while charged particle and photon reactions have been covered less extensively.
The Space Physics Interactive Data Resource from NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center allows solar terrestrial physics customers to intelligently access and manage historical space physics data for integration with environment models and space weather forecasts.
The main goal of the CLUES-project is to provide constrained simulations of the local universe designed to be used as a numerical laboratory of the current paradigm. The simulations will be used for unprecedented analysis of the complex dark matter and gasdynamical processes which govern the formation of galaxies. The predictions of these experiments can be easily compared with the detailed observations of our galactic neighborhood. Some of the CLUES data is now publicly available via the CosmoSim database (https://www.cosmosim.org/). This includes AHF halo catalogues from the Box 64, WMAP3 resimulations of the Local Group with 40963 particle resolution.
RAVE (RAdial Velocity Experiment) is a multi-fiber spectroscopic astronomical survey of stars in the Milky Way using the 1.2-m UK Schmidt Telescope of the Anglo-Australian Observatory (AAO). The RAVE collaboration consists of researchers from over 20 institutions around the world and is coordinated by the Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam.As a southern hemisphere survey covering 20,000 square degrees of the sky, RAVE's primary aim is to derive the radial velocity of stars from the observed spectra. Additional information is also derived such as effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, photometric parallax and elemental abundance data for the stars. The survey represents a giant leap forward in our understanding of our own Milky Way galaxy; with RAVE's vast stellar kinematic database the structure, formation and evolution of our Galaxy can be studied.
STScI's innovative ways to share Hubble's remarkable discoveries with the public.HubbleSite prepares and disseminates the photographs and animations seen in the news... as well as posters, slide shows, exhibits, and educational products in print and electronic formats
When published in 2005, the Millennium Run was the largest ever simulation of the formation of structure within the ΛCDM cosmology. It uses 10(10) particles to follow the dark matter distribution in a cubic region 500h(−1)Mpc on a side, and has a spatial resolution of 5h−1kpc. Application of simplified modelling techniques to the stored output of this calculation allows the formation and evolution of the ~10(7) galaxies more luminous than the Small Magellanic Cloud to be simulated for a variety of assumptions about the detailed physics involved. As part of the activities of the German Astrophysical Virtual Observatory we have created relational databases to store the detailed assembly histories both of all the haloes and subhaloes resolved by the simulation, and of all the galaxies that form within these structures for two independent models of the galaxy formation physics. We have implemented a Structured Query Language (SQL) server on these databases. This allows easy access to many properties of the galaxies and halos, as well as to the spatial and temporal relations between them. Information is output in table format compatible with standard Virtual Observatory tools. With this announcement (from 1/8/2006) we are making these structures fully accessible to all users. Interested scientists can learn SQL and test queries on a small, openly accessible version of the Millennium Run (with volume 1/512 that of the full simulation). They can then request accounts to run similar queries on the databases for the full simulations. In 2008 and 2012 the simulations were repeated.
NASA officially has launched a new resource to help the public search and download out-of-this-world images, videos and audio files by keyword and metadata searches from NASA.gov. The NASA Image and Video Library website consolidates imagery spread across more than 60 collections into one searchable location. NASA Image and Video Library allows users to search, discover and download a treasure trove of more than 140,000 NASA images, videos and audio files from across the agency’s many missions in aeronautics, astrophysics, Earth science, human spaceflight, and more. Users can browse the agency’s most recently uploaded files, as well as discover historic and the most popularly searched images, audio files and videos. Other features include: Automatically scales the interface for mobile phones and tablets Displays the EXIF/camera data that includes exposure, lens used, and other information, when available from the original image Allows for easy public access to high resolution files All video includes a downloadable caption file NASA Image and Video Library’s Application Programmers Interface (API) allows automation of imagery uploads for NASA, and gives members of the public the ability to embed content in their own sites and applications. This public site runs on NASA’s cloud native “infrastructure-as-a-code” technology enabling on-demand use in the cloud.