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Found 76 result(s)
BindingDB is a public, web-accessible database of measured binding affinities, focusing chiefly on the interactions of proteins considered to be candidate drug-targets with ligands that are small, drug-like molecules. BindingDB supports medicinal chemistry and drug discovery via literature awareness and development of structure-activity relations (SAR and QSAR); validation of computational chemistry and molecular modeling approaches such as docking, scoring and free energy methods; chemical biology and chemical genomics; and basic studies of the physical chemistry of molecular recognition. BindingDB also includes a small collection of host-guest binding data of interest to chemists studying supramolecular systems. The data collection derives from a variety of measurement techniques, including enzyme inhibition and kinetics, isothermal titration calorimetry, NMR, and radioligand and competition assays. BindingDB includes data extracted from the literature by the BindingDB project, selected PubChem confirmatory BioAssays, and ChEMBL entries for which a well defined protein target ("TARGET_TYPE='PROTEIN'") is provided. Data extracted by BindingDB typically includes more details regarding experimental conditions, etc
The GHDx is our user-friendly and searchable data catalog for global health, demographic, and other health-related datasets. It provides detailed information about datasets ranging from censuses and surveys to health records and vital statistics, globally. It also serves as a platform for data owners to share their data with the public. The GDB Compare visualization, which allows the user to see rate of change in disease incidence, globally or by country, by age or across all ages, is especially powerful as a tool. Be sure to try adding a bottom chart, like the map, to augment the treemap that loads by default in the top chart.
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It captures and catalogues ancient human genome and microbiome data, including raw sequence and processed data, along with metadata about its provenance and production. Included datasets are generated from ancient samples studied at the Australian Centre for Ancient DNA, University of Adelaide in collaboration with other research groups. Datasets and collections in OAGR are open data resources made freely available in a reusable form, using open file formats and licensed with minimal restrictions for reuse. Digital object identifiers (DOIs) are minted for included datasets and collections to facilitate persistent identification and citation.
Neotoma is a multiproxy paleoecological database that covers the Pliocene-Quaternary, including modern microfossil samples. The database is an international collaborative effort among individuals from 19 institutions, representing multiple constituent databases. There are over 20 data-types within the Neotoma Paleoecological Database, including pollen microfossils, plant macrofossils, vertebrate fauna, diatoms, charcoal, biomarkers, ostracodes, physical sedimentology and water chemistry. Neotoma provides an underlying cyberinfrastructure that enables the development of common software tools for data ingest, discovery, display, analysis, and distribution, while giving domain scientists control over critical taxonomic and other data quality issues.
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All observations obtained with the Parkes radio telescope are made available to the general community after an embargo period. Usually this embargo period is set to 18 months after the observation. The catalogue includes all published rotation-powered pulsars, including those detected only at high energies. It also includes Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs) and Soft Gamma-ray Repeaters (SGRs) for which coherent pulsations have been detected. However, it excludes accretion-powered pulsars such as Her X-1 and the recently discovered X-ray millisecond pulsars. ATNF Pulsar catalogue contains information on all published pulsars, with complete bibliographic information. For professional astronomers, a more detailed "Expert" web interface is available allowing access to parameters of specialist interest. The catalogue can also be accessed using a command-line interface on unix or linux systems.
The Data and Service Center for the Humanities (DaSCH) is an institution of the Swiss Academy of Humanities and Social Sciences (SAHSS) financed by the State Secretariat for Eduction, Research and Innovation (SERI). The primary goals of the DaSCH are - Preservation of research data in the humanities and their long-term data curation. - Ensuring permanent access to research data in order to make it available for further research and thus facilitating the reuse of existing research data in future research. - Providing services for researchers to assist them with the data management plan. - Encouraging the digital networking of databases created in Switzerland or in other countries. - Collaboration and networking with other institutions on digital literacy. The services of the DaSCH are available to all researchers and projects in Switzerland which work in the the domain of the Humanities and have to deal with digital information as well to other research institutions in Switzerland.
Monash.figshare is Monash University’s institutional data repository. It allows researchers to store, manage and showcase their data while retaining control over access rights and re-use conditions. Monash.figshare offers the latest in cloud-based technology, ensures valuable research data is stored securely, and supports long-term citations with Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs).
The Spiral Digital Repository is the Imperial College London institutional open access repository. This system allows you, as an author, to make your research documents open access without incurring additional publication costs. When you self-archive a research document in Spiral it becomes free for anyone to read. You can upload copies of your publications to Spiral using Symplectic Elements. All deposited content becomes searchable online.
nmrshiftdb is a NMR database (web database) for organic structures and their nuclear magnetic resonance (nmr) spectra. It allows for spectrum prediction (13C, 1H and other nuclei) as well as for searching spectra, structures and other properties. Last not least, it features peer-reviewed submission of datasets by its users. The nmrshiftdb2 software is open source, the data is published under an open content license. Please consult the documentation for more detailed information. nmrshiftdb2 is the continuation of the NMRShiftDB project with additional data and bugfixes and changes in the software.
CaltechDATA is an institutional data repository for Caltech. Caltech library runs the repository to preserve the accomplishments of Caltech researchers and share their results with the world. Caltech-associated researchers can upload data, link data with their publications, and assign a permanent DOI so that others can reference the data set. The repository also preserves software and has automatic Github integration. All files present in the repository are open access or embargoed, and all metadata is always available to the public.
The figshare service for the University of Sheffield allows researchers to store, share and publish research data. It helps the research data to be accessible by storing Metadata alongside datasets. Additionally, every uploaded item receives a Digital Object identifier (DOI), which allows the data to be citable and sustainable. If there are any ethical or copyright concerns about publishing a certain dataset, it is possible to publish the metadata associated with the dataset to help discoverability while sharing the data itself via a private channel through manual approval.
The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) improves research capacity in the Earth and Ocean sciences by maintaining an open community digital data archive for rock magnetic, geomagnetic, archeomagnetic (archaeomagnetic) and paleomagnetic (palaeomagnetic) data. Different parts of the website allow users access to archive, search, visualize, and download these data. MagIC supports the international rock magnetism, geomagnetism, archeomagnetism (archaeomagnetism), and paleomagnetism (palaeomagnetism) research and endeavors to bring data out of private archives, making them accessible to all and (re-)useable for new, creative, collaborative scientific and educational activities. The data in MagIC is used for many types of studies including tectonic plate reconstructions, geomagnetic field models, paleomagnetic field reversal studies, magnetohydrodynamical studies of the Earth's core, magnetostratigraphy, and archeology. MagIC is a domain-specific data repository and directed by PIs who are both producers and consumers of rock, geo, and paleomagnetic data. Funded by NSF since 2003, MagIC forms a major part of https://earthref.org which integrates four independent cyber-initiatives rooted in various parts of the Earth, Ocean and Life sciences and education.
The UC San Diego Library Digital Collections website gathers two categories of content managed by the Library: library collections (including digitized versions of selected collections covering topics such as art, film, music, history and anthropology) and research data collections (including research data generated by UC San Diego researchers).
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The repository was esteblished to host, organize, and share materials data. It contains ab initio electronic-structure data from density-functional theory and methods beyond.
VIPERdb is a database for icosahedral virus capsid structures . The emphasis of the resource is on providing data from structural and computational analyses on these systems, as well as high quality renderings for visual exploration. In addition, all virus capsids are placed in a single icosahedral orientation convention, facilitating comparison between different structures. The web site includes powerful search utilities , links to other relevant databases, background information on virus capsid structure, and useful database interface tools.
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MIDAS is national research data archive. The aim of the MIDAS is to collect, process, store and analyse scientific research data and other relevant information in all fields of knowledge, enabling free, easy and convenient access to it via the Internet. MIDAS provides services for registered and not-registered users: students, listeners, academics, researchers, scientific workers, research data evaluation and quality assurance experts, other participants in a science and studies system as well as individuals interested in research data. MIDAS consists of 2 parts: MIDAS portal (all users) and user account (internal portal for registered users).The Vilnius University is controller and main processor of MIDAS system.
ETH Data Archive is ETH Zurich's long-term preservation solution for digital information such as research data, documents or images. It serves as the backbone of data curation and for most of its content, it is a “dark archive” without public access. In this capacity, the ETH Data Archive also archives the content of ETH Zurich’s Research Collection which is the primary repository for members of the university and the first point of contact for publication of data at ETH Zurich. All data that was produced in the context of research at the ETH Zurich, can be published and archived in the Research Collection. In the following cases, a direct data upload into the ETH Data Archive though, has to be considered: - Upload and registration of software code according to ETH transfer’s requirements for Software Disclosure. - A substantial number of files, have to be regularly submitted for long-term archiving and/or publishing and browser-based upload is not an option: the ETH Data Archive may offer automated data and metadata transfers from source applications (e.g. from a LIMS) via API. - Files for a project on a local computer have to be collected and metadata has to be added before uploading the data to the ETH Data Archive: -- we provide you with the local file editor docuteam packer. Docuteam packer allows to structure, describe, and organise data for an upload into the ETH Data Archive and the depositor decides when submission is due.
The figshare service for The Open University was launched in 2016 and allows researchers to store, share and publish research data. It helps the research data to be accessible by storing metadata alongside datasets. Additionally, every uploaded item receives a Digital Object Identifier (DOI), which allows the data to be citable and sustainable. If there are any ethical or copyright concerns about publishing a certain dataset, it is possible to publish the metadata associated with the dataset to help discoverability while sharing the data itself via a private channel through manual approval.
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Figshare has been chosen as the University of Adelaide's official data and digital object repository with unlimited local storage. All current staff and HDR students can access and publish research data and digital objects on the University of Adelaide's Figshare site. Because Figshare is cloud-based, you can access it anywhere and at any time.
The European Space Agency's (ESA) X-ray Multi-Mirror Mission (XMM-Newton) was launched by an Ariane 504 on December 10th 1999. XMM-Newton is ESA's second cornerstone of the Horizon 2000 Science Programme. It carries 3 high throughput X-ray telescopes with an unprecedented effective area, and an optical monitor, the first flown on a X-ray observatory. The large collecting area and ability to make long uninterrupted exposures provide highly sensitive observations.