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Found 47 result(s)
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Research Data Australia is the data discovery service of the Australian National Data Service (ANDS). We do not store the data itself here but provide descriptions of, and links to, the data from our data publishing partners. ANDS is funded by the Australian Government through the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy (NCRIS).
Stanford Network Analysis Platform (SNAP) is a general purpose network analysis and graph mining library. It is written in C++ and easily scales to massive networks with hundreds of millions of nodes, and billions of edges. It efficiently manipulates large graphs, calculates structural properties, generates regular and random graphs, and supports attributes on nodes and edges. SNAP is also available through the NodeXL which is a graphical front-end that integrates network analysis into Microsoft Office and Excel. The SNAP library is being actively developed since 2004 and is organically growing as a result of our research pursuits in analysis of large social and information networks. Largest network we analyzed so far using the library was the Microsoft Instant Messenger network from 2006 with 240 million nodes and 1.3 billion edges. The datasets available on the website were mostly collected (scraped) for the purposes of our research. The website was launched in July 2009.
CRAWDAD is the Community Resource for Archiving Wireless Data, a wireless network data resource for the research community. This archive has the capacity to store wireless trace data from many contributing locations, and staff to develop better tools for collecting, anonymizing, and analyzing the data. We work with community leaders to ensure that the archive meets the needs of the research community.
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The BCDC serves the research data obtained, and the data syntheses assembled, by researchers within the Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research. Furthermore it is open for all interested scientists independent of institution. All data from the different disciplines (e.g. geology, oceanography, biology, model community) will be archived in a long-term repository, interconnected and made publicly available by the BCDC. BCDC has collaborations with many international data repositories and actively archives metadata and data at those ensuring quality and FAIRness. BCDC has it's main focus on services for data management for external and internal funded projects in the field of climate research, provides data management plans and ensures that data is archived accordingly according to the best practices in the field. The data management services rank from project work for small external funded project to top-of-the-art data management services for research infrastructures on the ESFRI roadmap (e.g. RI ICOS – Integrated Carbon Observation System) and for provides products and services for Copernicus Marine Environmental Monitoring Services. In addition BCDC is advising various communities on data management services e.g. IOC UNESCO, OECD, IAEA and various funding agencies. BCDC will become an Associated Data Unit (ADU) under IODE, International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange, a worldwide network that operates under the auspices of the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO and aims at becoming a part of ICSU World Data System.
Project Data Sphere, LLC, operates a free digital library-laboratory where the research community can broadly share, integrate and analyze historical, de-identified, patient-level data from academic and industry cancer Phase II-III clinical trials. These patient-level datasets are available through the Project Data Sphere platform to researchers affiliated with life science companies, hospitals and institutions, as well as independent researchers, at no cost and without requiring a research proposal.
The US Virtual Astronomical Observatory (VAO) is the VO effort based in the US, and it is one of many VO projects currently underway worldwide. The primary emphasis of the VAO is to provide new scientific research capabilities to the astronomy community. Thus an essential component of the VAO activity is obtaining input from US astronomers about the research tools that are most urgently needed in their work, and this information will guide the development efforts of the VAO. >>>!!!<<< Funding discontinued in 2014 and all software, documentation, and other digital assets developed under the VAO are stored in the VAO Project Repository https://sites.google.com/site/usvirtualobservatory/ . Code is archived on Github https://github.com/TomMcGlynn/usvirtualobservatory . >>>!!!<<<
The EUDAT project aims to contribute to the production of a Collaborative Data Infrastructure (CDI). The project´s target is to provide a pan-European solution to the challenge of data proliferation in Europe's scientific and research communities. The EUDAT vision is to support a Collaborative Data Infrastructure which will allow researchers to share data within and between communities and enable them to carry out their research effectively. EUDAT aims to provide a solution that will be affordable, trustworthy, robust, persistent and easy to use. EUDAT comprises 26 European partners, including data centres, technology providers, research communities and funding agencies from 13 countries. B2FIND is the EUDAT metadata service allowing users to discover what kind of data is stored through the B2SAFE and B2SHARE services which collect a large number of datasets from various disciplines. EUDAT will also harvest metadata from communities that have stable metadata providers to create a comprehensive joint catalogue to help researchers find interesting data objects and collections.
EDINA delivers online services and tools to benefit students, teachers and researchers in UK Higher and Further Education and beyond.
Merritt is a curation repository for the preservation of and access to the digital research data of the ten campus University of California system and external project collaborators. Merritt is supported by the University of California Curation Center (UC3) at the California Digital Library (CDL). While Merritt itself is content agnostic, accepting digital content regardless of domain, format, or structure, it is being used for management of research data, and it forms the basis for a number of domain-specific repositories, such as the ONEShare repository for earth and environmental science and the DataShare repository for life sciences. Merritt provides persistent identifiers, storage replication, fixity audit, complete version history, REST API, a comprehensive metadata catalog for discovery, ATOM-based syndication, and curatorially-defined collections, access control rules, and data use agreements (DUAs). Merritt content upload and download may each be curatorially-designated as public or restricted. Merritt DOIs are provided by UC3's EZID service, which is integrated with DataCite. All DOIs and associated metadata are automatically registered with DataCite and are harvested by Ex Libris PRIMO and Thomson Reuters Data Citation Index (DCI) for high-level discovery. Merritt is also a member node in the DataONE network; curatorially-designated data submitted to Merritt are automatically registered with DataONE for additional replication and federated discovery through the ONEMercury search/browse interface.
The Nuclear Data Portal is a new generation of nuclear data services using modern and powerful DELL servers, Sybase relational database software, the Linux operating system with programming in Java. The Portal includes nuclear structure, decay and reaction data, as well as literature information. Data can be searched for using optimized query forms; results are presented in tables and interactive plots. Additionally, a number of nuclear science tools, codes, applications, and links are provided. The databases includes are: CINDA - Computer Index of Nuclear Reaction Data, CSISRS alias EXFOR - Experimental nuclear reaction data, ENDF - Evaluated Nuclear Data File , ENSDF - Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File, MIRD - Medical Internal Radiation Dose, NSR - Nuclear Science References, NuDat - Nuclear Structure & Decay Data, XUNDL - Experimental Unevaluated Nuclear Data List, Chart of Nuclides. Nuclear Data Portal is a web service of National Nuclear Data Center.
The Rat Genome Database is a collaborative effort between leading research institutions involved in rat genetic and genomic research. Its goal, as stated in RFA: HL-99-013 is the establishment of a Rat Genome Database, to collect, consolidate, and integrate data generated from ongoing rat genetic and genomic research efforts and make these data widely available to the scientific community. A secondary, but critical goal is to provide curation of mapped positions for quantitative trait loci, known mutations and other phenotypic data.
The German Text Archive (Deutsches Textarchiv, DTA) presents online a selection of key German-language works in various disciplines from the 17th to 19th centuries. The electronic full-texts are indexed linguistically and the search facilities tolerate a range of spelling variants. The DTA presents German-language printed works from around 1650 to 1900 as full text and as digital facsimile. The selection of texts was made on the basis of lexicographical criteria and includes scientific or scholarly texts, texts from everyday life, and literary works. The digitalisation was made from the first edition of each work. Using the digital images of these editions, the text was first typed up manually twice (‘double keying’). To represent the structure of the text, the electronic full-text was encoded in conformity with the XML standard TEI P5. The next stages complete the linguistic analysis, i.e. the text is tokenised, lemmatised, and the parts of speech are annotated. The DTA thus presents a linguistically analysed, historical full-text corpus, available for a range of questions in corpus linguistics. Thanks to the interdisciplinary nature of the DTA Corpus, it also offers valuable source-texts for neighbouring disciplines in the humanities, and for scientists, legal scholars and economists.
Kaggle is a platform for predictive modelling and analytics competitions in which statisticians and data miners compete to produce the best models for predicting and describing the datasets uploaded by companies and users. This crowdsourcing approach relies on the fact that there are countless strategies that can be applied to any predictive modelling task and it is impossible to know beforehand which technique or analyst will be most effective.
The IMPC is a confederation of international mouse phenotyping projects working towards the agreed goals of the consortium: To undertake the phenotyping of 20,000 mouse mutants over a ten year period, providing the first functional annotation of a mammalian genome. Maintain and expand a world-wide consortium of institutions with capacity and expertise to produce germ line transmission of targeted knockout mutations in embryonic stem cells for 20,000 known and predicted mouse genes. Test each mutant mouse line through a broad based primary phenotyping pipeline in all the major adult organ systems and most areas of major human disease. Through this activity and employing data annotation tools, systematically aim to discover and ascribe biological function to each gene, driving new ideas and underpinning future research into biological systems; Maintain and expand collaborative “networks” with specialist phenotyping consortia or laboratories, providing standardized secondary level phenotyping that enriches the primary dataset, and end-user, project specific tertiary level phenotyping that adds value to the mammalian gene functional annotation and fosters hypothesis driven research; and Provide a centralized data centre and portal for free, unrestricted access to primary and secondary data by the scientific community, promoting sharing of data, genotype-phenotype annotation, standard operating protocols, and the development of open source data analysis tools. Members of the IMPC may include research centers, funding organizations and corporations.
ISRIC - World Soil Information is an independent foundation. As regular member of the ICS World Data System it is also known as World Data Centre for Soils (WDC-Soils). ISRIC was founded in 1966 through the International Soil Science Society (ISSS) and United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). It has a mission to serve the international community with information about the world’s soil resources to help addressing major global issues. Our work is organised according to four work streams: 1) Setting standards and references, 2) Soil information provision (databases & soil mapping), 3) Capcaity building and advocacy, and 4) Generation of derived products.
The JPL Tropical Cyclone Information System (TCIS) was developed to support hurricane research. There are three components to TCIS; a global archive of multi-satellite hurricane observations 1999-2010 (Tropical Cyclone Data Archive), North Atlantic Hurricane Watch and ASA Convective Processes Experiment (CPEX) aircraft campaign. Together, data and visualizations from the real time system and data archive can be used to study hurricane process, validate and improve models, and assist in developing new algorithms and data assimilation techniques.
TEAM is devoted to monitoring long-term trends in biodiversity, land cover change, climate and ecosystem services in tropical forests. Tropical forests received first billing because of their overwhelming significance to the global biosphere (e.g., their disproportionately large role in global carbon and energy cycles) and because of the extraordinary threats they face. About 50 percent of the species described on Earth, and an even larger proportion of species not yet described, occur in tropical forests. TEAM aims to measure and compare plants, terrestrial mammals, ground-dwelling birds and climate using a standard methodology in a range of tropical forests, from relatively pristine places to those most affected by people. TEAM currently operates in sixteen tropical forest sites across Africa, Asia and Latin America supporting a network of scientists committed to standardized methods of data collection to quantify how plants and animals respond to pressures such as climate change and human encroachment.
BioModels is a repository of mathematical models of biological and biomedical systems. It hosts a vast selection of existing literature-based physiologically and pharmaceutically relevant mechanistic models in standard formats. Our mission is to provide the systems modelling community with reproducible, high-quality, freely-accessible models published in the scientific literature.
The European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) captures and presents information relating to experimental workflows that are based around nucleotide sequencing. A typical workflow includes the isolation and preparation of material for sequencing, a run of a sequencing machine in which sequencing data are produced and a subsequent bioinformatic analysis pipeline. ENA records this information in a data model that covers input information (sample, experimental setup, machine configuration), output machine data (sequence traces, reads and quality scores) and interpreted information (assembly, mapping, functional annotation). Data arrive at ENA from a variety of sources. These include submissions of raw data, assembled sequences and annotation from small-scale sequencing efforts, data provision from the major European sequencing centres and routine and comprehensive exchange with our partners in the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC). Provision of nucleotide sequence data to ENA or its INSDC partners has become a central and mandatory step in the dissemination of research findings to the scientific community. ENA works with publishers of scientific literature and funding bodies to ensure compliance with these principles and to provide optimal submission systems and data access tools that work seamlessly with the published literature.
Earthdata powered by EOSDIS (Earth Observing System Data and Information System) is a key core capability in NASA’s Earth Science Data Systems Program. It provides end-to-end capabilities for managing NASA’s Earth science data from various sources – satellites, aircraft, field measurements, and various other programs. EOSDIS uses the metadata and service discovery tool Earthdata Search https://search.earthdata.nasa.gov/. The capabilities of EOSDIS constituting the EOSDIS Science Operations are managed by NASA's Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) Project. The capabilities include: generation of higher level (Level 1-4) science data products for several satellite missions; archiving and distribution of data products from Earth observation satellite missions, as well as aircraft and field measurement campaigns. The EOSDIS science operations are performed within a distributed system of many interconnected nodes - Science Investigator-led Processing Systems (SIPS), and distributed, discipline-specific, Earth science Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) with specific responsibilities for production, archiving, and distribution of Earth science data products. The DAACs serve a large and diverse user community by providing capabilities to search and access science data products and specialized services.
Biological collections are replete with taxonomic, geographic, temporal, numerical, and historical information. This information is crucial for understanding and properly managing biodiversity and ecosystems, but is often difficult to access. Canadensys, operated from the Université de Montréal Biodiversity Centre, is a Canada-wide effort to unlock the biodiversity information held in biological collections.
The NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis Project is a joint project between the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP, formerly "NMC") and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The goal of this joint effort is to produce new atmospheric analyses using historical data (1948 onwards) and as well to produce analyses of the current atmospheric state (Climate Data Assimilation System, CDAS).
The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Data Archive (SAMHDA) is an initiative funded under contract HHSS283201500001C with the Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality (CBHSQ), Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). CBHSQ has primary responsibility for the collection, analysis, and dissemination of SAMHSA's behavioral health data. Public use files and restricted use files are provided. CBHSQ promotes the access and use of the nation's substance abuse and mental health data through SAMHDA. SAMHDA provides public-use data files, file documentation, and access to restricted-use data files to support a better understanding of this critical area of public health.