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Found 19 result(s)
Academic Commons provides open, persistent access to the scholarship produced by researchers at Columbia University, Barnard College, Jewish Theological Seminary, Teachers College, and Union Theological Seminary. Academic Commons is a program of the Columbia University Libraries. Academic Commons accepts articles, dissertations, research data, presentations, working papers, videos, and more.
In keeping with the open data policies of the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Cereal Systems Initiative for South Asia (CSISA) has launched the CSISA Data Repository to ensure public accessibility to key data sets, including crop cut data- directly observed, crop yield estimates, on-station and on-farm research trial data and socioeconomic surveys. CSISA is a science-driven and impact-oriented regional initiative for increasing the productivity of cereal-based cropping systems in Bangladesh, India and Nepal, thus improving food security and farmers’ livelihoods. CSISA generates data that is of value and interest to a diverse audience of researchers, policymakers and the public. CSISA’s data repository is hosted on Dataverse, an open source web application developed at Harvard University to share, preserve, cite, explore and analyze research data. CSISA’s repository contains rich datasets, including on-station trial data from 2009–17 about crop and resource management practices for sustainable future cereal-based cropping systems. Collection of this data occurred during the long-term, on-station research trials conducted at the Indian Council of Agricultural Research – Research Complex for the Eastern Region in Bihar, India. The data include information on agronomic management for the sustainable intensification of cropping systems, mechanization, diversification, futuristic approaches to sustainable intensification, long-term effects of conservation agriculture practices on soil health and the pest spectrum. Additional trial data in the repository includes nutrient omission plot technique trials from Bihar, eastern Uttar Pradesh and Odisha, India, covering 2012–15, which help determine the indigenous nutrient supplying ability of the soil. This data helps develop precision nutrient management approaches that would be most effective in different types of soils. CSISA’s most popular dataset thus far includes crop cut data on maize in Odisha, India and rice in Nepal. Crop cut datasets provide ground-truthed yield estimates, as well as valuable information on relevant agronomic and socioeconomic practices affecting production practices and yield. A variety of research data on wheat systems are also available from Bangladesh and India. Additional crop cut data will also be coming online soon. Cropping system-related data and socioeconomic data are in the repository, some of which are cross-listed with a Dataverse run by the International Food Policy Research Institute. The socioeconomic datasets contain baseline information that is crucial for technology targeting, as well as to assess the adoption and performance of CSISA-supported technologies under smallholder farmers’ constrained conditions, representing the ultimate litmus test of their potential for change at scale. Other highly interesting datasets include farm composition and productive trajectory information, based on a 20-year panel dataset, and numerous wheat crop cut and maize nutrient omission trial data from across Bangladesh.
ISRIC - World Soil Information is an independent foundation. As regular member of the ICS World Data System it is also known as World Data Centre for Soils (WDC-Soils). ISRIC was founded in 1966 through the International Soil Science Society (ISSS) and United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). It has a mission to serve the international community with information about the world’s soil resources to help addressing major global issues. Our work is organised according to four work streams: 1) Setting standards and references, 2) Soil information provision (databases & soil mapping), 3) Capcaity building and advocacy, and 4) Generation of derived products.
The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute is a charitably funded genomic research centre located in Hinxton, nine miles south of Cambridge in the UK. We study diseases that have an impact on health globally by investigating genomes. Building on our past achievements and based on priorities that exploit the unique expertise of our Faculty of researchers, we will lead global efforts to understand the biology of genomes. We are convinced of the importance of making this research available and accessible for all audiences. reduce global health burdens.
TreeGenes is a genomic, phenotypic, and environmental data resource for forest tree species. The TreeGenes database and Dendrome project provide custom informatics tools to manage the flood of information.The database contains several curated modules that support the storage of data and provide the foundation for web-based searches and visualization tools. GMOD GUI tools such as CMAP for genetic maps and GBrowse for genome and transcriptome assemblies are implemented here. A sample tracking system, known as the Forest Tree Genetic Stock Center, sits at the forefront of most large-scale projects. Barcode identifiers assigned to the trees during sample collection are maintained in the database to identify an individual through DNA extraction, resequencing, genotyping and phenotyping. DiversiTree, a user-friendly desktop-style interface, queries the TreeGenes database and is designed for bulk retrieval of resequencing data. CartograTree combines geo-referenced individuals with relevant ecological and trait databases in a user-friendly map-based interface. ---- The Conifer Genome Network (CGN) is a virtual nexus for researchers working in conifer genomics. The CGN web site is maintained by the Dendrome Project at the University of California, Davis.
AgBase is a curated, open-source, Web-accessible resource for functional analysis of agricultural plant and animal gene products. Our long-term goal is to serve the needs of the agricultural research communities by facilitating post-genome biology for agriculture researchers and for those researchers primarily using agricultural species as biomedical models.
The datacommons@psu was developed in 2005 to provide a resource for data sharing, discovery, and archiving for the Penn State research and teaching community. Access to information is vital to the research, teaching, and outreach conducted at Penn State. The datacommons@psu serves as a data discovery tool, a data archive for research data created by PSU for projects funded by agencies like the National Science Foundation, as well as a portal to data, applications, and resources throughout the university. The datacommons@psu facilitates interdisciplinary cooperation and collaboration by connecting people and resources and by: Acquiring, storing, documenting, and providing discovery tools for Penn State based research data, final reports, instruments, models and applications. Highlighting existing resources developed or housed by Penn State. Supporting access to project/program partners via collaborative map or web services. Providing metadata development citation information, Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) and links to related publications and project websites. Members of the Penn State research community and their affiliates can easily share and house their data through the datacommons@psu. The datacommons@psu will also develop metadata for your data and provide information to support your NSF, NIH, or other agency data management plan.
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Edmond is the institutional repository of the Max Planck Society for public research data. It enables Max Planck scientists to create citable scientific assets by describing, enriching, sharing, exposing, linking, publishing and archiving research data of all kinds. A unique feature of Edmond is the dedicated metadata management, which supports a non-restrictive metadata schema definition, as simple as you like or as complex as your parameters require. Further on, all objects within Edmond have a unique identifier and therefore can be clearly referenced in publications or reused in other contexts.
The range of CIRAD's research has given rise to numerous datasets and databases associating various types of data: primary (collected), secondary (analysed, aggregated, used for scientific articles, etc), qualitative and quantitative. These "collections" of research data are used for comparisons, to study processes and analyse change. They include: genetics and genomics data, data generated by trials and measurements (using laboratory instruments), data generated by modelling (interpolations, predictive models), long-term observation data (remote sensing, observatories, etc), data from surveys, cohorts, interviews with players.
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CURATOR (Chiba University's Repository for Access to Outcomes from Research) captures, preserves and makes publicly available intellectual digital materials from research activities on Chiba University campuses, including peer-reviewed articles, theses, preprints, statistical and experimental data, course materials and softwares. CURATOR is intended to function as the portal for the outcomes from Chiba University's research activities. The University Library is responsible for building and operating CURATOR under the guidance of the Faculty Committee for Improved Scholarly Information Availability, which commissioned by the Library Board of Faculty Representatives to systematically promote and arrange disseminative activities by the University.
The Arctic Data Center is the primary data and software repository for the Arctic section of NSF Polar Programs. The Center helps the research community to reproducibly preserve and discover all products of NSF-funded research in the Arctic, including data, metadata, software, documents, and provenance that links these together. The repository is open to contributions from NSF Arctic investigators, and data are released under an open license (CC-BY, CC0, depending on the choice of the contributor). All science, engineering, and education research supported by the NSF Arctic research program are included, such as Natural Sciences (Geoscience, Earth Science, Oceanography, Ecology, Atmospheric Science, Biology, etc.) and Social Sciences (Archeology, Anthropology, Social Science, etc.). Key to the initiative is the partnership between NCEAS at UC Santa Barbara, DataONE, and NOAA’s NCEI, each of which bring critical capabilities to the Center. Infrastructure from the successful NSF-sponsored DataONE federation of data repositories enables data replication to NCEI, providing both offsite and institutional diversity that are critical to long term preservation.
IPM Images is a project of the University of Georgia’s Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health and one of the four major parts of BugwoodImages. The Focus is on Integrated Pest Management. It provides an easily accessible archive of high quality images for use in educational applications. In most cases, the images found in this system were taken by and loaned to us by photographers other than ourselves. Most are in the realm of public sector images. The photographs are in this system to be used