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Found 19 result(s)
Galaxies, made up of billions of stars like our Sun, are the beacons that light up the structure of even the most distant regions in space. Not all galaxies are alike, however. They come in very different shapes and have very different properties; they may be large or small, old or young, red or blue, regular or confused, luminous or faint, dusty or gas-poor, rotating or static, round or disky, and they live either in splendid isolation or in clusters. In other words, the universe contains a very colourful and diverse zoo of galaxies. For almost a century, astronomers have been discussing how galaxies should be classified and how they relate to each other in an attempt to attack the big question of how galaxies form. Galaxy Zoo (Lintott et al. 2008, 2011) pioneered a novel method for performing large-scale visual classifications of survey datasets. This webpage allows anyone to download the resulting GZ classifications of galaxies in the project.
The International Service of Geomagnetic Indices (ISGI) is in charge of the elaboration and dissemination of geomagnetic indices, and of tables of remarkable magnetic events, based on the report of magnetic observatories distributed all over the planet, with the help of ISGI Collaborating Institutes. The interaction between the solar wind, including plasma and interplanetary magnetic field, and the Earth's magnetosphere results in a transfer of energy and particles inside the magnetosphere. Solar wind characteristics are highly variable, and they have actually a direct influence on the shape and size of the magnetosphere, on the amount of transferred energy, and on the way this energy is dissipated. It is clear that the great diversity of sources of magnetic variations give rise to a great complexity in ground magnetic signatures. Geomagnetic indices aim at describing the geomagnetic activity or some of its components. Each geomagnetic index is related to different phenomena occurring in the magnetosphere, ionosphere and deep in the Earth in its own unique way. The location of a measurement, the timing of the measurement and the way the index is calculated all affect the type of phenomenon the index relates to. The IAGA endorsed geomagnetic indices and lists of remarkable geomagnetic events constitute unique temporal and spatial coverage data series homogeneous since middle of 19th century.
The US Virtual Astronomical Observatory (VAO) is the VO effort based in the US, and it is one of many VO projects currently underway worldwide. The primary emphasis of the VAO is to provide new scientific research capabilities to the astronomy community. Thus an essential component of the VAO activity is obtaining input from US astronomers about the research tools that are most urgently needed in their work, and this information will guide the development efforts of the VAO. >>>!!!<<< Funding discontinued in 2014 and all software, documentation, and other digital assets developed under the VAO are stored in the VAO Project Repository https://sites.google.com/site/usvirtualobservatory/ . Code is archived on Github https://github.com/TomMcGlynn/usvirtualobservatory . >>>!!!<<<
The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is one of the most ambitious and influential surveys in the history of astronomy. Over eight years of operations (SDSS-I, 2000-2005; SDSS-II, 2005-2008; SDSS-III 2008-2014; SDSS-IV 2013 ongoing), it obtained deep, multi-color images covering more than a quarter of the sky and created 3-dimensional maps containing more than 930,000 galaxies and more than 120,000 quasars. DSS-IV is managed by the Astrophysical Research Consortium for the Participating Institutions of the SDSS Collaboration including the Carnegie Institution for Science, Carnegie Mellon University, the Chilean Participation Group, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, The Johns Hopkins University, Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU) / University of Tokyo, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Leibniz Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik (MPA Garching), Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik (MPE), Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie (MPIA Heidelberg), National Astronomical Observatory of China, New Mexico State University, New York University, The Ohio State University, Pennsylvania State University, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, United Kingdom Participation Group, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, University of Arizona, University of Colorado Boulder, University of Portsmouth, University of Utah, University of Washington, University of Wisconsin, Vanderbilt University, and Yale University.
The IERS provides data on Earth orientation, on the International Celestial Reference System/Frame, on the International Terrestrial Reference System/Frame, and on geophysical fluids. It maintains also Conventions containing models, constants and standards.
The Earth Orientation Centre is responsible for monitoring of long-term earth orientation parameters, publications for time dissemination and leap second announcements.
The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is a radio telescope with around one million square metres of collecting area, designed to study the Universe with unprecedented speed and sensitivity. The SKA is not a single telescope, but a collection of various types of antennas, called an array, to be spread over long distances. The SKA will be used to answer fundamental questions of science and about the laws of nature, such as: how did the Universe, and the stars and galaxies contained in it, form and evolve? Was Einstein’s theory of relativity correct? What is the nature of ‘dark matter’ and ‘dark energy’? What is the origin of cosmic magnetism? Is there life somewhere else in the Universe?
The Radio Telescope Data Center (RTDC) reduces, archives, and makes available on its web site data from SMA and the CfA Millimeter-wave Telescope. The whole-Galaxy CO survey presented in Dame et al. (2001) is a composite of 37 separate surveys. The data from most of these surveys can be accessed. Larger composites of these surveys are available separately.
The Inter-regional Geomagnetic Data Center of the Russian-Ukrainian INTERMAGNET segment is operated by the Geophysical Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences (GC RAS). Geomagnetic data are transmitted from observatories and stations located in Russia and Ukraine. The particular feature of the Center is the automated system for real-time recognition of artificial (anthropogenic) disturbances in incoming data. Being based on fuzzy logic approach, this quality control system facilitates the preparation of the definitive magnetograms from preliminary records carried out by data experts manually. The collected geomagnetic data are stored using relational database management system. The geomagnetic database is intended for storing both 1-minute and 1-second data. The results of anthropogenic disturbance recognition are also stored in the database.
The Australian National University undertake work to collect and publish metadata about research data held by ANU, and in the case of four discipline areas, Earth Sciences, Astronomy, Phenomics and Digital Humanities to develop pipelines and tools to enable the publication of research data using a common and repeatable approach. Aims and outcomes: To identify and describe research data held at ANU, to develop a consistent approach to the publication of metadata on the University's data holdings: Identification and curation of significant orphan data sets that might otherwise be lost or inadvertently destroyed, to develop a culture of data data sharing and data re-use.
Numerical database of atomic and molecular processes and particle-surface interactions. ALADDIN has formatted data on atomic structure and spectra (energy levels,wave lengths, and transition probabilities); electron and heavy particle collisions with atoms, ions, and molecules (cross sections and/or rate coefficients, including, in most cases, analytic fit to the data); sputtering of surfaces by impact of main plasma constituents and self sputtering; particle reflection from surfaces; thermophysical and thermomechanical properties of beryllium and pyrolytic graphites.
The WDC is concerned with the collection, management, distribution and utilization of data from Chinese provinces, autonomous regions and counties,including: Resource data:management,distribution and utlilzation of land, water, climate, forest, grassland, minerals, energy, etc. Environmental data:pollution,environmental quality, change, natural disasters,soli erosion, etc. Biological resources:animals, plants,wildlife Social economy:agriculture, industry, transport, commerce,infrastructure,etc. Population and labor Geographic background data on scales of 1:4M,1:1M, 1:(1/2)M, 1:2500, etc.
The COordinated Molecular Probe Line Extinction Thermal Emission Survey of Star Forming Regions (COMPLETE) provides a range of data complementary to the Spitzer Legacy Program "From Molecular Cores to Planet Forming Disks" (c2d) for the Perseus, Ophiuchus and Serpens regions. In combination with the Spitzer observations, COMPLETE will allow for detailed analysis and understanding of the physics of star formation on scales from 500 A.U. to 10 pc.
The WDC has a FTP-server to distribute the PCN index derived from the geomagnetic observatory Qaanaaq (THL) and the Kp-index data products derived at the geomagnetic observatory Niemegk (NGK). The WDC is also holding extensive archives of magnetograms and other geomagnetic observatory data products that predate the introduction of digital data recording. The material is in analogue form such as film or microfiche. The Polar Cap index (abbreviation PC index) consists of the Polar Cap North (PCN) and the Polar Cap South (PCS) index, which are derived from magnetic measurements taken at the geomagnetic observatories Qaanaaq (THL, Greenland, +85o magnetic latitude) and Vostok (VOS, Antarctica, -83o magnetic latitude), respectively. The idea behind these indices is to estimate the intensity of anti-sunward plasma convection in the polar caps. This convection is associated with electric Hall currents and consequent magnetic field variations perpendicular to the antisunward plasma flow (and related Hall current) which can be monitored at the Qaanaaq and Vostok magnetic observatories. PC aims at monitoring the energy input from solar wind to the magnetosphere (loading activity). The index is constructed in such a way that it has a linear relationship with the merging Electric Field at the magnetopause; consequently PC is given in units of mV/m as for the electric field. In August 2013, the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy (IAGA) endorsed the PC index. The endorsed PC index is accessible at pcindex.org or through WDC Copenhagen.
The NASA/GEWEX SRB project is a major component of the GEWEX radiation research. The objective of the NASA/GEWEX SRB project is to determine surface, top-of-atmosphere (TOA), and atmospheric shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) radiative fluxes with the precision needed to predict transient climate variations and decadal-to-centennial climate trends.
The Astronomy data repository at Harvard is currently open to all scientific data from astronomical institutions worldwide. Incorporating Astroinformatics of galaxies and quasars Dataverse. The Astronomy Dataverse is connected to the indexing services provided by the SAO/NASA Astrophysical Data Service (ADS).