Filter
Reset all

Subjects

Content Types

Countries

AID systems

API

Certificates

Data access

Data access restrictions

Database access

Database access restrictions

Database licenses

Data licenses

Data upload

Data upload restrictions

Enhanced publication

Institution responsibility type

Institution type

Keywords

Metadata standards

PID systems

Provider types

Quality management

Repository languages

Software

Syndications

Repository types

Versioning

  • * at the end of a keyword allows wildcard searches
  • " quotes can be used for searching phrases
  • + represents an AND search (default)
  • | represents an OR search
  • - represents a NOT operation
  • ( and ) implies priority
  • ~N after a word specifies the desired edit distance (fuzziness)
  • ~N after a phrase specifies the desired slop amount
Found 34 result(s)
The 1000 Genomes Project is an international collaboration to produce an extensive public catalog of human genetic variation, including SNPs and structural variants, and their haplotype contexts. This resource will support genome-wide association studies and other medical research studies. The genomes of about 2500 unidentified people from about 25 populations around the world will be sequenced using next-generation sequencing technologies. The results of the study will be freely and publicly accessible to researchers worldwide. The International Genome Sample Resource (IGSR) has been established at EMBL-EBI to continue supporting data generated by the 1000 Genomes Project, supplemented with new data and new analysis.
The Allele Frequency Net Database (AFND) is a public database which contains frequency information of several immune genes such as Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA), Killer-cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors (KIR), Major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related (MIC) genes, and a number of cytokine gene polymorphisms. The Allele Frequency Net Database (AFND) provides a central source, freely available to all, for the storage of allele frequencies from different polymorphic areas in the Human Genome. Users can contribute the results of their work into one common database and can perform database searches on information already available. We have currently collected data in allele, haplotype and genotype format. However, the success of this website will depend on you to contribute your data.
ArrayExpress is one of the major international repositories for high-throughput functional genomics data from both microarray and high-throughput sequencing studies, many of which are supported by peer-reviewed publications. Data sets are submitted directly to ArrayExpress and curated by a team of specialist biological curators. In the past (until 2018) datasets from the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus database were imported on a weekly basis. Data is collected to MIAME and MINSEQE standards.
The Ensembl project produces genome databases for vertebrates and other eukaryotic species. Ensembl is a joint project between the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (WTSI) to develop a software system that produces and maintains automatic annotation on selected genomes.The Ensembl project was started in 1999, some years before the draft human genome was completed. Even at that early stage it was clear that manual annotation of 3 billion base pairs of sequence would not be able to offer researchers timely access to the latest data. The goal of Ensembl was therefore to automatically annotate the genome, integrate this annotation with other available biological data and make all this publicly available via the web. Since the website's launch in July 2000, many more genomes have been added to Ensembl and the range of available data has also expanded to include comparative genomics, variation and regulatory data. Ensembl is a joint project between European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI), an outstation of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (WTSI). Both institutes are located on the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus in Hinxton, south of the city of Cambridge, United Kingdom.
This site provides access to complete, annotated genomes from bacteria and archaea (present in the European Nucleotide Archive) through the Ensembl graphical user interface (genome browser). Ensembl Bacteria contains genomes from annotated INSDC records that are loaded into Ensembl multi-species databases, using the INSDC annotation import pipeline.
The Ensembl genome annotation system, developed jointly by the EBI and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, has been used for the annotation, analysis and display of vertebrate genomes since 2000. Since 2009, the Ensembl site has been complemented by the creation of five new sites, for bacteria, protists, fungi, plants and invertebrate metazoa, enabling users to use a single collection of (interactive and programatic) interfaces for accessing and comparing genome-scale data from species of scientific interest from across the taxonomy. In each domain, we aim to bring the integrative power of Ensembl tools for comparative analysis, data mining and visualisation across genomes of scientific interest, working in collaboration with scientific communities to improve and deepen genome annotation and interpretation.
The European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) captures and presents information relating to experimental workflows that are based around nucleotide sequencing. A typical workflow includes the isolation and preparation of material for sequencing, a run of a sequencing machine in which sequencing data are produced and a subsequent bioinformatic analysis pipeline. ENA records this information in a data model that covers input information (sample, experimental setup, machine configuration), output machine data (sequence traces, reads and quality scores) and interpreted information (assembly, mapping, functional annotation). Data arrive at ENA from a variety of sources. These include submissions of raw data, assembled sequences and annotation from small-scale sequencing efforts, data provision from the major European sequencing centres and routine and comprehensive exchange with our partners in the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC). Provision of nucleotide sequence data to ENA or its INSDC partners has become a central and mandatory step in the dissemination of research findings to the scientific community. ENA works with publishers of scientific literature and funding bodies to ensure compliance with these principles and to provide optimal submission systems and data access tools that work seamlessly with the published literature.
The European Social Survey (the ESS) is a biennial multi-country survey covering over 30 nations. The first round was fielded in 2002/2003, the fifth in 2010/2011. The questionnaire includes two main sections, each consisting of approximately 120 items; a 'core' module which remains relatively constant from round to round, plus two or more 'rotating' modules, repeated at intervals. The core module aims to monitor change and continuity in a wide range of social variables, including media use; social and public trust; political interest and participation; socio-political orientations; governance and efficacy; moral; political and social values; social exclusion, national, ethnic and religious allegiances; well-being; health and security; human values; demographics and socio-economics
The EZRC at KIT houses the largest experimental fish facility in Europe with a capacity of more than 300,000 fish. Zebrafish stocks are maintained mostly as frozen sperm. Frequently requested lines are also kept alive as well as a selection of wildtype strains. Several thousand mutations in protein coding genes generated by TILLING in the Stemple lab of the Sanger Centre, Hinxton, UK and lines generated by ENU mutagenesis by the Nüsslein-Volhard lab in addition to transgenic lines and mutants generated by KIT groups or brought in through collaborations. We also accept submissions on an individual basis and ship fish upon request to PIs in Europe and elsewhere. EZRC also provides screening services and technologies such as imaging and high-throughput sequencing. Key areas include automation of embryo handling and automated image acquisition and processing. Our platform also involves the development of novel microscopy techniques (e.g. SPIM, DSLM, robotic macroscope) to permit high-resolution, real-time imaging in 4D. By association with the ComPlat platform, we can support also chemical screens and offer libraries with up to 20,000 compounds in total for external users. As another service to the community the EZRC provides plasmids (cDNAs, transgenes, Talen, Crispr/cas9) maintained by the Helmholtz repository of Bioparts (HERBI) to the scientific community. In addition the fish facility keeps a range of medaka stocks, maintained by the Loosli group.
The Expression Atlas provides information on gene expression patterns under different biological conditions such as a gene knock out, a plant treated with a compound, or in a particular organism part or cell. It includes both microarray and RNA-seq data. The data is re-analysed in-house to detect interesting expression patterns under the conditions of the original experiment. There are two components to the Expression Atlas, the Baseline Atlas and the Differential Atlas. The Baseline Atlas displays information about which gene products are present (and at what abundance) in "normal" conditions (e.g. tissue, cell type). It aims to answer questions such as "which genes are specifically expressed in human kidney?". This component of the Expression Atlas consists of highly-curated and quality-checked RNA-seq experiments from ArrayExpress. It has data for many different animal and plant species. New experiments are added as they become available. The Differential Atlas allows users to identify genes that are up- or down-regulated in a wide variety of different experimental conditions such as yeast mutants, cadmium treated plants, cystic fibrosis or the effect on gene expression of mind-body practice. Both microarray and RNA-seq experiments are included in the Differential Atlas. Experiments are selected from ArrayExpress and groups of samples are manually identified for comparison e.g. those with wild type genotype compared to those with a gene knock out. Each experiment is processed through our in-house differential expression statistical analysis pipeline to identify genes with a high probability of differential expression.
The FAIRDOMHub is built upon the SEEK software suite, which is an open source web platform for sharing scientific research assets, processes and outcomes. FAIRDOM (Web Site) will establish a support and service network for European Systems Biology. It will serve projects in standardizing, managing and disseminating data and models in a FAIR manner: Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable. FAIRDOM is an initiative to develop a community, and establish an internationally sustained Data and Model Management service to the European Systems Biology community. FAIRDOM is a joint action of ERA-Net EraSysAPP and European Research Infrastructure ISBE.
The DNA Bank Network was established in spring 2007 and was funded until 2011 by the German Research Foundation (DFG). The network was initiated by GBIF Germany (Global Biodiversity Information Facility). It offers a worldwide unique concept. DNA bank databases of all partners are linked and are accessible via a central web portal, providing DNA samples of complementary collections (microorganisms, protists, plants, algae, fungi and animals). The DNA Bank Network was one of the founders of the Global Genome Biodiversity Network (GGBN) and is fully merged with GGBN today. GGBN agreed on using the data model proposed by the DNA Bank Network. The Botanic Garden and Botanical Museum Berlin-Dahlem (BGBM) hosts the technical secretariat of GGBN and its virtual infrastructure. The main focus of the DNA Bank Network is to enhance taxonomic, systematic, genetic, conservation and evolutionary studies by providing: • high quality, long-term storage of DNA material on which molecular studies have been performed, so that results can be verified, extended, and complemented, • complete on-line documentation of each sample, including the provenance of the original material, the place of voucher deposit, information about DNA quality and extraction methodology, digital images of vouchers and links to published molecular data if available.
GWAS Central (previously the Human Genome Variation database of Genotype-to-Phenotype information) is a database of summary level findings from genetic association studies, both large and small. We actively gather datasets from public domain projects, and encourage direct data submission from the community.
IntEnz contains the recommendation of the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology on the nomenclature and classification of enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Users can browse by enzyme classification or use advanced search options to search enzymes by class, subclass and sub-subclass information.
M-CSA is a database of enzyme reaction mechanisms. It provides annotation on the protein, catalytic residues, cofactors, and the reaction mechanisms of hundreds of enzymes. There are two kinds of entries in M-CSA. 'Detailed mechanism' entries are more complete and show the individual chemical steps of the mechanism as schemes with electron flow arrows. 'Catalytic Site' entries annotate the catalytic residues necessary for the reaction, but do not show the mechanism. The M-CSA (Mechanism and Catalytic Site Atlas) represents a unified resource that combines the data in both MACiE and the CSA
The Ontology Lookup Service (OLS) is a repository for biomedical ontologies that aims to provide a single point of access to the latest ontology versions. The user can browse the ontologies through the website as well as programmatically via the OLS API. The OLS provides a web service interface to query multiple ontologies from a single location with a unified output format.The OLS can integrate any ontology available in the Open Biomedical Ontology (OBO) format. The OLS is an open source project hosted on Google Code.
The Open PHACTS project will develop an open source, open standards and open access innovation platform, Open Pharmacological Space (OPS), via a semantic web approach. OPS will comprise data, vocabularies and infrastructure needed to accelerate drugoriented research. This semantic integration hub will address key bottlenecks in small molecule drug discovery: disparate information sources, lack of standards and shared concept identifiers, guided by well defined research questions assembled from participating drug discovery teams. Open PHACTS draws together multiple sources of publicly-available pharmacological and physicochemical data, accessible via the Open PHACTS Explorer, an intuitive interface, and the powerful Open PHACTS API.
PhytoPath is a new bioinformatics resource that integrates genome-scale data from important plant pathogen species with literature-curated information about the phenotypes of host infection. Using the Ensembl Genomes browser, it provides access to complete genome assembly and gene models of priority crop and model-fungal, oomycete and bacterial phytopathogens. PhytoPath also links genes to disease progression using data from the curated PHI-base resource. PhytoPath portal is a joint project bringing together Ensembl Genomes with PHI-base, a community-curated resource describing the role of genes in pathogenic infection. PhytoPath provides access to genomic and phentoypic data from fungal and oomycete plant pathogens, and has enabled a considerable increase in the coverage of phytopathogen genomes in Ensembl Fungi and Ensembl Protists. PhytoPath also provides enhanced searching of the PHI-base resource as well as the fungi and protists in Ensembl Genomes.
PDBe is the European resource for the collection, organisation and dissemination of data on biological macromolecular structures. In collaboration with the other worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB) partners - the Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics (RCSB) and BioMagResBank (BMRB) in the USA and the Protein Data Bank of Japan (PDBj) - we work to collate, maintain and provide access to the global repository of macromolecular structure data. We develop tools, services and resources to make structure-related data more accessible to the biomedical community.