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Found 15 result(s)
BindingDB is a public, web-accessible database of measured binding affinities, focusing chiefly on the interactions of proteins considered to be candidate drug-targets with ligands that are small, drug-like molecules. BindingDB supports medicinal chemistry and drug discovery via literature awareness and development of structure-activity relations (SAR and QSAR); validation of computational chemistry and molecular modeling approaches such as docking, scoring and free energy methods; chemical biology and chemical genomics; and basic studies of the physical chemistry of molecular recognition. BindingDB also includes a small collection of host-guest binding data of interest to chemists studying supramolecular systems. The data collection derives from a variety of measurement techniques, including enzyme inhibition and kinetics, isothermal titration calorimetry, NMR, and radioligand and competition assays. BindingDB includes data extracted from the literature by the BindingDB project, selected PubChem confirmatory BioAssays, and ChEMBL entries for which a well defined protein target ("TARGET_TYPE='PROTEIN'") is provided. Data extracted by BindingDB typically includes more details regarding experimental conditions, etc
---<<< This repository is no longer available. This record is out-dated >>>--- The ONS challenge contains open solubility data, experiments with raw data from different scientists and institutions. It is part of the The Open Notebook Science wiki community, ideally suited for community-wide collaborative research projects involving mathematical modeling and computer simulation work, as it allows researchers to document model development in a step-by-step fashion, then link model prediction to experiments that test the model, and in turn, use feeback from experiments to evolve the model. By making our laboratory notebooks public, the evolutionary process of a model can be followed in its totality by the interested reader. Researchers from laboratories around the world can now follow the progress of our research day-to-day, borrow models at various stages of development, comment or advice on model developments, discuss experiments, ask questions, provide feedback, or otherwise contribute to the progress of science in any manner possible.
The ZINC Database contains commercially available compounds for structure based virtual screening. It currently has about 21 million compounds that can simply be purchased. It is provided in ready-to-dock, 3D formats with molecules represented in biologically relevant forms. It is available in subsets for general screening as well as target-, chemotype- and vendor-focused subsets. ZINC is free for everyone to use and download at the website zinc.docking.org.
The Reciprocal Net is a distributed database used by research crystallographers to store information about molecular structures; much of the data is available to the general public. The Reciprocal Net project is still under development. Currently, there are 18 participating crystallography laboratories online. The project is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and part of the National Science Digital Library. The contents of this collection will come principally from structures contributed by participating crystallography laboratories, thus providing a means for teachers, students, and the general public to connect better with current chemistry research. The Reciprocal Net's emphasis is on obtaining structures of general interest and usefulness to those several classes of digital library users.
AMCSD is an interface to a crystal structure database that includes every structure published in the American Mineralogist, The Canadian Mineralogist, European Journal of Mineralogy and Physics and Chemistry of Minerals, as well as selected datasets from other journals. The database is maintained under the care of the Mineralogical Society of America and the Mineralogical Association of Canada, and financed by the National Science Foundation. You may search by a mineral of your choice, or choose a mineral from a complete list to help aid your research.
Established in 1965, the CSD is the world’s repository for small-molecule organic and metal-organic crystal structures. Containing the results of over one million x-ray and neutron diffraction analyses this unique database of accurate 3D structures has become an essential resource to scientists around the world. The CSD records bibliographic, chemical and crystallographic information for:organic molecules, metal-organic compounds whose 3D structures have been determined using X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction. The CSD records results of: single crystal studies, powder diffraction studies which yield 3D atomic coordinate data for at least all non-H atoms. In some cases the CCDC is unable to obtain coordinates, and incomplete entries are archived to the CSD. The CSD includes crystal structure data arising from: publications in the open literature and Private Communications to the CSD (via direct data deposition). The CSD contains directly deposited data that are not available anywhere else, known as CSD Communications.
PDBj (Protein Data Bank Japan) provides a centralized PDB archive of macromolecular structures, integrated tools for data retrieval, visualization, and functional characterization. PDBj is supported by JST-NBDC and Osaka University.
The Protein Data Bank (PDB) is an archive of experimentally determined three-dimensional structures of biological macromolecules that serves a global community of researchers, educators, and students. The data contained in the archive include atomic coordinates, crystallographic structure factors and NMR experimental data. Aside from coordinates, each deposition also includes the names of molecules, primary and secondary structure information, sequence database references, where appropriate, and ligand and biological assembly information, details about data collection and structure solution, and bibliographic citations. The Worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB) consists of organizations that act as deposition, data processing and distribution centers for PDB data. Members are: RCSB PDB (USA), PDBe (Europe) and PDBj (Japan), and BMRB (USA). The wwPDB's mission is to maintain a single PDB archive of macromolecular structural data that is freely and publicly available to the global community.
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The SABIO-RK is a web-based application based on the SABIO relational database that contains information about biochemical reactions, their kinetic equations with their parameters, and the experimental conditions under which these parameters were measured. It aims to support modellers in the setting-up of models of biochemical networks, but it is also useful for experimentalists or researchers with interest in biochemical reactions and their kinetics. All the data are manually curated and annotated by biological experts, supported by automated consistency checks.
Rhea is a freely available and comprehensive resource of expert-curated biochemical reactions. It has been designed to provide a non-redundant set of chemical transformations for applications such as the functional annotation of enzymes, pathway inference and metabolic network reconstruction. There are three types of reaction participants (reactants and products): Small molecules, Rhea polymers, Generic compounds. All three types of reaction participants are linked to the ChEBI database (Chemical Entities of Biological Interest) which provides detailed information about structure, formula and charge. Rhea provides built-in validations that ensure both mass and charge balance of the reactions. We have populated the database with the reactions found in the enzyme classification (i.e. in the IntEnz and ENZYME databases), extending it with additional known reactions of biological interest. While the main focus of Rhea is enzyme-catalysed reactions, other biochemical reactions (including those that are often termed "spontaneous") also are included.
>>>!!!<<< Ecological Archives through the end of 2015 will be hosted on FigShare once the transition to publishing with Wiley is completed. Thereafter, supplemental material may be hosted on Wiley Online, and/or data deposited with FigShare, Dryad, and other repositories. >>>!!!<<< Ecological Archives publishes materials that are supplemental to articles that appear in the ESA journals (Ecology, Ecological Applications, Ecological Monographs, Ecosphere, Ecosystem Health and Sustainability and Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America), as well as peer-reviewed data papers with abstracts published in the printed journals. Three kinds of publications appear in Ecological Archives: appendices, supplements, and data papers.
The Yeast Resource Center provides access to data about mass spectrometry, yeast two-hybrid arrays, deconvolution florescence microscopy, protein structure prediction and computational biology. These services are provided to further the goal of a complete understanding of the chemical interactions required for the maintenance and faithful reproduction of a living cell. The observation that the fundamental biological processes of yeast are conserved among all eukaryotes ensures that this knowledge will shape and advance our understanding of living systems.
The World Wide Molecular Matrix (WWMM) is an electronic repository for unpublished chemical data. WWMM is an open collection of information of small molecules. The "Matrix" in WWMM is influenced by William Gibson's vision of a cyberinfrastructure where all knowledge is accessible. The WWMM is an experiment to see how far this can be taken for chemical compounds. Although much of the information for a given compound has been Openly published, very little is available in Open electronic collections. The WWMM is aimed at catalysing this approach for chemistry and the current collection is made available under the Budapest Open Archive Initiative (http://www.budapestopenaccessinitiative.org/read).