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Found 13 result(s)
SAHFOS is an internationally funded independent research non-profit organisation responsible for the operation of the Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR) Survey. As a large-scale global survey, it provides the scientific and policy communities with a basin-wide and long-term measure of the ecological health of marine plankton. Established in 1931, the CPR Survey is the longest running, most geographically extensive marine ecological survey in the world. It has a considerable database of marine plankton and associated metadata that is used by researchers and policy makers to examine strategically important science pillars such as climate change, human health, fisheries, biodiversity, pathogens, invasive species, ocean acidification and natural capital.
Country
The Atlantic Canada Conservation Data Centre (ACCDC) maintains comprehensive lists of plant and animal species. The Atlantic CDC has geo-located records of species occurrences and records of extremely rare to uncommon species in the Atlantic region, including New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland, and Labrador. The Atlantic CDC also maintains biological and other types of data in a variety of linked databases.
Copernicus is a European system for monitoring the Earth. Copernicus consists of a complex set of systems which collect data from multiple sources: earth observation satellites and in situ sensors such as ground stations, airborne and sea-borne sensors. It processes these data and provides users with reliable and up-to-date information through a set of services related to environmental and security issues. The services address six thematic areas: land monitoring, marine monitoring, atmosphere monitoring, climate change, emergency management and security. The main users of Copernicus services are policymakers and public authorities who need the information to develop environmental legislation and policies or to take critical decisions in the event of an emergency, such as a natural disaster or a humanitarian crisis. Based on the Copernicus services and on the data collected through the Sentinels and the contributing missions , many value-added services can be tailored to specific public or commercial needs, resulting in new business opportunities. In fact, several economic studies have already demonstrated a huge potential for job creation, innovation and growth.
The NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information (formerly the National Geophysical Data Center) provide scientific stewardship, products and services for sea floor and lakebed data, including geophysics (gravity, magnetics, seismic reflection, bathymetry, water column sonar), and data derived from sediment and rock samples. NCEI compiles coastal and global digital elevation models, high-resolution models for tsunami inundation studies, provides stewardship for NOS data supporting charts and navigation, and is the US national long-term archive for MGG data
The Academic Seismic Portal (ASP) at UTIG serves up seismic and other data acquired on marine geology and geophysics cruises. Web access provides the public a unique opportunity to look beneath the world's ocean floor.
The Antarctic and Southern Ocean Data Portal, part of the US Antarctic Data Consortium, provides access to geoscience data, primarily marine, from the Antarctic region. The synthesis began in 2003 as the Antarctic Multibeam Bathymetry and Geophysical Data Synthesis (AMBS) with a focus on multibeam bathymetry field data and other geophysical data from the Southern Ocean collected with the R/V N. B. Palmer. In 2005, the effort was expanded to include all routine underway geophysical and oceanographic data collected with both the R/V N. B. Palmer and R/V L. Gould, the two primary research vessels serving the US Antarctic Program.
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Launched in November 1995, RADARSAT-1 provided Canada and the world with an operational radar satellite system capable of timely delivery of large amounts of data. Equipped with a powerful synthetic aperture radar (SAR) instrument, it acquired images of the Earth day or night, in all weather and through cloud cover, smoke and haze. RADARSAT-1 was a Canadian-led project involving the Canadian federal government, the Canadian provinces, the United States, and the private sector. It provided useful information to both commercial and scientific users in such fields as disaster management, interferometry, agriculture, cartography, hydrology, forestry, oceanography, ice studies and coastal monitoring.
The NCMA maintains the largest and most diverse collection of publically available marine algal strains in the world. The algal strains in the collection have been obtained from all over the world, from polar to tropical waters, marine, freshwater, brackish, and hyper-saline environments. New strains (50 - 100 per year) are added largely through the accession of strains deposited by scientists in the community. A stringent accession policy is required to help populate the collection with a diverse range of strains.
Paleoclimatology data are derived from natural sources such as tree rings, ice cores, corals, and ocean and lake sediments. These proxy climate data extend the archive of weather and climate information hundreds to millions of years. The data include geophysical or biological measurement time series and some reconstructed climate variables such as temperature and precipitation. NCEI provides the paleoclimatology data and information scientists need to understand natural climate variability and future climate change. We also operate the World Data Center for Paleoclimatology, which archives and distributes data contributed by scientists around the world.
Country
The Norwegian Meteorological Institute supplies climate observation and weather data and forecasts for the country and surrounding waters. In addition commercial services are provided to fit customers requirements. Meteorological Institute provides data from: Norwegian Satellite Earth Observation Database for Marine and Polar Research (NORMAP), Arctic Data Centre (WMO-WIS), Ocean and Sea Ice SAF (OSI SAF), Norwegian Ice Service (Istjenesten)
The Met Office is the UK's National Weather Service. We have a long history of weather forecasting and have been working in the area of climate change for more than two decades. As a world leader in providing weather and climate services, we employ more than 1,800 at 60 locations throughout the world. We are recognised as one of the world's most accurate forecasters, using more than 10 million weather observations a day, an advanced atmospheric model and a high performance supercomputer to create 3,000 tailored forecasts and briefings a day. These are delivered to a huge range of customers from the Government, to businesses, the general public, armed forces, and other organisations.
Kochi Core Center (KCC) houses one of the 3 Inernationational Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) core repositories, accompanied by images and x-ray CT scanning data viewable by the Virtual Core Library. And it hosts Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) marine core samples and associated analytical data for general scientific or educational uses, after 2 years have passed since collection of core samples.