Filter
Reset all

Subjects

Content Types

Countries

API

Certificates

Data access

Data access restrictions

Database access

Database access restrictions

Database licenses

Data licenses

Data upload

Data upload restrictions

Enhanced publication

Institution responsibility type

Institution type

Keywords

Metadata standards

PID systems

Provider types

Quality management

Repository languages

Software

Syndications

Repository types

Versioning

  • * at the end of a keyword allows wildcard searches
  • " quotes can be used for searching phrases
  • + represents an AND search (default)
  • | represents an OR search
  • - represents a NOT operation
  • ( and ) implies priority
  • ~N after a word specifies the desired edit distance (fuzziness)
  • ~N after a phrase specifies the desired slop amount
  • 1 (current)
Found 6 result(s)
Jason is a remote-controlled deep-diving vessel that gives shipboard scientists immediate, real-time access to the sea floor. Instead of making short, expensive dives in a submarine, scientists can stay on deck and guide Jason as deep as 6,500 meters (4 miles) to explore for days on end. Jason is a type of remotely operated vehicle (ROV), a free-swimming vessel connected by a long fiberoptic tether to its research ship. The 10-km (6 mile) tether delivers power and instructions to Jason and fetches data from it.
The Plant Metabolic Network (PMN) provides a broad network of plant metabolic pathway databases that contain curated information from the literature and computational analyses about the genes, enzymes, compounds, reactions, and pathways involved in primary and secondary metabolism in plants. The PMN currently houses one multi-species reference database called PlantCyc and 22 species/taxon-specific databases.
The HEASARC is a multi-mission astronomy archive for the EUV, X-ray, and Gamma ray wave bands. Because EUV, X and Gamma rays cannot reach the Earth's surface it is necessary to place the telescopes and sensors on spacecraft. The HEASARC now holds the data from 25 observatories covering over 30 years of X-ray, extreme-ultraviolet and gamma-ray astronomy. Data and software from many of the older missions were restored by the HEASARC staff. Examples of these archived missions include ASCA, BeppoSAX, Chandra, Compton GRO, HEAO 1, Einstein Observatory (HEAO 2), EUVE, EXOSAT, HETE-2, INTEGRAL, ROSAT, Rossi XTE, Suzaku, Swift, and XMM-Newton.
The Bavarian Archive for Speech Signals (BAS) is a public institution hosted by the University of Munich. This institution was founded with the aim of making corpora of current spoken German available to both the basic research and the speech technology communities via a maximally comprehensive digital speech-signal database. The speech material will be structured in a manner allowing flexible and precise access, with acoustic-phonetic and linguistic-phonetic evaluation forming an integral part of it.
The NCAR is a federally funded research and development center committed to research and education in atmospheric science and related scientific fields. NCAR seeks to support and enhance the scientific community nationally and globally by monitoring and researching the atmosphere and related physical and biological systems. Users can access climate and earth models created to better understand the atmosphere, the Earth and the Sun; as well as data from various NCAR research programs and projects. NCAR is sponsored by the National Science Foundation in addition to various other U.S. agencies.
The THEMIS mission is a five-satellite Explorer mission whose primary objective is to understand the onset and macroscale evolution of magnetospheric substorms. The five small satellites were launched together on a Delta II rocket and they carry identical sets of instruments including an electric field instrument (EFI), a flux gate magnetometer (FGM), a search coil magnetometer (SCM), a electro-static analyzer, and solid state telescopes (SST). The mission consists of several phases. In the first phase, the spacecraft will all orbit as a tight cluster in the same orbital plane with apogee at 15.4 Earth radii (RE). In the second phase, also called the Dawn Phase, the satellites will be placed in their orbits and during this time their apogees will be on the dawn side of the magnetosphere. During the third phase (also known as the Tail Science Phase) the apogees will be in the magnetotail. The fourth phase is called the Dusk Phase or Radiation Belt Science Phase, with all apogees on the dusk side. In the fifth and final phase, the apogees will shift to the sunward side (Dayside Science Phase). The satellite data will be combined with observations of the aurora from a network of 20 ground observatories across the North American continent. The THEMIS-B (THEMIS-P1) and THEMIS-C (THEMIS-P2) were repurposed to study the lunar environment in 2009. The spacecraft were renamed ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence and Electrodynamics of the Moon’s Interaction with the Sun), with the P1 and P2 designations maintained.