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Found 347 result(s)
Clone DB contains information about genomic clones and cDNA and cell-based libraries for eukaryotic organisms. The database integrates this information with sequence data, map positions, and distributor information. At this time, Clone DB contains records for genomic clones and libraries, the collection of MICER mouse gene targeting clones and cell-based gene trap and gene targeting libraries from the International Knockout Mouse Consortium, Lexicon and the International Gene Trap Consortium. A planned expansion for Clone DB will add records for additional gene targeting and gene trap clones, as well as cDNA clones.
INDEPTH is a global network of research centres that conduct longitudinal health and demographic evaluation of populations in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). INDEPTH aims to strengthen global capacity for Health and Demographic Surveillance Systems (HDSSs), and to mount multi-site research to guide health priorities and policies in LMICs, based on up-to-date scientific evidence. The data collected by the INDEPTH Network members constitute a valuable resource of population and health data for LMIC countries. This repository aims to make well documented anonymised longitudinal microdata from these Centres available to data users.
Intrepid Bioinformatics serves as a community for genetic researchers and scientific programmers who need to achieve meaningful use of their genetic research data – but can’t spend tremendous amounts of time or money in the process. The Intrepid Bioinformatics system automates time consuming manual processes, shortens workflow, and eliminates the threat of lost data in a faster, cheaper, and better environment than existing solutions. The system also provides the functionality and community features needed to analyze the large volumes of Next Generation Sequencing and Single Nucleotide Polymorphism data, which is generated for a wide range of purposes from disease tracking and animal breeding to medical diagnosis and treatment.
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The Autism Chromosome Rearrangement Database is a collection of hand curated breakpoints and other genomic features, related to autism, taken from publicly available literature: databases and unpublished data. The database is continuously updated with information from in-house experimental data as well as data from published research studies.
Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB) coordinates research and education in bioinformatics throughout Switzerland and provides bioinformatics services to the national and international research community. ExPASy gives access to numerous repositories and databases of SIB. For example: array map, MetaNetX, SWISS-MODEL and World-2DPAGE, and many others see a list here http://www.expasy.org/resources
TreeBASE is a repository of phylogenetic information, specifically user-submitted phylogenetic trees and the data used to generate them. TreeBASE accepts all types of phylogenetic data (e.g., trees of species, trees of populations, trees of genes) representing all biotic taxa. Data in TreeBASE are exposed to the public if they are used in a publication that is in press or published in a peer-reviewed scientific journal, book, conference proceedings, or thesis. Data used in publications that are in preparation or in review can be submitted to TreeBASE but are only available to the authors, publication editors, or reviewers using a special access code.
The Research Collection is ETH Zurich's publication platform. It unites the functions of a university bibliography, an open access repository and a research data repository within one platform. Researchers who are affiliated with ETH Zurich, the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, may deposit research data from all domains. They can publish data as a standalone publication, publish it as supplementary material for an article, dissertation or another text, share it with colleagues or a research group, or deposit it for archiving purposes. Research-data-specific features include flexible access rights settings, DOI registration and a DOI preview workflow, content previews for zip- and tar-containers, as well as download statistics and altmetrics for published data. All data uploaded to the Research Collection are also transferred to the ETH Data Archive, ETH Zurich’s long-term archive.
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DEG hosts records of currently available essential genomic elements, such as protein-coding genes and non-coding RNAs, among bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes. Essential genes in a bacterium constitute a minimal genome, forming a set of functional modules, which play key roles in the emerging field, synthetic biology.
The FishNet network is a collaborative effort among fish collections around the world to share and distribute data on specimen holdings. There is an open invitation for any institution with a fish collection to join.
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Human biomaterial banks (short: biobanks) are collections of human body substances (i.e. blood, DNA, urine or tissue) connected with disease specific information. This allow for research of relations between deseases and underlying (molecular) modifications and paves the way for developing target-oriented therapies ("personalized medicine"). The biobank material arises from samples taken for therapeutical or diagnostic reasons or is extracted in the context of clinical trials. An approval for usage by the patient is always needed prior to any research activities.
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As the national oceanographic data centre for Canada, MEDS maintains centralized repositories of some oceanographic data types collected in Canada, and coordinates data exchanges between DFO and recognized intergovernmental organizations, as well as acts as a central point for oceanographic data requests. Real-time, near real-time (for operational oceanography) or historical data are made available as appropriate.
Groundbreaking biomedical research requires access to cutting edge scientific resources; however such resources are often invisible beyond the laboratories or universities where they were developed. eagle-i is a discovery platform that helps biomedical scientists find previously invisible, but highly valuable, resources.
This interactive database provides complete access to statistics on seasonal cotton supply and use for each country and each region in the world, from 1920/21 to date. This project is part of ICAC’s efforts to improve the transparency of world cotton statistics.
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PLMD (Protein Lysine Modifications Database) is an online data resource specifically designed for protein lysine modifications (PLMs). The PLMD 3.0 database was extended and adapted from CPLA 1.0 (Compendium of Protein Lysine Acetylation) database and CPLM 2.0 (Compendium of Protein Lysine Modifications) database
The Biological General Repository for Interaction Datasets (BioGRID) is a public database that archives and disseminates genetic and protein interaction data from model organisms and humans. BioGRID is an online interaction repository with data compiled through comprehensive curation efforts. All interaction data are freely provided through our search index and available via download in a wide variety of standardized formats.
With the Program EnviDat we develop a unified and managed access portal for WSL's rich reservoir of environmental monitoring and research data. EnviDat is designed as a portal to publish, connect and search across existing data but is not intended to become a large data centre hosting original data. While sharing of data is centrally facilitated, data management remains decentralised and the know-how and responsibility to curate research data remains with the original data providers.
The National Sleep Research Resource (NSRR) offers free web access to large collections of de-identified physiological signals and clinical data elements collected in well-characterized research cohorts and clinical trials.
Academic Commons provides open, persistent access to the scholarship produced by researchers at Columbia University, Barnard College, Jewish Theological Seminary, Teachers College, and Union Theological Seminary. Academic Commons is a program of the Columbia University Libraries. Academic Commons accepts articles, dissertations, research data, presentations, working papers, videos, and more.
SAHFOS is an internationally funded independent research non-profit organisation responsible for the operation of the Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR) Survey. As a large-scale global survey, it provides the scientific and policy communities with a basin-wide and long-term measure of the ecological health of marine plankton. Established in 1931, the CPR Survey is the longest running, most geographically extensive marine ecological survey in the world. It has a considerable database of marine plankton and associated metadata that is used by researchers and policy makers to examine strategically important science pillars such as climate change, human health, fisheries, biodiversity, pathogens, invasive species, ocean acidification and natural capital.
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The Atlantic Canada Conservation Data Centre (ACCDC) maintains comprehensive lists of plant and animal species. The Atlantic CDC has geo-located records of species occurrences and records of extremely rare to uncommon species in the Atlantic region, including New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland, and Labrador. The Atlantic CDC also maintains biological and other types of data in a variety of linked databases.
The Gene database provides detailed information for known and predicted genes defined by nucleotide sequence or map position. Gene supplies gene-specific connections in the nexus of map, sequence, expression, structure, function, citation, and homology data. Unique identifiers are assigned to genes with defining sequences, genes with known map positions, and genes inferred from phenotypic information. These gene identifiers are used throughout NCBI's databases and tracked through updates of annotation. Gene includes genomes represented by NCBI Reference Sequences (or RefSeqs) and is integrated for indexing and query and retrieval from NCBI's Entrez and E-Utilities systems.
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GeoReM is a Max Planck Institute database for reference materials of geological and environmental interest, such as rock powders, synthetic and natural glasses as well as mineral, isotopic, biological, river water and seawater reference materials. GeoReM contains published analytical data and compilation values (major and trace element concentrations and mass fractions, radiogenic and stable isotope ratios). GeoReM contains all important metadata about the analytical values such as uncertainty, analytical method and laboratory. Sample information and references are also included. GeoReM complements the three earthchem databases: GEOROC, NAVDAT and PETDB.
This Animal Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) database (Animal QTLdb) is designed to house all publicly available QTL and trait mapping data (i.e. trait and genome location association data; collectively called "QTL data" on this site) on livestock animal species for easily locating and making comparisons within and between species. New database tools are continuely added to align the QTL and association data to other types of genome information, such as annotated genes, RH / SNP markers, and human genome maps. Besides the QTL data from species listed below, the QTLdb is open to house QTL/association date from other animal species where feasible. Note that the JAS along with other journals, now require that new QTL/association data be entered into a QTL database as part of their publication requirements.
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CBS offers Comprehensive public databases of DNA- and protein sequences, macromolecular structure, g ene and protein expression levels, pathway organization and cell signalling, have been established to optimise scientific exploitation of the explosion of data within biology. Unlike many other groups in the field of biomolecular informatics, Center for Biological Sequence Analysis directs its research primarily towards topics related to the elucidation of the functional aspects of complex biological mechanisms. Among contemporary bioinformatics concerns are reliable computational interpretation of a wide range of experimental data, and the detailed understanding of the molecular apparatus behind cellular mechanisms of sequence information. By exploiting available experimental data and evidence in the design of algorithms, sequence correlations and other features of biological significance can be inferred. In addition to the computational research the center also has experimental efforts in gene expression analysis using DNA chips and data generation in relation to the physical and structural properties of DNA. In the last decade, the Center for Biological Sequence Analysis has produced a large number of computational methods, which are offered to others via WWW servers.
OrthoMCL is a genome-scale algorithm for grouping orthologous protein sequences. It provides not only groups shared by two or more species/genomes, but also groups representing species-specific gene expansion families. So it serves as an important utility for automated eukaryotic genome annotation. OrthoMCL starts with reciprocal best hits within each genome as potential in-paralog/recent paralog pairs and reciprocal best hits across any two genomes as potential ortholog pairs. Related proteins are interlinked in a similarity graph. Then MCL (Markov Clustering algorithm,Van Dongen 2000; www.micans.org/mcl) is invoked to split mega-clusters. This process is analogous to the manual review in COG construction. MCL clustering is based on weights between each pair of proteins, so to correct for differences in evolutionary distance the weights are normalized before running MCL.