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Found 10 result(s)
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The Atlantic Canada Conservation Data Centre (ACCDC) maintains comprehensive lists of plant and animal species. The Atlantic CDC has geo-located records of species occurrences and records of extremely rare to uncommon species in the Atlantic region, including New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland, and Labrador. The Atlantic CDC also maintains biological and other types of data in a variety of linked databases.
Our knowledge of the many life-forms on Earth - of animals, plants, fungi, protists and bacteria - is scattered around the world in books, journals, databases, websites, specimen collections, and in the minds of people everywhere. Imagine what it would mean if this information could be gathered together and made available to everyone – anywhere – at a moment’s notice. This dream is becoming a reality through the Encyclopedia of Life.
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Our Frozen Zoo® is the largest and most diverse collection of its kind in the world. It contains over 10,000 living cell cultures, oocytes, sperm, and embryos representing nearly 1,000 taxa, including one extinct species, the po’ouli. Located at the Beckman Center for Conservation Research, the collection is also duplicated for safekeeping at a second site. The irreplaceable living cell lines, gametes, and embryos stored in the Frozen Zoo® provide an invaluable resource for conservation, assisted reproduction, evolutionary biology, and wildlife medicine.
The Biodiversity Research Program (PPBio) was created in 2004 with the aims of furthering biodiversity studies in Brazil, decentralizing scientific production from already-developed academic centers, integrating research activities and disseminating results across a variety of purposes, including environmental management and education. PPBio contributes its data to the DataONE network as a member node: https://search.dataone.org/#profile/PPBIO
This site offers an enormous collection of photographs of wild species and natural history objects. It covers most groups of organisms with the exception of birds and other vertebrates. The photographs are presented to illustrate biodiversity and as an aid to identification. The criterion for inclusion of a species is that it must have been, or might be expected to be, found in Britain or Ireland. BioImages follows the biological classification. Biota is a hierarchical system with species grouped in genera, genera in families, families in orders and so on up to kingdoms and superkingdoms. The datasets are linked to bioinfo: food webs and species interactions in the Biodiversity of UK and Ireland.
VertNet is a NSF-funded collaborative project that makes biodiversity data free and available on the web. VertNet is a tool designed to help people discover, capture, and publish biodiversity data. It is also the core of a collaboration between hundreds of biocollections that contribute biodiversity data and work together to improve it. VertNet is an engine for training current and future professionals to use and build upon best practices in data quality, curation, research, and data publishing. Yet, VertNet is still the aggregate of all of the information that it mobilizes. To us, VertNet is all of these things and more.
Country
The Atlas of Living Australia (ALA) combines and provides scientifically collected data from a wide range of sources such as museums, herbaria, community groups, government departments, individuals and universities. Data records consist of images, literature, molecular DNA data, identification keys, species interaction data, species profile data, nomenclature, source data, conservation indicators, and spatial data.
invasive.org is a project of the University of Georgia’s Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health and one of the four major parts of BugwoodImages. The Focus is on invasive and exotic species of North America. This can be animals, plants, insects, and pathogens. It provides an easily accessible archive of high quality images for use in educational applications. In most cases, the images found in this system were taken by and loaned to us by photographers other than ourselves. Most are in the realm of public sector images. The photographs are in this system to be used.
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Country
The TERN Data Discovery Portal (TDDP) is a gateway to search and access all the datasets published by Australian Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network. In the TERN data discovery portal, users can conduct textual and graphical searches on the metadata catalogue using a web interface with temporal, spatial, and eco science related controlled vocabulary keywords. Requests to download data discovered through the portal are serviced by an individual TERN facility hosting the data. Downloading, using and sharing data will be subjected to the TERN data licensing framework (http://tern.org.au/datalicence).
The British Columbia Conservation Data Centre (CDC) collects and disseminates information on plants, animals and ecosystems at risk in British Columbia. The " BC Species and Ecosystems Explorer" is a source for authoritative conservation information on approximately 7400 plants and animals, and over 600 ecological communities (ecosystems)in British Columbia. Information includes conservation status, legal designation, and ecosection values for ecological communities.