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Found 15 result(s)
nmrshiftdb is a NMR database (web database) for organic structures and their nuclear magnetic resonance (nmr) spectra. It allows for spectrum prediction (13C, 1H and other nuclei) as well as for searching spectra, structures and other properties. Last not least, it features peer-reviewed submission of datasets by its users. The nmrshiftdb2 software is open source, the data is published under an open content license. Please consult the documentation for more detailed information. nmrshiftdb2 is the continuation of the NMRShiftDB project with additional data and bugfixes and changes in the software.
A data repository and social network so that researchers can interact and collaborate, also offers tutorials and datasets for data science learning. "data.world is designed for data and the people who work with data. From professional projects to open data, data.world helps you host and share your data, collaborate with your team, and capture context and conclusions as you work."
CODEX is a database of NGS mouse and human experiments. Although, the main focus of CODEX is Haematopoiesis and Embryonic systems, the database includes a large variety of cell types. In addition to the publically available data, CODEX also includes a private site hosting non-published data. CODEX provides access to processed and curated NGS experiments. To use CODEX: (i) select a specialized repository (HAEMCODE or ESCODE) or choose the whole compendium (CODEX), then (ii) filter by organism and (iii) choose how to explore the database.
EarthWorks is a discovery tool for geospatial (a.k.a. GIS) data. It allows users to search and browse the GIS collections owned by Stanford University Libraries, as well as data collections from many other institutions. Data can be searched spatially, by manipulating a map; by keyword search; by selecting search limiting facets (e.g., limit to a given format type); or by combining these options.
This interface provides access to several types of data related to the Chesapeake Bay. Bay Program databases can be queried based upon user-defined inputs such as geographic region and date range. Each query results in a downloadable, tab- or comma-delimited text file that can be imported to any program (e.g., SAS, Excel, Access) for further analysis. Comments regarding the interface are encouraged. Questions in reference to the data should be addressed to the contact provided on subsequent pages.
The Brown Digital Repository (BDR) is a place to gather, index, store, preserve, and make available digital assets produced via the scholarly, instructional, research, and administrative activities at Brown.
ScienceBase provides access to aggregated information derived from many data and information domains, including feeds from existing data systems, metadata catalogs, and scientists contributing new and original content. ScienceBase architecture is designed to help science teams and data practitioners centralize their data and information resources to create a foundation needed for their work. ScienceBase, both original software and engineered components, is released as an open source project to promote involvement from the larger scientific programming community both inside and outside the USGS.
!! OFFLINE !! A recent computer security audit has revealed security flaws in the legacy HapMap site that require NCBI to take it down immediately. We regret the inconvenience, but we are required to do this. That said, NCBI was planning to decommission this site in the near future anyway (although not quite so suddenly), as the 1,000 genomes (1KG) project has established itself as a research standard for population genetics and genomics. NCBI has observed a decline in usage of the HapMap dataset and website with its available resources over the past five years and it has come to the end of its useful life. The International HapMap Project is a multi-country effort to identify and catalog genetic similarities and differences in human beings. Using the information in the HapMap, researchers will be able to find genes that affect health, disease, and individual responses to medications and environmental factors. The Project is a collaboration among scientists and funding agencies from Japan, the United Kingdom, Canada, China, Nigeria, and the United States. All of the information generated by the Project will be released into the public domain. The goal of the International HapMap Project is to compare the genetic sequences of different individuals to identify chromosomal regions where genetic variants are shared. By making this information freely available, the Project will help biomedical researchers find genes involved in disease and responses to therapeutic drugs. In the initial phase of the Project, genetic data are being gathered from four populations with African, Asian, and European ancestry. Ongoing interactions with members of these populations are addressing potential ethical issues and providing valuable experience in conducting research with identified populations. Public and private organizations in six countries are participating in the International HapMap Project. Data generated by the Project can be downloaded with minimal constraints. The Project officially started with a meeting in October 2002 (https://www.genome.gov/10005336/) and is expected to take about three years.
Within WASCAL a large number of heterogeneous data are collected. These data are mainly coming from different initiated research activities within WASCAL (Core Research Program, Graduate School Program) from the hydrological-meteorological, remote sensing, biodiversity and socio economic observation networks within WASCAL, and from the activities of the WASCAL Competence Center in Ouagadougou, Burkina-Faso.
The Media Archive of the Arts is the platform for collaborative work, sharing and archiving of media at the ZHdK. It is available to students, lecturers and staff. The areas of application of the media archive are mainly focused on teaching and research, but the ZHdK departments archive and university communication also benefit. The media archive manages a wide range of visual and audiovisual content and supports collaborative forms of working.
The National Archives of the Netherlands (Nationaal Archief), which is situated in The Hague, holds over 3.5 million records that have been created by the central government, organisations and individuals and are of national significance. Many records relate to the colonial and trading history of the Netherlands in the period from 1600 to 1975. The Dutch presence in countries in North and South America, Africa and Asia is reflected within these collections.
The National Data Archive on Child Abuse and Neglect (NDACAN) promotes scholarly exchange among researchers in the child maltreatment field. NDACAN acquires microdata from leading researchers and national data collection efforts and makes these datasets available to the research community for secondary analysis.
Polish CLARIN node – CLARIN-PL Language Technology Centre – is being built at Wrocław University of Technology. The LTC is addressed to scholars in the humanities and social sciences. Registered users are granted free access to digital language resources and advanced tools to explore them. They can also archive and share their own language data (in written, spoken, video or multimodal form).
BIOS is a system designed to enable the management, visualization, and analysis of biogeographic data collected by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife and its partner organizations. BIOS integrates GIS, relational database management, and ESRI's ArcGIS Server technology to create a statewide, integrated information management tool that can be used on any computer with access to the Internet.
The Department of Energy Systems Biology Knowledgebase (KBase) is a software and data platform designed to meet the grand challenge of systems biology: predicting and designing biological function. KBase integrates data and tools in a unified graphical interface so users do not need to access them from numerous sources or learn multiple systems in order to create and run sophisticated systems biology workflows. Users can perform large-scale analyses and combine multiple lines of evidence to model plant and microbial physiology and community dynamics. KBase is the first large-scale bioinformatics system that enables users to upload their own data, analyze it (along with collaborator and public data), build increasingly realistic models, and share and publish their workflows and conclusions. KBase aims to provide a knowledgebase: an integrated environment where knowledge and insights are created and multiplied.