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Galaxies, made up of billions of stars like our Sun, are the beacons that light up the structure of even the most distant regions in space. Not all galaxies are alike, however. They come in very different shapes and have very different properties; they may be large or small, old or young, red or blue, regular or confused, luminous or faint, dusty or gas-poor, rotating or static, round or disky, and they live either in splendid isolation or in clusters. In other words, the universe contains a very colourful and diverse zoo of galaxies. For almost a century, astronomers have been discussing how galaxies should be classified and how they relate to each other in an attempt to attack the big question of how galaxies form. Galaxy Zoo (Lintott et al. 2008, 2011) pioneered a novel method for performing large-scale visual classifications of survey datasets. This webpage allows anyone to download the resulting GZ classifications of galaxies in the project.
The UK Solar System Data Centre (UKSSDC) provides a STFC and NERC jointly funded central archive and data centre facility for Solar System science in the UK. The facilities include the World Data Centre for Solar-Terrestrial Physics, Chilton and the Cluster Ground-Based Data Centre. The UKSSDC supports data archives for the whole UK solar system community encompassing solar, inter-planetary, magnetospheric, ionospheric and geomagnetic science. The UKSSDC is part of RAL Space based at the STFC run Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in Oxfordshire.
The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is a radio telescope with around one million square metres of collecting area, designed to study the Universe with unprecedented speed and sensitivity. The SKA is not a single telescope, but a collection of various types of antennas, called an array, to be spread over long distances. The SKA will be used to answer fundamental questions of science and about the laws of nature, such as: how did the Universe, and the stars and galaxies contained in it, form and evolve? Was Einstein’s theory of relativity correct? What is the nature of ‘dark matter’ and ‘dark energy’? What is the origin of cosmic magnetism? Is there life somewhere else in the Universe?
On June 1, 1990 the German X-ray observatory ROSAT started its mission to open a new era in X-ray astronomy. Doubtless, this is the most ambitious project realized up to now in the short history of this young astronomical discipline. Equipped with the largest imaging X-ray telescope ever inserted into an earth orbit ROSAT has provided a tremendous amount of new scientific data and insights.
The UCL Research Data Repository is the institutional data repository of University College London. Based on Figshare, it accepts data deposits from UCL staff and doctoral students from all disciplines. Depositors are encouraged to use CC0 licences to make their data available to the widest possible range of users and the widest range of uses.
The Leicester Database and Archive Service (LEDAS) is an easy to use on-line astronomical database and archive access service, dealing mainly with data from high energy astrophysics missions, but also providing full database functionality for over 200 astronomical catalogues from ground-based observations and space missions. The LEDAS also allows access to images, spectra and light curves in graphics, HDS and FITS formats, as well as access to raw and processed event data. LEDAS provides the primary means of access for the UK astronomical community to the ROSAT Public Data Archive, the ASCA Public Data Archive and the Ginga Products Archive by its Archive Network Interface ARNIE.
When published in 2005, the Millennium Run was the largest ever simulation of the formation of structure within the ΛCDM cosmology. It uses 10(10) particles to follow the dark matter distribution in a cubic region 500h(−1)Mpc on a side, and has a spatial resolution of 5h−1kpc. Application of simplified modelling techniques to the stored output of this calculation allows the formation and evolution of the ~10(7) galaxies more luminous than the Small Magellanic Cloud to be simulated for a variety of assumptions about the detailed physics involved. As part of the activities of the German Astrophysical Virtual Observatory we have created relational databases to store the detailed assembly histories both of all the haloes and subhaloes resolved by the simulation, and of all the galaxies that form within these structures for two independent models of the galaxy formation physics. We have implemented a Structured Query Language (SQL) server on these databases. This allows easy access to many properties of the galaxies and halos, as well as to the spatial and temporal relations between them. Information is output in table format compatible with standard Virtual Observatory tools. With this announcement (from 1/8/2006) we are making these structures fully accessible to all users. Interested scientists can learn SQL and test queries on a small, openly accessible version of the Millennium Run (with volume 1/512 that of the full simulation). They can then request accounts to run similar queries on the databases for the full simulations. In 2008 and 2012 the simulations were repeated.
The ADAS Project is a self-funding (i.e. funded by participants) project consisting of most major fusion laboratories along with other astrophysical and university groups. As an implementation, it is an interconnected set of computer codes and data collections for modelling the radiating properties of ions and atoms in plasmas. It can address plasmas ranging from the interstellar medium through the solar atmosphere and laboratory thermonuclear fusion devices to technological plasmas. ADAS assists in the analysis and interpretation of spectral emission and supports detailed plasma models.
The WDC Geomagnetism, Edinburgh has a comprehensive set of digital geomagnetic data as well as indices of geomagnetic activity supplied from a worldwide network of magnetic observatories. The data and services at the WDC are available for scientific use without restrictions.