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Found 58 result(s)
Online Mendelian Inheritance in Animals (OMIA) is a catalogue/compendium of inherited disorders, other (single-locus) traits, and genes in 218 animal species (other than human and mouse and rats, which have their own resources) authored by Professor Frank Nicholas of the University of Sydney, Australia, with help from many people over the years. OMIA information is stored in a database that contains textual information and references, as well as links to relevant PubMed and Gene records at the NCBI, and to OMIM and Ensembl.
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The USC Research Bank is the institutional research repository for the University of the Sunshine Coast. It provides an open access showcase of the University's scholarly research output ensuring that research is made available to the local, national and international communities. USC Research Bank is harvested by search engines, and is also indexed by the National Library of Australia's TROVE. By making research easily accessible, it also facilitates collaboration between researchers. Where possible, access to the full text of the publication is made available, in line with copyright permissions for each output. To access relevant research, use the Browse function, or specific records can be searched for by using the search box. Find research data by filtering by resource type 'Research Dataset'.
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It captures and catalogues ancient human genome and microbiome data, including raw sequence and processed data, along with metadata about its provenance and production. Included datasets are generated from ancient samples studied at the Australian Centre for Ancient DNA, University of Adelaide in collaboration with other research groups. Datasets and collections in OAGR are open data resources made freely available in a reusable form, using open file formats and licensed with minimal restrictions for reuse. Digital object identifiers (DOIs) are minted for included datasets and collections to facilitate persistent identification and citation.
As with most biomedical databases, the first step is to identify relevant data from the research community. The Monarch Initiative is focused primarily on phenotype-related resources. We bring in data associated with those phenotypes so that our users can begin to make connections among other biological entities of interest. We import data from a variety of data sources. With many resources integrated into a single database, we can join across the various data sources to produce integrated views. We have started with the big players including ClinVar and OMIM, but are equally interested in boutique databases. You can learn more about the sources of data that populate our system from our data sources page https://monarchinitiative.org/about/sources.
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The UWA Research Repository contains research publications, research datasets and theses created by researchers and postgraduates affiliated with UWA. It is managed by the University Library and provides access to research datasets held at the University of Western Australia. The information about each dataset has been provided by UWA research groups. Dataset metadata is harvested into Research Data Australia (RDA: https://researchdata.ands.org.au/). Language: The user interface language of the research data repository.
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The Ningaloo Atlas was created in response to the need for more comprehensive and accessible information on environmental and socio-economic data on the greater Ningaloo region. As such, the Ningaloo Atlas is a web portal to not only access and share information, but to celebrate and promote the biodiversity, heritage, value, and way of life of the greater Ningaloo region.
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Research Data Australia is the data discovery service of the Australian National Data Service (ANDS). We do not store the data itself here but provide descriptions of, and links to, the data from our data publishing partners. ANDS is funded by the Australian Government through the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy (NCRIS).
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ArachnoServer is a manually curated database containing information on the sequence, three-dimensional structure, and biological activity of protein toxins derived from spider venom. Spiders are the largest group of venomous animals and they are predicted to contain by far the largest number of pharmacologically active peptide toxins (Escoubas et al., 2006). ArachnoServer has been custom-built so that a wide range of biological scientists, including neuroscientists, pharmacologists, and toxinologists, can readily access key data relevant to their discipline without being overwhelmed by extraneous information.
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Research Data Finder is QUT’s discovery service for research data created or collected by QUT researchers. Designed to promote the visibility of QUT research datasets, Research Data Finder provides descriptions about shareable, reusable datasets available via open or mediated access.
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The Griffith University Research Data Repository makes the collections and datasets produced by Griffith researchers accessible and searchable.
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Figshare has been chosen as the University of Adelaide's official data and digital object repository with unlimited local storage. All current staff and HDR students can access and publish research data and digital objects on the University of Adelaide's Figshare site. Because Figshare is cloud-based, you can access it anywhere and at any time.
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BioGrid Australia Limited operates a federated data sharing platform for collaborative translational health and medical research providing a secure infrastructure that advances health research by linking privacy-protected and ethically approved data among a wide network of health collaborators. BioGrid links real-time de-identified health data across institutions, jurisdictions and diseases to assist researchers and clinicians improve their research and clinical outcomes. The web-based infrastructure provides ethical access while protecting both privacy and intellectual property.
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MyTardis began at Monash University to solve the problem of users needing to store large datasets and share them with collaborators online. Its particular focus is on integration with scientific instruments, instrument facilities and research lab file storage. Our belief is that the less effort a researcher has to expend safely storing data, the more likely they are to do so. This approach has flourished with MyTardis capturing data from areas such as protein crystallography, electron microscopy, medical imaging and proteomics and with deployments at Australian institutions such as University of Queensland, RMIT, University of Sydney and the Australian Synchrotron. Data access via https://www.massive.org.au/ and https://store.erc.monash.edu.au/experiment/view/104/ and see 'remarks'.
Greengenes is an Earth Sciences website that assists clinical and environmental microbiologists from around the globe in classifying microorganisms from their local environments. A 16S rRNA gene database addresses limitations of public repositories by providing chimera screening, standard alignment, and taxonomic classification using multiple published taxonomies.
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The Australian SuperSite Network Data Portal presents data on vegetation, fauna, soil, water, daily meteorology and daily recorded soundscapes from 10 SuperSites across a diverse range of biomes, including tropical rainforest, grassland and savanna; wet and dry sclerophyll forest and woodland; and semi-arid grassland, woodland and savanna.
The IMPC is a confederation of international mouse phenotyping projects working towards the agreed goals of the consortium: To undertake the phenotyping of 20,000 mouse mutants over a ten year period, providing the first functional annotation of a mammalian genome. Maintain and expand a world-wide consortium of institutions with capacity and expertise to produce germ line transmission of targeted knockout mutations in embryonic stem cells for 20,000 known and predicted mouse genes. Test each mutant mouse line through a broad based primary phenotyping pipeline in all the major adult organ systems and most areas of major human disease. Through this activity and employing data annotation tools, systematically aim to discover and ascribe biological function to each gene, driving new ideas and underpinning future research into biological systems; Maintain and expand collaborative “networks” with specialist phenotyping consortia or laboratories, providing standardized secondary level phenotyping that enriches the primary dataset, and end-user, project specific tertiary level phenotyping that adds value to the mammalian gene functional annotation and fosters hypothesis driven research; and Provide a centralized data centre and portal for free, unrestricted access to primary and secondary data by the scientific community, promoting sharing of data, genotype-phenotype annotation, standard operating protocols, and the development of open source data analysis tools. Members of the IMPC may include research centers, funding organizations and corporations.
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Curtin University has 222 data records in Research Data Australia, which cover 199 subjects areas including Applied research, EARTH SCIENCES and GEOLOGY and involve 32 group(s)
The Paleobiology Database (PaleoBioDB) is a non-governmental, non-profit public resource for paleontological data. It has been organized and operated by a multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional, international group of paleobiological researchers. Its purpose is to provide global, collection-based occurrence and taxonomic data for organisms of all geological ages, as well data services to allow easy access to data for independent development of analytical tools, visualization software, and applications of all types. The Database’s broader goal is to encourage and enable data-driven collaborative efforts that address large-scale paleobiological questions.
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In a changing climate, water raises increasingly complex challenges: concerning its quantity, quality, availability, allocation, use and significance as a habitat, resource and cultural medium. Dharmae, a ‘Data Hub of Australian Research on Marine and Aquatic Ecocultures’ brings together multi-disciplinary research data relating to water in all these forms. The term “ecoculture” guides the development of this collection and its approach to data discovery. Ecoculture recognizes that, since nature and culture are inextricably linked, there is a corresponding need for greater interconnectedness of the different knowledge systems applied to them.
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This study assessed differences in avian biodiversity across different forest age-classes, including mature stands (> 100 years), in a managed, mixed-species eucalypt forest located in Gippsland, south-eastern Australia. Avian surveys and detailed habitat measurements were initially carried out in 50 two hectare stands ranging in age from 100 years. Extensive wildfire which occurred during the study reduced the number of sites to 28 (seven in each of four age classes) upon which analyses and inferences were made. Mature vegetation (> 100 years) had the greatest richness, abundance and biomass of birds. Key ecological resources, such as tree-hollows for nesting, generally occurred mostly in stands > 60 years. There were quantum increases in all measures of avian biodiversity in mature stands (> 100 years). The visualisation of the survey data is part of an interoperable web-GIS maintained by the Centre for eResearch and Digital Innovation (CeRDI) at Federation University Australia (FedUni).
TemperateReefBase is a resource for temperate reef researchers worldwide to use and contribute data. Unique in its role as a one-stop-shop for global temperate reef data, TemperateReefBase was initially established by IMAS in collaboration with the Kelp Ecology Ecosystem Network (KEEN). KEEN was instigated through a National Centre for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) working group which assembled experts from around the world to examine the impacts of global change on kelp-bed ecosystem worldwide. The group has assembled significant global data for kelps, other seaweeds and associated species including fishes, and has embarked on unprecedented global experiments and surveys in which identical experiments and surveys are being conducted at sites in kelp beds around the world to determine global trends and examine the capacity of kelps to respond to disturbance in the face of climate change and other anthropogenic stressors. The TemperateReefBase Data Portal is an online discovery interface showcasing temperate reef data collected from around the globe. The portal aims to make this data freely and openly available for the benefit of marine and environmental science as a whole. The TemperateReefBase Data Portal is hosted and maintained by the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies at the University of Tasmania, Australia.