Filter
Reset all

Subjects

Content Types

Countries

AID systems

API

Certificates

Data access

Data access restrictions

Database access

Database access restrictions

Database licenses

Data licenses

Data upload

Data upload restrictions

Enhanced publication

Institution responsibility type

Institution type

Keywords

Metadata standards

PID systems

Provider types

Quality management

Repository languages

Software

Syndications

Repository types

Versioning

  • * at the end of a keyword allows wildcard searches
  • " quotes can be used for searching phrases
  • + represents an AND search (default)
  • | represents an OR search
  • - represents a NOT operation
  • ( and ) implies priority
  • ~N after a word specifies the desired edit distance (fuzziness)
  • ~N after a phrase specifies the desired slop amount
Found 38 result(s)
WorldClim is a set of global climate layers (climate grids) with a spatial resolution of about 1 square kilometer. The data can be used for mapping and spatial modeling in a GIS or with other computer programs.
Country
The UWA Research Repository contains research publications, research datasets and theses created by researchers and postgraduates affiliated with UWA. It is managed by the University Library and provides access to research datasets held at the University of Western Australia. The information about each dataset has been provided by UWA research groups. Dataset metadata is harvested into Research Data Australia (RDA: https://researchdata.ands.org.au/). Language: The user interface language of the research data repository.
Country
The Ningaloo Atlas was created in response to the need for more comprehensive and accessible information on environmental and socio-economic data on the greater Ningaloo region. As such, the Ningaloo Atlas is a web portal to not only access and share information, but to celebrate and promote the biodiversity, heritage, value, and way of life of the greater Ningaloo region.
Country
The World Data Centre section provides software and data catalogue information and data produced by IPS Radio and Space Services over the past few past decades. You can download data files, plot graphs from data files, check data availability, retrieve data sets and station information.
Monash.figshare is Monash University’s institutional data repository. It allows researchers to store, manage and showcase their data while retaining control over access rights and re-use conditions. Monash.figshare offers the latest in cloud-based technology, ensures valuable research data is stored securely, and supports long-term citations with Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs).
The International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) is an international marine research collaboration that explores Earth's history and dynamics using ocean-going research platforms to recover data recorded in seafloor sediments and rocks and to monitor subseafloor environments. IODP depends on facilities funded by three platform providers with financial contributions from five additional partner agencies. Together, these entities represent 26 nations whose scientists are selected to staff IODP research expeditions conducted throughout the world's oceans. IODP expeditions are developed from hypothesis-driven science proposals aligned with the program's science plan Illuminating Earth's Past, Present, and Future. The science plan identifies 14 challenge questions in the four areas of climate change, deep life, planetary dynamics, and geohazards. Until 2013 under the name: International Ocean Drilling Program.
Country
At 2016-05-29 sees the official merger of the IMOS eMarine Information Infrastructure (eMII) Facility and the Australian Ocean Data Network (AODN) into a single entity. The marine information Facility of IMOS is now the AODN. Enabling open access to marine data is core business for IMOS. The IMOS data will continue to be discoverable alongside a wider collection of Australian marine and climate data via the new-look AODN Portal. Visit the AODN Portal at https://portal.aodn.org.au/. - IMOS is designed to be a fully-integrated, national system, observing at ocean-basin and regional scales, and covering physical, chemical and biological variables. IMOS observations are guided by science planning undertaken collaboratively across the Nodes of the Australian marine and climate science community with input from government, industry and other stakeholders. There are five major research themes that unify IMOS science plans and related observations: Long-term ocean change, Climate variability and weather extremes, Boundary currents, Continental shelf and coastal processes, and Ecosystem responses. The observations and data streams are collected via ten technology platforms, or Facilities.
Country
MyTardis began at Monash University to solve the problem of users needing to store large datasets and share them with collaborators online. Its particular focus is on integration with scientific instruments, instrument facilities and research lab file storage. Our belief is that the less effort a researcher has to expend safely storing data, the more likely they are to do so. This approach has flourished with MyTardis capturing data from areas such as protein crystallography, electron microscopy, medical imaging and proteomics and with deployments at Australian institutions such as University of Queensland, RMIT, University of Sydney and the Australian Synchrotron. Data access via https://www.massive.org.au/ and https://store.erc.monash.edu.au/experiment/view/104/ and see 'remarks'.
Country
Australian Ocean Data Network (AODN) provides data collected by the Australian marine community. AODN's data is searchable via map interface and metadata catalogue. AODN is Australia's exhaustive repository for marine and climate data. AODN has merged with IMOS eMarine Information Infrastructure (eMII) Facility in May 2016. IMOS is a multi-institutional collaboration with a focus on open data access. It is ideally placed to manage the AODN on behalf of the Australian marine and climate community.
The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is a radio telescope with around one million square metres of collecting area, designed to study the Universe with unprecedented speed and sensitivity. The SKA is not a single telescope, but a collection of various types of antennas, called an array, to be spread over long distances. The SKA will be used to answer fundamental questions of science and about the laws of nature, such as: how did the Universe, and the stars and galaxies contained in it, form and evolve? Was Einstein’s theory of relativity correct? What is the nature of ‘dark matter’ and ‘dark energy’? What is the origin of cosmic magnetism? Is there life somewhere else in the Universe?
The Paleobiology Database (PaleoBioDB) is a non-governmental, non-profit public resource for paleontological data. It has been organized and operated by a multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional, international group of paleobiological researchers. Its purpose is to provide global, collection-based occurrence and taxonomic data for organisms of all geological ages, as well data services to allow easy access to data for independent development of analytical tools, visualization software, and applications of all types. The Database’s broader goal is to encourage and enable data-driven collaborative efforts that address large-scale paleobiological questions.
Country
In a changing climate, water raises increasingly complex challenges: concerning its quantity, quality, availability, allocation, use and significance as a habitat, resource and cultural medium. Dharmae, a ‘Data Hub of Australian Research on Marine and Aquatic Ecocultures’ brings together multi-disciplinary research data relating to water in all these forms. The term “ecoculture” guides the development of this collection and its approach to data discovery. Ecoculture recognizes that, since nature and culture are inextricably linked, there is a corresponding need for greater interconnectedness of the different knowledge systems applied to them.
TemperateReefBase is a resource for temperate reef researchers worldwide to use and contribute data. Unique in its role as a one-stop-shop for global temperate reef data, TemperateReefBase was initially established by IMAS in collaboration with the Kelp Ecology Ecosystem Network (KEEN). KEEN was instigated through a National Centre for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) working group which assembled experts from around the world to examine the impacts of global change on kelp-bed ecosystem worldwide. The group has assembled significant global data for kelps, other seaweeds and associated species including fishes, and has embarked on unprecedented global experiments and surveys in which identical experiments and surveys are being conducted at sites in kelp beds around the world to determine global trends and examine the capacity of kelps to respond to disturbance in the face of climate change and other anthropogenic stressors. The TemperateReefBase Data Portal is an online discovery interface showcasing temperate reef data collected from around the globe. The portal aims to make this data freely and openly available for the benefit of marine and environmental science as a whole. The TemperateReefBase Data Portal is hosted and maintained by the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies at the University of Tasmania, Australia.
Country
This guide aims to provide a starting point to locating Geographic Information System (GIS) information both through the University of Sydney library catalogue and on the World Wide Web.
The Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network (TERN) allows ecosystem scientists to integrate data across disciplines. Data topics include plants and animals, vegetation, terrestrial ecosystem, ecological dynamics, fresh water and estuarine, land surface and soils, agriculture, oceans and coasts, climate, human-nature interactions, and energy, water and gas.
The Australian National University undertake work to collect and publish metadata about research data held by ANU, and in the case of four discipline areas, Earth Sciences, Astronomy, Phenomics and Digital Humanities to develop pipelines and tools to enable the publication of research data using a common and repeatable approach. Aims and outcomes: To identify and describe research data held at ANU, to develop a consistent approach to the publication of metadata on the University's data holdings: Identification and curation of significant orphan data sets that might otherwise be lost or inadvertently destroyed, to develop a culture of data data sharing and data re-use.
Country
The Atlas of Living Australia (ALA) combines and provides scientifically collected data from a wide range of sources such as museums, herbaria, community groups, government departments, individuals and universities. Data records consist of images, literature, molecular DNA data, identification keys, species interaction data, species profile data, nomenclature, source data, conservation indicators, and spatial data.
Country
EarthByte is an internationally leading eGeoscience collaboration between several Australian Universities, international centres of excellence and industry partners. One of the fundamental aims of the EarthByte Group is geodata synthesis through space and time, assimilating the wealth of disparate geological and geophysical data into a four-dimensional Earth model including tectonics, geodynamics and surface processes. The EarthByte Group is pursuing open innovation via collaborative software development, high performance and distributed computing, “big data” analysis and by making open access digital data collections available to the community.
Country
TERN's AEKOS data portal is the original gateway to Australian ecology data. It is a ‘data and research methods’ data portal for Australia’s land-dwelling plants, animals and their environments. The primary focus of data content is raw co-located ‘species and environment’ ecological survey data that has been collected at the ‘plot’ level to describe biodiversity, its patterns and ecological processes. It is openly accessible with standard discovery metadata and user-oriented, contextual metadata critical for data reuse. Our services support the ecosystem science community, land managers and governments seeking to publish under COPE publishing ethics and the FAIR data publishing principles. AEKOS is registered with Thomson & Reuters Data Citation Index and is a recommended repository of Nature Publishing’s Scientific Data. There are currently 97,037 sites covering mostly plant biodiversity and co-located environmental data of Australia. The AEKOS initiative is supported by TERN (tern.org.au), hosted by The University of Adelaide and funded by the Australian Government’s National Research Infrastructure for Australia.