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Found 17 result(s)
Our knowledge of the many life-forms on Earth - of animals, plants, fungi, protists and bacteria - is scattered around the world in books, journals, databases, websites, specimen collections, and in the minds of people everywhere. Imagine what it would mean if this information could be gathered together and made available to everyone – anywhere – at a moment’s notice. This dream is becoming a reality through the Encyclopedia of Life.
Country
GBIF is an international organisation that is working to make the world's biodiversity data accessible everywhere in the world. GBIF and its many partners work to mobilize the data, and to improve search mechanisms, data and metadata standards, web services, and the other components of an Internet-based information infrastructure for biodiversity. GBIF makes available data that are shared by hundreds of data publishers from around the world. These data are shared according to the GBIF Data Use Agreement, which includes the provision that users of any data accessed through or retrieved via the GBIF Portal will always give credit to the original data publishers.
The Museum is committed to open access and open science, and has launched the Data Portal to make its research and collections datasets available online. It allows anyone to explore, download and reuse the data for their own research. Our natural history collection is one of the most important in the world, documenting 4.5 billion years of life, the Earth and the solar system. Almost all animal, plant, mineral and fossil groups are represented. These datasets will increase exponentially. Under the Museum's ambitious digital collections programme we aim to have 20 million specimens digitised in the next five years.
Protectedplanet.net combines crowd sourcing and authoritative sources to enrich and provide data for protected areas around the world. Data are provided in partnership with the World Database on Protected Areas (WDPA). The data include the location, designation type, status year, and size of the protected areas, as well as species information.
The National Resource for Advancing Digitization of Biodiversity Collections (ADBC) funded by the National Science Foundation. Through ADBC, data and images for millions of biological specimens are being made available in electronic format for the research community, government agencies, students, educators, and the general public
Biological collections are replete with taxonomic, geographic, temporal, numerical, and historical information. This information is crucial for understanding and properly managing biodiversity and ecosystems, but is often difficult to access. Canadensys, operated from the Université de Montréal Biodiversity Centre, is a Canada-wide effort to unlock the biodiversity information held in biological collections.
"TaiBIF" stands for Taiwan Biodiversity Information Facility. It is the Taiwan portal of GBIF, and is in charge of integrating Taiwan's biodiversity information, including lists of species and local experts, illustrations of species, introduction of endemic species and invasive species, Taiwan's terrestrial and marine organisms, biodiversity literature, geographical and environmental information, information about relevant institutions, organizations, projects, and observation spots, the Catalog of Life (a list of Taiwanese endemic species), and publications.
BioVeL is a virtual e-laboratory that supports research on biodiversity issues using large amounts of data from cross-disciplinary sources. BioVeL supports the development and use of workflows to process data. It offers the possibility to either use already made workflows or create own. BioVeL workflows are stored in MyExperiment - Biovel Group http://www.myexperiment.org/groups/643/content. They are underpinned by a range of analytical and data processing functions (generally provided as Web Services or R scripts) to support common biodiversity analysis tasks. You can find the Web Services catalogued in the BiodiversityCatalogue.
NatureServe and its network of member programs are a leading source for reliable scientific information about species and ecosystems of the Western Hemisphere. This site serves as a portal for accessing several types of publicly available biodiversity data. The Explorer lists 70,000 plants, animals, and ecological communities of the United States and Canada
The World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS) integrates approximately 100 marine datbases to provide an authoritative and comprehensive list of marine organisms. WoRMS has an editorial system where taxonomic groups are managed by experts responsible for the quality of the information. WorMS register of marine species emerged from the European Register of Marine Species (ERMS) and the Flanders Marine Institute (VLIZ). WoRMS is a contribution to Lifewatch, Catalogue of Life, Encyclopedia of Life, Global Biodiversity Information Facility and the Census of Marine Life.
MycoBank is an on-line database aimed as a service to the mycological and scientific society by documenting mycological nomenclatural novelties (new names and combinations) and associated data, for example descriptions and illustrations. The nomenclatural novelties will each be allocated a unique MycoBank number that can be cited in the publication where the nomenclatural novelty is introduced. These numbers will also be used by the nomenclatural database Index Fungorum, with which MycoBank is associated.
The National Coastal Data Development Center, a division of the National Oceanographic Data Center, is dedicated to building the long-term coastal data record to support environmental prediction, scientific analysis, and formulation of public policy. >>>!!!<<< For informations about the migration of data from NODC to NCEI see: https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/about >>>!!!<<</index.html
The USA National Phenology Network serves science and society by promoting broad understanding of plant and animal phenology and its relationship with environmental change. The Network is a consortium of individuals and organizations that collect, share, and use phenology data, models, and related information.
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SAFER-Data is a web-based interface to the Environmental Data Archive maintained by the Environmental Research Centre (ERC) in the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) of Ireland, who has responsibilities for a wide range of licensing, enforcement, monitoring and assessment activities associated with environmental protection.
The KNB Data Repository is an international repository intended to facilitate ecological, environmental and earth science research in the broadest senses. For scientists, the KNB Data Repository is an efficient way to share, discover, access and interpret complex ecological, environmental, earth science, and sociological data and the software used to create and manage those data. Due to rich contextual information provided with data in the KNB, scientists are able to integrate and analyze data with less effort. The data originate from a highly-distributed set of field stations, laboratories, research sites, and individual researchers. The KNB supports rich, detailed metadata to promote data discovery as well as automated and manual integration of data into new projects. The KNB supports a rich set of modern repository services, including the ability to assign Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) so data sets can be confidently referenced in any publication, the ability to track the versions of datasets as they evolve through time, and metadata to establish the provenance relationships between source and derived data.